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Full text of "Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine"

Maryland ^ \re "f>ooK Room 

UNI VERS . ..iND library: 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Im. 7-7-44. 

PROPERTY OF 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 



PRESENTED BY 



Secretary's Of fie© 




W) WT WCULATf 



Baltimore '^Ohio 

EmUc^es Majazine 




THE FOOD SITUATION 

[No. 3 OF A SERIES] 



THE chief source of fats for eating is in 
dairy products. We are able to pro- 
duce no more of these now than before the 
war. Yet last year we sent to Europe three 
times as much butter and fifteen times as 
much condensed milk as we used to send. 
Because their milk cows are still decreasing 
we must send even more butter and con- 
densed milk this year. Because their hogs 
are decreasing we must send them more lard. 



You can help. 

Use no butter in cooking except left-overs 
that would otherwise go to waste. Cook 
with corn or cottonseed oil instead. Save 
lard. 

Try to use up all left-over fats in cooking, 
but if there is some you can not use save it 
carefully, make scrubbing soap out of it, or 
sell it to the soap maker. 



THE UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION asks you to get 
behind our soldiers, sailors and associates by sending them now the most 
food possible in the least shipping space. Every man, woman and child 
in America can help by eating less wheat, beef, pork, fats and sugar, more 
of other plentiful foods which can not be shipp)ed, and by avoiding waste. 



EAT PLENTY, WISELY. WITHOUT WASTE, 
AND HELP WIN THE WAR 



Reprint from material furnished by the 

UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



3 




ST. JOE, INDIANA 



MAIN STREET 

19 rooms, shingle roof, brick foundation. 
1 out building 10 feet by 12 feet. Lot 100 
feet by 150 feet. Price $1600.00. Suitable 
for hotel or large boarding house. 



FLORA, ILLINOIS 



AUSTIN STREET 

4 rooms, city water and sewer, shingle 
roof, concrete foundation. Lot 74 feet by 
208 feet. Price $1000.00. 





GARRETT, INDIANA 



SOUTH PETER STREET 

8 rooms, gas and electric lights, city water 
and sewer, shingle roof, brick foundation. 
Lot 50 feet by 125 feet. Price $1450.00. 



MIDLAND CITY, OHIO 



6 rooms and out building, shingle roof, 
stone and brick foundation. Lot of about 
one-third of an acre. Price $600.00. 




Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



4 THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



I I President Wilson created the Committee on Public Information to tell the 
f f people the TRUTH. As a part of its work this Committee has prepared 
I I a series of thirty -seven booklets, each dealing with a vital war problem- 
These booklets will be furnished free upon request. Fill in coupon below. 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION 

The Secretary of State The Secretary of the Navy 

The Secretary of War George Creel 

8 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. 



FACTS ABOUT THE WAR COUPON 

{•ill in and mail, under first class postage (3c) to 
Department of Distribution, 

Committee on Public Information, 

8 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. (Date) 

Please send me, free of any charge, the booklets which I have checked, to 
the address given below. 

□ Conquest cr KuUur □ German War Practices □ Why A merica Fights Germany 

My name is 

Street address - 

City 

Baltimore and Ohio Employea Magazine, M ly, 1918 



II FACTS ABOUT THE WAR II 

11 11 

1 1 IMPORTANT WAR INFORMATION BOOKLETS 1 1 

1 1 ISSUED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT I f 



i I 



i I /"OUR government desires that everybody be given an opportunity to 1 | 

I i I learn all facts about the War. Every American should know WHY | | 

I ! we entered this war. Every American should know WHY we must | } 

f I fight on until the high ideals of Americanism and Democracy are attained. | | 



CONQUEST AND KULTUR. Contents: Hundreds of quotations from | | 

I Booklet t;}^g writings of leading German statesmen, professors and publicists, | | 

I ^o. 5 revealing the Prussian idea of world conquest. One section is devoted to | | 

Germany's designs upon the United States with special reference to the i f 

Monroe Doctrine. 160 pages with comprehensive map. | | 

GERMAN WAR PRACTICES. Prussianism in all its horror. Methods | | 

Booklet of tjje German Military Machine. Documentary proofs of German i i 

-''^ 0. 6 official brutalities upon civilians. Narrating instances of frightfulness | | 

taken directly from German sources. | j 

Booklet " "^^ AMERICA FIGHTS GERMANY. A statement why America . j I 

No 115 ^^^^^^^ I-^c^ls with offences of Germany against America and • | | 

against the world. The case in a nutshell written in plain language. 1 | 



The above mentioned are but three of a series of thirty-seven authentic war 
publications. Fill in coupon below and these three booklets will be sent you t , 
together with a complete catalogue from which you may select other booklets. f j 



ii 
II 



^TTThis space is | f 

j1 patriotically 
donated to our 
government by the 
publishers of the 
Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Maga- 
zine in apprecia- 
tion of the value 
of having every 
American read 
these important 
war booklets - • 



□ 



Phase mention our magazine when writing advertisers 




Volume 6 



CONTENTS 

■Eighty-six Per Cent, ot Baltimore and Ohio Employes Subscribe for 

Third Liberty Bond 7 

The Increase in the Cost of Materials — Present Prices Compared 

with 1914 Prices 9, 

Third Liberty Loan Subscriptions— Mount Clare 11 

Prize Contest 12 

Lieutenant Daniel Willard, Jr., Cited for Bravery While Under Heavy Fire . 13 
S. S. Tuckahoe. "Wonder Ship" of Emergency Fleet Corporation, 

Loaded at Our Curtis Bay Coal Pier in Record Time 15 

Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club, Cumberland, Md 16 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Y. M. C. A., Cumberland, Md., Goes 

"Over the Top" 17 

Railroad Y. hr. C. A. at Brunswick, Md., Does Fine Work During 

Year Ending March 31 li 

The Red Cross— What It Is and What It Does 20 

A Flying Chip is as Dangerous as a Shell Fragment — Wear Your Goggles ! . . 24 

Letters From France 25 

Dining Car Department Aiding U. S. Food Administration to Pre- 
vent Potato Waste 28 

James Taylor, Jr.. of Car Service Department, Killed in Action 29 

Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club Gives Benefit for Employes in 

Military Service 30 

W. W. Wood Stirs Cincinnati Audience „ 31 

Bowling Prizes Awarded 33 

President Willard Offers Baseball Cup 34 

R. J. Cole, First Editor of Employes Magazine, to Join Y..M.C. A. 

Workers in Italy 35 

Willard the First Town in Ohio to Capture Honor Flag in Liberty 

Bond Drive ^ , ... 35 

Red Cross Girls of the Accounting Department— General Offices 36 

Changes and. Promotions 37 

Farewell Reception Given F. P. Pfahler 39 

Connellsville Division Veterans hold Patriotic Rally to Boost 

Liberty Bond Sale 40 

Statement of Pension Feature 41 

Editorial 42 

Woman's Department 44 

Safety First Roll of Honor 48 

Among Ourselves : 51 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryiand, by the employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write on one side of^the sheet only 



TELEGRAM 



The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company 



To All Officers and Employes of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad: 

You will be pleased and proud to know that 
over fifty-three thousand Baltimore and Ohio 
employes subscribed to the Third Liberty Loan 
and that the total amount taken will be nearly 
three million nine hundred thousand dollars. 

No better evidence than this could possibly be 
given of the loyalty and patriotism of the Balti- 
more and Ohio employes and of their determina- 
tion to do their part towards winning the war, 
and I am more than ever proud to. be included 
as one of their number. 



Baltimore, Md., May 9, 1918. 




Eighty-Six Per Cent, of Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Subscribe for Third Liberty Bonds 



A COMPARISON 

BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD 

SUSCRIBERS AMOUNT SUBSCRIBED 

Third Loan 56,351 $4,058,000 

First Loan 5,703 459,750 

Second Loan 7,601 523,100 

13,304 $982,850 



Comparison of figures for all Eastern Railroads (compiled from information available at | 

time of going to press). Third Liberty Loan, and Baltimore and Ohio: | 

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN | 

SUBSCRIBERS SUBSCRIPTION AVERAGE SUBSCRIPTION 1 

All Eastern Roads 700,000 $45,000,000 $64.29 1 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 56.351 4,058,000 72.01 | 

SECOND LIBERTY LOAN | 

SUBSCRIBERS SUBSCRIPTION AVERAGE SUBSCRIPTION 1 

All Eastern Roads 263.000 $19,000,000 $72.24 I 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 7,601 523,100 68.82 | 

INCREASE THIRD OVER SECOND LOAN § 

AVERAGE I 

SUBSCRIBERS SUBSCRIPTION SUBSCRIPTION | 

All Eastern Roads 437,700—166% $26,000,000—137% S7.95 Dec— 11% Dec. 1 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. . 48,750—641% 3.534,900—576% 3.19 Inc.— 5% Inc. i 



HE final tabulation of subscrip- 
tions for the Third Liberty Loan 
by employes of the Baltimore 
and Ohio System reveals that 
eighty-six per cent, gladly loaned their 
money to the Government. The amount 
of bonds subscribed for was S4,058,000. 
This is an accomplishment of which every 
one on the payroll may feel proud and 
one that will stand comparison with the 
results reported by any big organization 
in the country. 

J. S. Murray, general chairman, Third 
Liberty Loan Campaign Committee, 
on May 7 sent a message to other mem- 
bers of the committee, which follows: 

' 'Please accept my sincere thanks 
and congratulations for yourself and 
all of those subscribing upon splendid 
and patriotic showing made by your 
committee and sub-committee under 
you. It will interest you to know that 
total subscriptions received so far ex- 
ceed three million nine hundred thous- 
and dollars and over fifty-three thousand 
subscribers; or eighty-one per cent, of 
all employes. 



'^We knew that all of our fellow employes 
would subscribe liberally if they were given 
opportunity and their patriotic response 
has fidly justified the faith we had in them. 
There were doubtless many who were wil- 
ling, but unable, to subscribe and their ac- 
tions should in no way prevent them from 
sharing in the exchange of congratulations.'' 

A telegram signed by President Wil- 
lard, which appears on the opposite 
page, and the message of the general 
chairman, were sent before all reports 
were in, which accounts for both contain- 
ing figures lower than those shown in 
the final tabulation. 

The splendid team work displayed 
during the campaign was a striking les- 
son of what can be accomplished when 
a huge organization :s united in its 
efforts. Patriotism was the keynote 
sounded by members of the committee and 
sub-committees when they approached 
the individual, and every man and 
woman was told in convincing language 
that every dollar subscribed to the Lib- 
erty Loan represented a dollar invested 
in American manhood. 




7 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Of course, there was keen, but friendly, 
rivalry among employes, who made every 
effort to have their shop or office report 
the highest percentage. In Baltimore 
it was a ^'nip and tuck" race between 
the general offices and the Mt. Clare 
shops. The former won out by one- 
half of one per cent., having a total of 
95 per cent, against 94.5 per cent, by the 
last named. 

On the divisions, committees worked 
day and night and all made an excellent 
showing, as is evident from the fol- 
lowing compilation: 





SuBSrBIBERS 


Amount 


-.>cVV 1 Ul rv. J->'1 V IblUH . . . 




1 i o , oou 


Philadelphia Division. . 


1,302 


76,500 


Baltimore Division 


3.832 


212,950 


Cumberland Division. . . 


4,285 


283,200 


Connellsville Division. . 


3.247 


276,450 


Pittsburgh Division. . . . 


4,179 


269,750 


New Castle Division 


2,553 


163,800 


Monongah Division .... 


2^982 


264,000 


Wheeling Division 


2,255 


148,650 


Ohio River Division. . . . 


1,282 


80.900 


Cleveland Division 


2,347 


147,050 


Gen'l Sup't, Baltimore, 




Pittsb'gh and Wheeling 


65 


8,350 


Total, Lines East. . . 


28,329 


$1,931,600 


Newark Division 


2,971 


$212,000 


Chicago Division. ...... 


3,917 


266,150 


Toledo Division 


4,152 


288,500 


Ohio Division 


2,085 


164,250 


Indiana Division 


1,245 


124,950 


Illinois Division 


2,588 


175,700 


Sandy Valley & Elkhorn 


62 


11,400 


Cincinnati Terminals, 






Northwest District. . . 


953 


57,700 


Cincinnati Terminals, 






Southwest District. . . 


1,008 


67,150 


General Offices, Cincin- 




nati, Ohio 


310 


33,150 


Total, Lines West. . 


19,291 


$1,400,950 



The campaign among Baltimore and 
Ohio employes was inaugurated under 
the personal direction of President Wil- 
lard, who on April 15 called a conference 
at which vice-president Shriver presided 
and J. S. Murray, assistant to president, 
was appointed general chairman. The 
plans there outlined were put into effect 
immediately, and th(^ sanu; day members 
bearing full instructions left Baltimore for 
the; various division points and before 
twenty-four hours had (ilapscMl division 
committees and sub-coinmitte(!S were out 
among the men soliciting subscriptions. 



E. V. Baugh, superintendent of dining 
cars, was assigned to the Philadelphia 
Division; W. E. Lowes, general passenger 
agent, to the Monongah, Wheeling and 
Ohio River Divisions; H. 0. Hartzell, chief 
of industrial bureau, to the Connellsville^ 
Pittsburgh and New Castle Divisions ; J. E. 
Spurrier to the Shenandoah and Cumber- 
land Divisions, and John T. Broderick, 
supervisor of special bureaus, to the Cleve- 
land, Chicago and Newark Divisions. 
Later, the System was toured by a number 
of speakers, who addressed shop meetings 
and town gatherings. Among these were 
W. W. Wood, George F. Sturmer and 
local counsel on all parts of the System. 

Following is a table of subscriptions 
by employes of the general offices. 
This does not include those who report 
to heads of departments located in the 
Baltimore and Ohio building, but whose 
duties require that they have offices on 
various parts of the System. 

Baltimore and Ohio Building 

Subscribers Amount 



Valuation 63 S6,500 

Signal 15 1,200 

General Manager, Baltimore. 12 3,750 

General Claim 12 800 

General Superintendent of 

Transportation 87 8,050 

Law 16 2,250 

Tax 12 1.800 

Cperating Vice-President . . . . 107 15,350 

Superintendent of Buildings. . 62 3.350 

Car Service.. 245 13,900 

Engineer, Bridges and Build- 
ings 11 1.000 

Commercial Freight Agent, 

Baltimore 9 650 

Maintenance of Way (Engi- 
neer) ' 19 2,700 

Purchasing Agent 67 4,550 

Stoorekeeping 20 1.050 

Real Estate 11 1.250 

President's Office 19 18,500 

Foreign Freight Office 9 650 

General Superintendent Mo- 
tive Power 49 4,000 

Traffic Vice-President 29 2,950 

Commercial Development .. . 34 5.300 

Engineering Department 77 13,150 

Treasury 3,550 

Traveling Auditors 2 400 

Electrical Department 15 1,950 

General Freight Office, Balti- 
more 39 12.050 

Co;il Traffic Department 12 2,200 

Freight Tariff 68 4,950 

Livestock 4 2.50 

Passenger 71 6,100 

Fuel 14 1,450 



TKE BALTLAIORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 



SUBSCKIBERS A.MOUXT 

Secretary's Office 4 900 

Superintendent Motive Power 7 1,000 

Accounting Vice-President .. . 10 3.600 

Dining Room 10 550 

Telegraph 76 9,450 

Relief ' 99 8.900 

Comptroller 6 1.000 

Custodian of R'ecords 7 350 

General Auditor 27 2.650 

Auditor Subsidiary Lines. .. . 6 850 

Auditor Freight Claims 282 17.200 

Auditor Revenue 24 3 , 600 

Auditor ^Miscellaneous Re- 
ceipts 35 2,250 

Auditor Disbursements 140 8,900 

Auditor Merchandise Re- 
ceipts 370 21,300 

Auditor, Coal and Coke 108 6,950 

Auditor Passenger Receipts. . 147 10.650 

Total 2^04 S245.700 



Number of employes in buildinz, 2.737. 

In compiling the above table credit 
was given the general offices only for 
subscriptions by those who are daily 
engaged there. For instance, the Legal 
Department reported twelve subscrip- 



tions for $2,250 by employes in the gen- 
eral offices, whereas fifty-four connected 
with that department subscribed for a 
total of $57,850. Again, the Timber 
Preservation Department, while its head- 
quarters are in Baltimore — Mt. Ro^^al 
Station — was not included. This de- 
partment had 133 subscribers who ap- 
plied for bonds to the extent of $12,400. 
The same applies to other departments. 

Among the miscellaneous reports not 
included in any of the above were the 
following: 

Subscribers Amount 



Martinsburg Shop 106 $6,500 

M. of W. Tunnel Forces 38 3.800 

26th Street Stores, New York. 9 950 

Blue Line Transfer Co 55 2,900 

Pittsburgh Warehouse 7 400 

Tobacco Warehouse 9 700 

Cincinnati Warehouse 5 1,700 

Supervisor Station Service. ... 13 2, 150 

Dining Car Department 249 15,700 

Printing Office, Mt. Clare 63 4,700 



554 $39,500 



J 4. . . „ „ . 4. - 

I 

} ' The Increase in the Cost of Materials — Present Prices 



Compared with 1914 Prices 



The table below shows a list of Maintenance of Way materials which are used 
in quantities by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Opposite each item of material 
is shown the present cost or value of the material which formerly cost one dollar, 
when purchased at the previous normal price. 

One dollar's worth of Angle Bars, now costs $1.91 

6ne dollar's worth of Track Bolts, now costs - 2.09 

One dollar's worth of Cement, now costs 1.74 

One dollar's worth of Anti-Rail Creepers, now costs 1.57 

One dollar's worth of Guard Rail Clamps, now costs 1.44 

One dollar's worth of Insulated Rail Joints, now osts 1.44 

One dollar's worth of Cross Ties, now costs 1.62 

One dollar's worth of Wire Nails, now costs 1.87 

One dollar's worth of Cement Coated Nails, now costs 3.24 

One dollar's worth of Linseed Oil, now costs 3.09 

One dollar's worth of Cast Iron Pipe, now costs 1.91 

One dollar's worth of Tie Plates, now costs 2.93 

One dollar's worth of Boat Spikes, now costs 3.89 

One dollar's worth of Track Spikes, now costs 2.89 

One dollar's worth of Track Shovels, now costs 2.08 

One dollar's worth of Stand Pipes, now costs 1.89 

One dollar's worth of Low Switch Stand, now costs 2.16 

One dollar's worth of Intermediate Switch Stand, now costs 2.11 

One dollar's worth of Circular Zincs, now costs 1.52 



— 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Of course, there was keen, but friendly, 
rivalry among employes, who made every 
effort to have their shop or office report 
the highest percentage. In Baltimore 
it was a ''nip and tuck" race between 
the general offices and the Mt. Clare 
shops. The former won out by one- 
half of one per cent., having a total of 
95 per cent, against 94.5 per cent, by the 
last named. 

On the divisions, committees worked 
day and night and all made an excellent 
showing, as is evident from the fol- 
lowing compilation: 

Subscribers 

New York Division... 1,879 

Philadelphia Division. . 1,302 

Baltimore Division 3,832 

Cumberland Division. . . 4,285 
Connellsville Division. . 
Pittsburgh Division. . . . 
New Castle Division. . . 
Monongah Division .... 

Wheeling Division 

Ohio River Division. . . . 

Cleveland Division 

Gen'l Sup't, Baltimore, 
Pittsb'gh and Wheeling 



247 
179 
553 
982 
255 
282 
347 

65 



Amount 
$113,550 

76,500 
212,950 
283,200 
276,450 
269,750 
163,800 
264,000 
148,650 
80,900 
147,050 

8,350 

Total, Lines East. . . 28,329 $1 , 931 , 600 

Newark Division 2,971 $212,000 

Chicago Division 3,917 266,150 

Toledo Division 4,152 288,500 

Ohio Division 2,085 164,250 

Indiana Division 1,245 124,950 

Illinois Division 2,588 175,700 

Sandy Valley & Elkhorn 62 11, 400 
Cincinnati Terminals, 

Northwest District. . . 953 57,700 
Cincinnati Terminals, 

Southwest District ... 1 , 008 67 , 150 
General Offices, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio 310 33,150 

Total, Lines West. . 19^91 $1,400,950 

The campaign among Baltimore and 
Ohio employes was inaugurated under 
the personal direction of President Wil- 
lard, who on April 15 called a conference 
at which vice-president Shriver presided 
and J. S. Murray, assistant to president, 
was appointed general chairman. The 
plans there outlined were put into effect 
imrriediat(;ly, and the same day members 
bearing full instructions left Baltimore for 
the various division points and before 
twenty-four hours had (^laps(M] division 
committees and sul)-coirunitte(;s were out 
among th(; m(^n soliciting subscriptions. 



E. V. Baugh, superintendent of dining 
cars, was assigned to the Philadelphia 
Division; W. E. Lowes, general passenger 
agent, to the Monongah, Wheeling and 
Ohio River Divisions; H. O. Hartzell, chief 
of industrial bureau, to the Connellsville, 
Pittsburgh and New Castle Divisions ; J. E. 
Spurrier to the Shenandoah and Cumber- 
land Divisions, and John T. Broderick, 
supervisor of special bureaus, to the Cleve- 
land, Chicago and Newark Divisions. 
Later, the System was toured by a number 
of speakers, who addressed shop meetings 
and town gatherings. Among these were 
W. W. Wood, George F. Sturmer and 
local counsel on all parts of the System. 

Following is a table of subscriptions 
by employes of the general offices. 
This does not include those who report 
to heads of departments located in the 
Baltimore and Ohio building, but whose 
duties require that they have offices on 
various parts of the System. 

Baltimore and Ohio Building 

Subscribers Amount 

Valuation 63 .%.500 

Signal 15 1.200 

General Manager, Baltimore. 12 3,750 

General Claim 12 800 

General Superintendent of 

Transportation 87 8,050 

Law 16 2,250 

Tax 12 1,800 

Operating Vice-President ... . 107 15,350 

Superintendent of Buildings . . 62 3 . 350 

Car Service 245 13,900 

Engineer, Bridges and Build- 
ings 11 1.000 

Commercial Freight Agent, 

Baltimore 9 650 

Maintenance of Way (Engi- 
neer) ■ 19 2.700 

Purchasing Agent 67 4,550 

Stoorekeeping 20 1,050 

Real Estate..." 11 1,250 

President's Office 19 18,500 

Foreign Freight Office 9 650 

General Superintendent Mo- 
tive Power 49 4.000 

Traffic Vice-President 29 2.950 

Commercial Development .. . 34 5.300 

Engineering Department 77 13.150 

Treasury 3Q 3,550 

Traveling Auditors 2 400 

Electrical Department 15 1,950 

General P>eight Office, Balti- 
more 39 12,050 

Coal Traffic Department .... 12 2. 200 

Freight Tariff 68 4.950 

Livestock J 250 

Passenger 71 6,100 

Fuel 14 1,450 



TKE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 





SUBSCBIBERS 


Amount 


Secretary's Office 


4 


900 


Superintendent Motive Power 7 


1,000 


Accounting Vice-Prcsideni: . 


10 


3,600 


Dining Room 


10 


550 


Telegraph 


76 


9,450 


Relief 


99 


8,900 


Comptroller •. . . 


6 


1,000 


Custodian of Records 


7 


350 


General Auditor 


27 


2.650 


Auditor Subsidiary Lines. . 


6 


850 






17,200 


Auditor Revenue 


24 


3,600 


Auditor Miscellaneous R 


e- 




ceipts 


35 


9 9^0 
Z , ZOK) 


Auditor Disbursements 


140 


8,900 


Auditor Merchandise Re- 






370 


21,300 


Auditor, Coal and Coke 
Auditor Passenger Receipts 


108 


6,950 


. 147 


10.650 


Total 


2^604 


$245,700 



Number of employes in buildinz, 2,737. 

In compiling the above table credit 
was given the general offices only for 
subscriptions by those who are daily 
engaged there. For instance, the Legal 
Department reported twelve subscrip- 



tions for $2,250 by employes in the gen- 
eral offices, whereas fifty-four connected 
with that department subscribed for a 
total of $57,850. Again, the Timber 
Preservation Department, while its head- 
quarters are in Baltimore — Mt. Royal 
Station — was not included. This de- 
partment had 133 subscribers who ap- 
plied for bonds to the extent of $12,400. 
The same applies to other departments. 

Among the miscellaneous reports not 
included in any of the above were the 
following: 

Subscribers Amount 



Martinsburg Shop 106 $6,500 

M. of W. Tunnel Forces 38 3,800 

26th Street Stores, New York. 9 950 

Blue Line Transfer Co 55 2,900 

Pittsburgh Warehouse 7 400 

Tobacco Warehouse 9 700 

Cincinnati Warehouse 5 1 , 700 

Superyisor Station Seryice. ... 13 2. 150 

Dining Car Department 249 15.700 

Printing Office, Mt. Clare 63 4.700 



554 $39,500 



«{.„ — ,„ — „„ — „. — .„ — „ — .„ — „ — ,„ — .„ — .„ — „„ — .„ — „ — ., — „._, — ,« — .„ — .„_. — .„ — «— — — - — ■■ — «—.»—". — 

The Increase in the Cost of Materials — Present Prices 
Compared with 1914 Prices 



The table below shows a list of Maintenance of Way materials which are used 
in quantities by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Opposite each item ot material 
is shown the present cost or value of the material which formerly cost one dollar, 
when purchased at the previous normal price. 

One dollar's worth of Angle Bars, now costs $1.91 

One dollar's worth of Track Bolts, pow costs * 2.09 

One dollar's worth of Cement, now costs 1.74 

One dollar's worth of Anti-Rail Creepers, now costs 1.57 

One dollar's worth of Guard Rail Clamps, now costs 1.44 

One dollar's worth of Insulated Rail Joints, now osts 1.44 

One dollar's worth of Cross Ties, now costs I.e2 

One dollar's worth of Wire Nails, now costs 1.87 

One dollar's worth of Cement Coated Nails, now costs 3.24 

One dollar's worth of Linseed Oil, now costs 3.09 

One dollar's worth of Cast Iron Pipe, now costs 1.91 

One dollar's worth of Tie Plates, now costs 2.93 

One dollar's worth of Boat Spikes, now costs 3.89 

One dollar's worth of Track Spikes, now costs 2.89 

One dollar's worth of Track Shovels, now costs 2.08 

One dollar's worth of Stand Pipes, now costs 1.89 

One dollar's worth of Low Switch Stand, now costs 2.16 

One dollar's worth of Intermediate Switch Stand, now costs 2.11 

One dollar's worth of Circular Zincs, now costs 1.52 

4. . — , „. . — , — — , , — , 4. f 

. . . . ^ 



94<^PerCeirt 

MlClare 

SUBSCRIBED TO 

THE 

THiRDHiiEnrloiui 

MsiiKcirnoiisI 

Sisaooo 



PUSH OUR CLOCK 
OVER THE TOP 

„ TO HELP DOWN THE 

KAISER AND HIS GANG 



Our AIM $125000.00! 

HELP POSH THE NAIDAROUIIDI 

SUBSCRIBE 



TO THE 



'^0 Third 

[IBE« _ 

.'to.ofo Loan 



-a. 



BAniESAREWONASNUCM 
AT HONE WITH UBERTTBONDS 
ASTHEYAREATTHEFROIT. 

APPUfC/IT/OlteWST B£/AfBrMJ(r4W 



lU 



Third Liberty Loan Subscriptions- 
Mount Clare 

□ L c □ lu in L, r ti c niiDiD □ mioiio in n n a a a uiqidii in t. □ [Q 



OH OP 


Number of 
Men 


Number of 
Subscriptions 


A ■MOTT'VT' 


Per 
Cent. 


13 1 


941 




<p;i4 0^0 on 

»PXt^ , \JO\J . \J\J 






IQQ 


loo 


1 1 400 00 


Q4 T 




9fi 




1 4=)0 00 

J. < rto\j . yjyj 


100 

X\J\J . \J 




fi7 


fi2 


Q nOO 00 


Q9 T 




<JO 


4S 


9 T^O 00 


89 8 




^0 

0\J 




Q S=iO 00 
o , oo\j . yjyj 


100 






10 


fiOO 00 

\J\J\J . \J\J 


100 




9Q 




1 "^00 00 


100 


No. 3 Machine 


77 


70 


4,150.00 


90.9 


Tool Room 


32 


32 


3,350.00 


100.0 


Small Tool Department 


29 


29 


2.650.00 


100.0 


"Mrw 9 IVTanViinci 




14fi 


c 0^0 00 


Q7 


Air Brake 


21 


21 


i; 100.00 


100.0 






■ Q4 


T '^00 00 
o . ouu . yjyj 


100 




9S 


2fi 


1 400 00 

X . rrV^U . \J\J 






1 9 


12 


700 00 


100 




lU 


14 

Art 


QOO 00 


88 




14Q 


144 


Q QOO 00 


96.6 




115 


109 


6 000 00 


94.8 




38 


38 


2 200 00 


100.0 


Flue Plant 


14 


13 


, 800.00 


92'0 


Re-rolling Mill 


14 


13 


650.00 


92.0 


Tender Paint 


29 


29 


2.950 00 


100.0 




14 


13 


700.00 


Q2 




72 


71 


4,000'00 


98.6 


Locomotive Department Total. . 


1,578 
=■ 


1,514 



193,500.00 


95 9 


Cabinet 


34 


34 


$1 , 800 . 00 


100.0 


Saw Mill 


13 


13 


650 . 00 


100.0 


Paint 


34 


34 


1 , 800 . 00 


100.0 


Paint H.".rdware 


13 


13 


700 . 00 


100.0 


Upholstery 


20 


20 


1,000.00 


100.0 


Passenger Erecting Shop 


. 49 


49 


2.750.00 


100.0 


Passenger Car Finishing 


91 


21 


1 inn on 

1 , iUU . uu 


ino n 


Freight Track 


232 


227 


12,500.00 


98.2 


Car Department Total. . /. 


416 


411 


$22,300.00 


98.8 


Miscellaneous 










Superintendent Shops' Office 


65 


61 


$9,300.00 


93.8 


Accounting Office 


39 


39 


2.900.00 


100.0 


Engineer of Tests 


42 


40 


4.100.00 


95.2 


Mechanical Engineer 


41 


41 


3,350.00 


100.0 


Stores Department 


265 


234 


12,100.00 


88.3 


Maintenance of Way Department.. 


132 


95 


5,050.00 


72.0 


Supervisor M. T. and P. W 


4 


4 


400.00 


100.0 


Grand Total 


2,582 


2,439 


$153,000.00 


94.5 



Prize Contest 

For the Two Best Articles on 
What I Am Doing to Help Win the War 



NOT since the days of the Revolution have the people of this republic 
been called upon to expend their resources as at the present time. Mars 
has crossed the ocean and has bid us enter the arena of war on the 
battlefields of France. The undertaking of this colossal part in the struggle 
for democracy means that all of us must do our part. Those who cannot go 
forth to meet the Hun in physical combat must do his part in other ways. 
Cur illustrious President has told us that we must down the Prussian war 
lords with force without stint or limit in order to make the world a decent 
place to live in. 

We did not invite this war — this war was forced upon us ! Insult after 
insult was hurled at this glorious republic, and to save our honor as a great 
nation we were bound to enter the conflict. Today finds us in the midst of 
the struggle. Our boys in khaki are dying on the battlefield in defense of 
the flag, and our boys in blue are defying Von Tirpitz's submarines and are 
helping to keep the Kaiser's fleet bottled up in the Kiel Canal. Many of our 
heroes have offered their lives on the altar of patriotism and those who 
survive are willing to do the same. 

Now, what are you doing to help win the war ? The Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad offers two prizes, $10 for the best article and $5 for the second 
best, to the two employes whose articles show that they are doing more 
toward winning the war than other members in the^ service. 

Rules 

The contest is open to all employes — male and female. 

All contributions must reach the office of the Employes 
Magazine not later than July 10, 1918. 

Articles based on theory will not be considered. You 
must tell what you have actually done. 

Literary merit of articles submitted will have no effect 
on the decision. " . 

Competitors must give their full name, address, occupa- 
tion, location and years of service. 

Write on one side of paper only. 

The final decision will rest with the Editor, Employes 
Magazine. 

Address all communications to 



Baltimore and Ohio Employes Magazine 
Mt. Royal Station, Baltimore, Md. 



Lieutenant Daniel Willard, Jr., Cited for 
Conspicuous Bravery Under Heavy Fire 

(From The Baltimore Sun) 



NlEWS came May 6 from the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Force in 
France that Lieutenant Daniel 
* — — ^ Willard, Jr., son of the president 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, had 
been cited for conspicuous bravery. It 
was stated in the dispatches that he and 
Andrew Thompson, of New England, had 
continued to handle the guns under 
heavy fire from the Germans when 
there was imminent danger of being 
killed. 

The news that Daniel Willard, Jr., 
had been mentioned in the dispatches 
from France for conspicuous bravery in 
that,, at the battle of Seicheprey, on April 
21, he worked his guns for five hours 
under heavy fire was the first news 
friends of Lieutenant Willard had re- 
ceived as to just where he was stationed 
in France. 

The battle of Seicheprey was one of 
the most hotly-contested actions in 
which the American troops have been 
engaged. Lieutenant Willard and An- 
drew Thompson were praised for the 
courage they displayed in handling their 
guns. 

On that day the Germans began a 
bombardment of the American lines, 
which was intended to pulverize them 
and make easy the attack by their in- 
fantry. The American artillery in this 
section has been conspicuous for its 
deadly work ever since it took up a posi- 
tion in that part of the line. Every 
time the Germans attempted to reach 
the American lines they had been 
stopped by a terrific fire from the Ameri- 
can guns. 

■ lllllllllllllO I 1 [] IJ „„„ 



On this day the work of the German 
artillery was unusually heavy and deadly. 
They followed it by sending a whole 
regiment of Saxons across No Man's 
Land, supported by storm troops. The 
Germans succeeded in reaching the Amer- 
ican infantry and got temporary pos- 
session of the village of Seicheprey. In 
a counter-attack the Americans retook 
the village and drove them back to their 
own trenches. Four hundred German 
dead were left on the field and the Ameri- 
can losses were heavier than they had 
been in any one battle up to that time. 

Mr. Willard's son was in the thick of 
that fighting, and the dispatch shows 
what a good account he gav^e of himself. 
Meagre news of his part in it had reached 
this city, but- the message by General 
Pershing to the War Department, in 
which thirty-one Americans were praised 
for the soldierly qualities they displayed 
has been sufficient to cause many con- 
gratulations to reach President and Mrs. 
Willard at their home in Roland Park. 

Lieutenant Willard is attached to the 
One Hundred and Second Field Ar- 
tillery, Fifty-first Brigade, which is a 
part of the New England Division. He 
was a student at Yale University in 
1916 when the trouble with Mexico 
began. He entered the artillery, going 
to Tobyhanna for training with a Yale 
University group. After this country 
entered the war he went to the first 
Fort Meyer training camp and was 
graduated from it as a second lieutenant 
of artillery. Within a few weeks after 
his graduation he was in France. He 
has many friends in this city. 



Contribute to the Red Cross War Fund 



13 



SUPERVISION AND OFi<ICE FORCE 




S. S. Tuckahoe, "Wonder Ship'' of Emergency 
Fleet Corporation, Loaded at Our Curtis 
Bay Coal Pier in Record Time 



■ i iniiiniiiiiiiiiiiicihiiniiiii:)iuiiiiiiijiniiiiiiiiiiiic»iti iicii iiriic iiiiiiaiiiiiiniiiioiiiuiiiiiiin iiiiuiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiii am iiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiaHiiiiiiiiiitiuiiiiiiiiiia iiiiiiaiiiiiiniiiicwiiiiiiiiiiaiiiHiiniiiaiiiiiiiiiinc ■ 

I LOADING TIME OF S. S. TUCKAHOE | 

I May 17, Norfolk & Western Railway Pier, Lambert's Point, Va 6 hours | 

I May 25. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Pier, Curtis Bay, Md. . 2 hours, 50 minutes j 



H T our new Curtis Bay coal pier, 
Baltimore, another record was 
established May 25, when the 
S. S. Tuckahoe, the ^'wonder ship" 
of the United States Shipping Board 
Emergency Fleet Corporation, was loaded 
in two hours and fifty minutes. In that 
short time 4,803 tons of cargo and 189 
tons of bunker coal were placed aboard. 
Less than three hours elapsed from the 
time the Tuckahoe docked and the time 
she departed. 

The eyes of the shipping world were 
centered on Curtis Ba^^ while the Tucka- 
hoe was there. And when she sailed 
there was joy supreme. It was her 
second cargo, and when one considers 
that the keel of this steel vessel was laid 
April 8, 1918, her histor}^ is a remarkable 
one. 

A glance at the log of the Tuckahoe 
reveals the following: Keel laid April 8, 
1918, at Camden, N. J. ; launched twenty- 
seven days later; ready for sea May 15; 
sailed from Camden May 16; arrived at 
Hampton Roads, Va., May 17; sailed 
from Hampton Roads with first cargo 
May 18; unloaded at Boston and sailed 
for Baltimore May 22; arrived at Curtis 
Bay, loaded and sailed May 25. Conse- 
quently, the title "wonder ship." 

The first cargo was sent aboard at the 
Norfolk & Western Railway coal pier at 
Lambert's Point, Va. Six hours were 
required to load her. The second cargo 
from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
Curtis Bay pier was placed in her hold in 
two hours and fifty minutes. 

When the Tuckahoe docked at the 
Baltimore and Ohio pier, E. J. Thomas, 
superintendent of the pier, and his force 
were ready. W. W. Tingle, dispatch 
agent of the Emergency Fleet Corpora- 



tion, was on hand to watch the perform- 
ance and acted as official timekeeper. 
J.J. McSweeney, traffic agent of the New 
England Fuel & Transportation Com- 
pany, by which the vessel has been 
chartered, and several Baltimore and Ohio 
officials were also present. 

The Tuckahoe docked at 9.15 a. m. 
The instant she was made fast Mr. 
Thomas gave the signal and coal began 
to pour into her hold. Dumping was 
completed at 11.55 a. m. and at 12.05 
trimming was finished. At 12.12 noon 
the Tuckahoe, with a tug alongside, pulled 
out into the stream. 

A comprehensive article on the new 
Curtis Bay coal pier appeared in the June, 
1917, issue of the Magazine. If you 
have not read it get a copy. 

The men employes on the pier at the 
time the Tuckahoe was loaded were: 
W. W. Heaps, chief electrician, who is in 
charge of the maintenance of the pier; 
R. I. Spears and R. P. Jones, electricians; 
S. R. Taylor, machinist; L. H. Huges, 

G. W. C. Herzberger, W. C. Tull, J. H. 
Peters, William H. Gardner and M. Leis- 
ter, car dump operators; C. L. Wright, 

H. Smith, W. 0. Smith, W. C. Norris and 
W. A. Mohr, tower operators; W. V. 
Thomas, Alex. Sulme, C. Graef, J. Armi- 
ger, Elmer Heaps, A. J. Kadan and C. 
Alden, oilers. 

The supervision and office force is com- 
posed of E. J. Thomas, superintendent; 
N. J. Johnson, assistant superintendent; 
J. H. Kenney, foreman; A. J. Trogler, 
clerk; T. J. Brady, clerk, and J. Counters, 
clerk. The trimming force, composed of 
more than 100 men, was in charge of 
John Minor and George Murray, fore- 
men, ?.nd William Z. Rice and Arthur 
Graham, assistant foremen. 



15 




16 



Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Y. M. C. A., 
Cumberland, Md., Goes *^Over the Top" 



Spring Drive for One Thousand Members a Huge Success After 
a Week of Strenuous Work by **Army'' and **Navy" 



must be successful in this drive. 
One thousand members means 
going ^over the top.' " This was 
the message dehvered to mem- 
bers of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
Y. M. C. A., Cumberland, Md., on the 
evening of April 5, when they assembled 
to plan for .a great spring drive to secure 
new associates for their organization. 
The campaign ran from April 8 to 15, and 
the result, shown in detail on page 19, 
indicates that they penetrated the third 
line trenches of the ''enemy" and cap- 
tured 1,143. 

What makes the victory the more re- 
markable is the fact that the local Y. M. 
C. A. at Cumberland had just finished a 
strenuous campaign, which had a very 
successful ending. The Baltimore and 
Ohio men, however, had received orders 
to proceed at once and they came through 
on time. 

While the excellent achievement was 
due to the splendid work of the various 
teams, divided into two sections — Army 
and Navy — too much credit cannot be 
given to those who did the preliminary 
planning. Among one of the most per- 
sistent in making the drive a success was 
W. C. Montignani, secretary of the or- 
ganization, who, with his usual modesty, 
would not permit his name to appear 
in the line-up. 

The War Department had the ''land 
fighting forces in the trenches" and the 
Navy Department gave the signal to 
"clear decks for action," on April 5, at 
a dinner in the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road "Y" Building. Before partaking 



of some "chow" the final plans were 
gone over by John T. Broderick, super- 
visor of special bureaus; H. 0. Williams, 
international secretary Railroad Y. M. 
C. A.; G. D. Brooke, superintendent 
Cumberland Division; F. P. Pfahler, 
master mechanic; F. F. Hanly, division 
engineer; Daniel Annan, president of the 
Second National Bank, and Tasker G. 
Lowndes, vice-president of that institu- 
tion, all of whom made stirring addresses. 
The last two named, while not asso- 
ciated with the Company, always take 
a deep interest in the welfare of Baltimore 
and Ohio employes and are ever ready and 
willing to do their bit for a railroader. 

The speeches were interspersed with 
several entertaining features. Professor 
H. Paul Mann., representative of The 
Holland Company, gave an organ re- 
cital; the Baltimore and Ohio Cum- 
berland Shop Glee Club, under the leader- 
ship of C. L. Colley, made a decided hit 
with various selections and J. W. Steven- 
son, who presided at the piano, received 
warm applause. The supper was served 
by members of the Ladies' Bible Class 
of the Southminster Presbyterian Church 
and it was all that could be desired. 

On the following Monday, April 8, the 
battle began. Bright and early a heavy 
barrage was laid down. The artillery 
did noble work. At the right moment 
the infantry and cavalry took a hand, 
with the support of. the signal corps, 
aviation corps and the engineers. Mean- 
time the medical corps was kept busy. 

If anyone doubts the need of cavalry 
in these days just glance at the total 



17 



18 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



''captured" during the week by '' Gen- 
eral'' C. E. McGann, assistant master 
mechanic, with the assistance of ''Cap- 
tain" H. M. Hutson and others assigned 
to that branch. The engineers com- 
manded by "General" L. 0. Miller, of 
the car department, reported 86 "pris- 
oners." Fifty-four was the total for 
the artillery directed by "General" A. W. 
Bratt, while the medical corps in charge 
of "General" E. F. Tracy, foreman air- 
brake room, rendered first aid to 42. 
"General" W. R. Earle, assistant master 
mechanic, with his artillery men made 
40 bullseyes and 33 heeded the wig-wag 
of the signal corps under the leadership 
of "General" C. L. Colley. Thirty-two 
were brought down by "General" C. C. 
Chandler and other aviators, while the 
infantry under "General" C. H. Spicer 
went "over the top" and brought back 
27. 

And the navy! Shades of John Paul 
Jones, Farragut and Dewey. How each 
jack tar did work! They swept the 
"sea" (C) of Cumberland clean. When 
the word was given to cease firing they 
had scored 692 hits. Following out a 
modern practise the navy did a little 
camouflaging. The commissary depart- 
ment, which should have been called the 
heavy battleship division, scored 298 
of this total. "Major" G. A. McGinn, 
secretary to the superintendent; "Cap- 
tain" G. R. Bramble, "Lieutenant" J. C. 
Baldwin, "Sergeant-Major" W. H. Lynn 
and "Corporal" J. R. M. Rees drew the 
"enemy" out by spreading propaganda 
filled with visions of soft berths only to 
lay them low. 



The submarine division under "Rear 
Admiral" E. C. Groves, trainmaster, 
made "Y's" out of 162 "U's." "En- 
sign" L. Cramblett, of the "subs," 
proved that he was no novice at the 
game. Next in line came the marines, 
who would rather fight than eat, and 
their commander, "General" I. S. Spon- 
seller, supervisor, compelled 48 to sur- 
render. Close behind were the ship 
builders, "Commodore" A. J. Kelly, 
with a total of 43 "launched" safely. 

The mine sweepers, "Commodore" 
M. A. Carney, road foreman of engines, 
Keyser, and the coast guard, "Rear 
Admiral" L. J. Wilmoth, road foreman 
of engines, Cumberland, tied with 40 
each. C. Montzer, rated as a gunner 
with the coast guard, did fine work. 
"Commodore" J. A. Miller, in command 
of the cruisers, reported 28 captures and 
"Commodore" W. S. Toomey, train- 
master, Connellsville Division, reported 
a total of 25 for the transports. 

Space will not permit going into de- 
tail to tell of the splendid efforts of every 
individual on the various committees. 
Let it suffice that all did their best — 
"and angels can do no more." The 
week of April 8 to 15 marks an epoch in 
the history of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Y. M. C. A. at Cumberland. 
May its future be guided by the same 
unselfish zeal displayed on this occasion. 

Last, but not least, every Baltimore 
and Ohio man at that point expresses 
deep appreciation for the whole-hearted 
cooperation given by the citizens of that 
section who helped them to go "over 
the top." 



Railroad Y. M. C. A. at Brunswick, Md., Does Fine 
Work During Year Ending March 31 



OHIO following is a summary of the 
excel If^nt results ol)tained by the 
l:Jaltirnore .and Ohio Jlailroad 
Y. M. C. A. at Brimswick, Md., 
for the year ending March 31, 1918: 

Membership during that period, 703; 
attendance for the year, 260,823; daily 



average, 715; total number occupying 
sleeping rooms, 34,318; daily average, 94: 
total baths taken, 13,291; daily average, 
36; total meals served, 161,346; daily 
average, 442; total games of bowling, 
31,057; free beds were given to 130 and 
free meals to 390. 



GREAT SPRING DRIVE FOR 1,000 MEMBERS 
BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD Y. M. C. A., CUMBERLAND, MD., APRIL 8-15 



Commander-in-Chief G. D. Brooke 

Army — Captured 451 

Secretary of War F. P. Pfahler 
Adjutant H. S. Larib 

Cavalry 125 

General C. E. McGann 
Captain H. M. Hutson 
First Lieutenant E. A. Hansrote 
Second Lieutenant C. C. Bowden 
Sergeant C. D. Rinker 
Corporal J. E. Giles 

Infantry 27 

General C. H. Spicer 
Captain S. H. Russler 
First Lieutenant L. R. Ambrose 
Second Lieutenant C. W. Twigg 
Sergeant G. H. Little 
Corporal W. E. Manse 

Artillery 40 

General W. R. Earle 

Captain S. H. Store r 

First Lieutenant R. C. Young 

Second Lieutenant G. M. Fazenbaker 

Sergeant D. E. Linn 

Corporal A. Y. Wilson 

Field Artillery 54 

General A. W. Bratt 
Captain J. G. Diffibaugh 
First Lieutenant H. H. Wageley 
Second Lieutenant H. E. Childs 
Sergeant J. W. Ste\^nson 
Corporal G. F. Hansrote 

Medical Corps 

General E. F. Trace y 
First Lieutenant M. G. Light 
Second Lieutenant A. R. Douglass 
Sergeant H. S. Myers 
Corporal J. S. Clarke 

Signal Corps 

General C. L. Colley 
First Lieutenant E. F. Warner 
Second Lieutenant D. R. Murray 
Sergeant J. R. Miller. 
Corporal E. R. Fisher 

Aviation Corps 

General C. C. Chandler 
First Lieutenant S. E. Hutson 
Second Lieutenant J. Gorman 
Sergeant B. O. Rafter 
Corporal L. R. Thuss 



42 



33 



32 



86 



Engineers 

General L. O. Miller 

First Lieutenant E. F. Davis 

Second Lieutenant T. E. Youngblood 

Sergeant E. E. Dean 

Corporal W. B. Tansell 



Chief of Staff H. W. Grenoble 

Navy— Captured 692 

Secretary of the Navy F. F. Hanly 
Admiral E. C. Dratvbaugh 

Marines 48 
General I. S. Sponseller 
Captain A. O. Teprick 
First Lieutenant J. G. Lester 
Second Lieutenant D. E. 'Alexander 
Sergeant J. Clay 
Corporal T. A. Laffey 

Coast Guard 40 
Rear Admiral L. J. Wilmoth 
Captain H. P. Brant 
Lieutenant T. Denem 
Ensign O. Thomson 
Gunner H. Powers 
Gunner C. Montzer 

Submarines 



Rear Admiral E. C. Gro\"es 
Captain W. C. Baker 
Lieutenant C. F. Moehle 
Ensign L. C. Cramblett 
Gunner W. E. Yarnell 
Commissary 
Major G. A. McGinn 
Captain G. R. Bramble 
Lieutenant J. C. Baldwin 
Sergeant-Major W. H. Lynn 
Corporal J. R. M. Rees 

Mine Sweepers 
Commodore M. A. Carney 
Captain W. E. Cheshire 
Lieutenant J. A. Garlitz 
Mate B. J. Marks 
Gunner R. E. Fury 

Transports 
Commodore W. S. Toomey 
Captain J. F. Englecka 
Lieutenant W. Dodson 
Mate B. Gulick 
Gunner I. E. Jacobs - 
Gunner W. Hetrick 

Cruisers 
Commodore J. A. Miller 
Captain A. D. Whitehair 
Lieutenant W. F. Matthews 
Mate J. E. Gary 
Gunner E. G. Shirley 
Gunner B. Maser 

Ship Builders 
Commodore A. J. Kelly 
Captain R. T. Tibler 
Lieutenant J. F. Mackin 
Mate W. S. Beggs 
Gunner C. P. Arnold 
Gunner V. L. Connell 



162 



298 



40 



25 



28 



43 



Illllllll The American Red Cross llllii 

llllllllllilllllillill ' ' illlillllllllllllllllillll 

■lill What It Is and What It Does liHi 



Origin of the Red Cross 

What is the Red Cross? 

It is the world's international ideal of 
mercy. It knows no bounds of racial, 
religious or political separation. Where- 
ever and whenever war, pestilence, storm, 
flood or disaster has wrought suffering, 
want or distress, there it has gone and 
brought relief, and the ready hands of 
unselfish aid. 

Who first organized relief for those wounded, 
sick or neglected on the field of battle? 

The Knights Hospitallers during the 
crusades. This organization, which had 
its birth in the hospital of St. John at 
Jerusalem, although driven out of the 
Holy Land by the Moslems, re-estab- 
lished itself at Malta and is still in exist- 
ence. 

What nation first organized such relief? 

Oreat Britain during the Crimean "War 
when Florence Nightingale was sent by 
the War Office in 1854 to the hospitals of 
Scutari. When Miss Nightingale, with 
thirty-eight other nurses, reached Scutari, 
she found pest houses rather than hospi- 
tals, with open sewers beneath the build- 
ings. Contagions were taking men by 
the thousand. So successful was Miss 
Nightingale in bringing order out of 
chaos that she is recognized today as one 
of th(j groatf;st individual organizers of 
war relief. 

Who first conceived such service on an 
international basis? 

Henri Dunant, a Swiss physician, on 
the battlefield of Solferino, Italy, in 1859, 
organized a group of voluntcH'rs to help 
him minister to the wounded. At that 
i'uno gr(;at confusion jaid consequcmt 



inefficiency prevailed because of the 
multiplicity of relief flags. As a result 
of these experiences, and under the in- 
spiration of the work of Florence Nightin- 
gale, Dr. Dunant formulated the first 
proposals for an international organi- 
zation to care for the sick and wounded 
in time of war, and suggested, two years 
later, to the Geneva Society of Public 
Utilities, a single and uniform hospital 
flag for all nations. 

When was the Red Cross organized? 

In 1864 an International Conference 
of fourteen nations was held in Geneva, 
Switzerland, the outcome of which was 
the Treaty of Geneva, known as the 
Red Cross Treaty. 

What, in brief, does the Red Cross Treaty 
provide? 

That hospital formations and their 
personnel should be treated as neutrals. 

That each nation signing the Treaty 
should have an association of volunteers 
to assist and supplement the medical 
services of its army. 

That the emblem of service common to 
all nations should be a cross of red on a 
field of white. (This emblem, which is 
the Swiss flag with the colors reversed, 
was adopted in recognition of the fact 
that Dr. Dunant was Swiss, and that the 
Red Cross was founded at Geneva.) 

In what country was organized voluntary 
relief for armies in the field first recog- 
nized? 

In the United States during the Civil 
War, the United States Sanitary Com- 
mission was organized to assist the Army 
Medical Bureau in preserving and re- 
storing the health and S(^curing the 
general comfort of the soldiers. 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MACxAZINE 



21 



What effect did this Sanitary Commission 
have on the establishment of an Inter- 
national Red Cross organization? 

Delegates representing the United 
States Sanitary Commission were sent 
to the Geneva Conference, and were able 
to demonstrate by their report and by 
photographs how practical and efficient 
the work of this commission had been, 
thus allaying the fears of those who 
thought the plans proposed impracticable 
and impossible. 

How long was the United States Sanitary 
Commission in existence? 

Nearly five years. It ceased to exist 
at the end of the Civil War. 

When, and in what way, was the Red Cross 
given official sanction in the United States? 

A Red Cross organization was incor- 
porated in the District of Columbia in 
July, 1881, under the name of "The 
American Association of the Red Cross," 
of which Miss Clara Barton was president. 
The Treaty of Geneva was confirmed by 
the United States Senate in March, 1882. 
In June, 1900, the American Red Cross 
was incorporated by act of Congress, 
and in January, 1905, it was re-incor- 
porated and granted a new charter, the 
one now in force. The present charter 
provides for a permanent governing 
body, called the Central Committee, 
numbering eighteen persons. The Ameri- 
can Red Cross is now national in its 
scope and "standing. 

The Red Cross Organization in 
> the United States 

What is the relation of the American Red 
Cross to the United States Government? 

The American Red Cross is not a 
Government Department; it is a relief 
organization with government sanction, 
and, as such, assists the army and navy 
whenever called upon to help care for the 
wounded and suffering. President Wil- 
son is its president, not as is often thought 
by virtue of his office as President of the 
United States, but by election of the 
Central Committee. Representatives of 
the State, Treasury, War, Justice and 



Navy Departments are members of the 
Central Committee. All Red Cross 
accounts are audited by the War De- 
partment and an annual report is made 
to Congress by the Secretary of War. 

What is the present organization of the 
American Red Cross? 

It consists of a National Headquarters 
in Washington, thirteen division head- 
quarters in thirteen large centers of the 
United States and one in Washington 
in charge of territory outside of the 
United States; approximately 3,500 
chapters, with about 15,000 branches 
and a great many auxiliaries; an adult 
membership of over 22,000,000 and a 
juniormembership of several million school 
children. These chapters, branches, aux- 
iliaries and members represent the great 
producing force of the Red Cross during 
the war. 

What is the function of National Head- 
quarters? 

The function of National Headquarters, 
is the determination of policy and broad 
supervision of Red Cross activities. All 
home activities are directed through the 
fourteen divisions. The work abroad 
is carried on by the War Council through 
commissions in all the allied countries. 
(See note below.) 

What is the function of the Fourteen Divi- 
sion Headquarters? 

They are the mediums of authority 
and communication between national 
headquarters and the chapters under 
their jurisdiction. 

What is the function of a Chapter? 

A chapter is a local organization which 
is responsible, subject to the supervision 
and direction of the division manager, 



Note — The new Red Cross building in Washington is now 
used for National Headquarters. This building, erected as 
a monument to the Red Cross, was complpted in May, 1917, 
at a total cost, including grounds, of $800,000. Of this sum 
the United States Congress appropriated one-half, and four 
individual donors the other half. Special interior decorations 
were furnished by a single donor. A beautiful motive is shown 
in a $10,000 gift for the memorial windows; one-half by the 
Woman's Relief Corps, and one-half by the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy. On the other hand, a beautiful tribute 
is expressed in dedicating the building to the Women of the 
North and the Women of the South by a United Country. 
This building is more than a monument; it is a practical 
office building as well. 



22 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



for all Red Cross activities under its 
jurisdiction and with authority to es- 
tablish within its territory branches and 
auxiliaries. 

What is the function of a Branch? 

A branch is a subordinate part of a 
chapter with its own office, its own 
membership and with jurisdiction over 
part of the territory controlled by the 
chapter. It is organized for the purpose 
of increasing the effectiveness of Red 
Cross work in the community by local- 
izing authority. The branch is a per- 
manent organization. 

What is the function of an Auxiliary? 

An auxiliary is a temporary organi- 
zation composed of a group of individuals, 
usually a club, school, church society or 
other organization, who are members of 
the Red Cross. It is formed within the 
jurisdiction of the chapter or branch for 
the purpose of doing one or more specified 
kinds of work. 

JUNIOR RED CROSS MEMBERSHIP 
What is the Junior Red Cross Membership? 

The Junior Red Cross membership is 
the mobilization of school children and 
teachers into auxiliaries for Red Cross 
activities through the school organization. 

What is the purpose of the Junior Red Cross 

To give the 22,000,000 school children 
of the United States: 

(a) Training in the permanent duties 
of good citizenship. 

(6) An opportunity to do actual work 
to help win the war. 

How does a school become an auxiliary? 

Any school, with the permission of its 
principal, may become an auxiliary upon 
application to the School Cyommittec 
of the local Red ('ross Chapter and paying 
dues ()(\u'd\ to tw(;nty-five cents for each 
f)Upil, or giving a pledge of loyal s(»rvice. 

Who is eligible for membership in Junior 
Red Cross? 

Any public, private or parochial school, 
or other recogniz(;(l educational organi- 
zation in the Unitcnl States may join as 



a unit. The school or other organiza* 
tion joins, not for individual students 
and teachers, but for all of its members. 
The dues are paid by the school as a 
whole. 

What does the School Auxiliary do? 

The School Auxiliary, in cooperation 
with the local Red Cross Chapter, carries 
on Red Cross activities adapted to its 
educational program, such as: 

(a) Studies — learning the history and 
meaning of the Red Cross; learning 
patriotic significance of all school studies. 

(b) Supply Service — particularly in the 
vocational classes, where the boys learn 
to supply local Red Cross workrooms and 
hospitals and the girls learn to apply 
cookery ^nd sewing to war-time emer- 
gencies. 

(c) Community activities — salvage, 
clean-up campaigns, health crusades, etc. 

Red Cross Work in America 

What in general are the phases of Red Cross 
work in America? 

(a) Preparation for Relief Work in 
Europe. 

(6) Work among Soldiers and Sailors 
in this Country. 

(c) Work among our CiviUan Popu- 
lation . 

(d) Maintaining and Administering 
Funds for Work at Home and Abroad. 

PREPARATION FOR RELIEF WORK 
IN EUROPE 

How does the Red Cross cooperate with the 
Government in preparation for Relief Work 
in Europe? 

('hiefly in the following ways: By 
organizing Base Hospitals, Ambulance 
Companies and Naval Hospital Units 
and turning them over to the War De- 
partment ; by enrolling nurses and or- 
ganizing them into units for service; and 
l)y the mobilization and administration 
of volunteer effort for manufacturing 
relief supplies. 

What is a Base Hospital? 

As organized by the Red C'ross, a Base 
Hospital is composed normally of a medi- 
cal staff of twenty-three physicians and 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



23 



surgeons and two dental surgeons ; a staff 
of sixty-five Red Cross nurses with a 
reserve of fifteen nurses; and 153 men of 
the enlisted Reserve Corps. A Base Hos- 
pital when equipped with personnel, beds, 
furniture and supplies, is a complete hos- 
pital in everything except the building. 
The approximate cost of organizing and 
equipping is $75,000. Each organization 
is capable of conducting a hospital of 
500 beds. 

Does the Red Cross operate Base Hospitals? 

No. Base Hospitals are organized and 
turned over to the Army Medical Corps 
for service in France or to the Navy 
Medical Corps for service where needed. 
Each division of the army in France has 
one Base Hospital. When called into 
active service the Base Hospital becomes 
part of the Army or Navy Medical Corps 
of the United States. 

How many Base Hospitals has the Red Cross 
organized since the United States entered 
the war? 

Up to March 1, 1918, fifty had been 
organized for the Army and five for the 
Navy. Already a number of these are 
in active service in France. 

What is an Ambulance Company? 

It is an organization of five officers, 119 
enhsted men; with twelve motor ambu- 
lances of four litters each, three trucks, 
three motor cycles and one touring car. 
The approximate cost of equipping an 
ambulance company is $35,000. Forty- 
five ambulance companies have been 
organized by Red Cross Chapters. Some 
of these have been assigned to camps and 
cantonments and some re-organized by 
the Government for work in France. 
Four ambulance companies are assigned 
to service with each Base Hospital. 

What is a Naval Hospital Unit? 

A Naval Unit, which is similar in 
character to a Base Hospital, is made up 
of five medical men, twenty-one nurses 
and twenty-nine enlisted men, detailed 
for service at Naval Stations. Hospital 
Units, may, however, be assigned to 
emergency work on hospital trains and 
ships. 



How does the Red Cross provide Nursing 
Service for the Government? 

By enrolling nurses and by organizing 
them into units for service at the call of 
the Army and Navy Departments. Thus 
the Red Cross nurses constitute a reserve 
for the Army and Navy Nurse Corps. 

Does the Red Cross conduct a Professional 
School for Nurses? 

No. It accepts graduates of approved 
hospitals. 

What has the Red Cross done in supplying 
nurses for the War? 

On March 1, 1918, eighteen thousand 
two hundred nurses had been enrolled by 
the Red Cross. Of these, five thousand 
seven hundred and thirty-five were en- 
gaged in active nursing service at home 
and abroad; twelve hundred were doing 
teaching and committee work; and ap- 
proximately five thousand were enrolled 
with special units for immediate service. 
The present average rate of enrollment is 
1,000 nurses a month. By a recent esti- 
mate of the Surgeon General's office, 
about 40,000 nurses may be needed for 
our army alone during the present year, 
and the alUes are depending upon us to 
supplement their nursing service. The 
Red Cross is making an earnest effort 
to meet the demand. 

Who pays the salaries of the Red Cross 
Nurses? 

When nurses are turned over by the 
Red Cross to the government for military 
duty, they become members of the Army 
or Navy Nurse Corps and are placed on 
the government payroll. Nurses not in 
the government service who are assigned 
to regular Red Cross duties are paid by 
the Red Cross. 

In addition to War Relief Work, what does 
Red Cross Nursing Service comprehend? 

The Red Cross assigns nurses to disas- 
ter and emergency relief work whenever 
needed and supplies nurses upon request of 
the United States Public Health Service. 
It conducts a Town and County Nursing 
Service and offers educational courses in 
^'Elementary Hygiene and Home Care 
of the Sick" and in ''Home Dietetics." 
{To be continued) 



A Flying Chip is as Dangerous as a Shell 
Fragment — Wear Your Goggles! 



fjtf y jN one of his war narratives Arthur 
Cfl 1 1 Guy Empey relates an incident 
15553 which should make a deep im- 

I '^TO pression on all employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio who are required to 
use frog^hfi while at their work. 

While Emp(iy was an inmate of a 
hospital he saw a badly mutilated Tommy 
being })orn(; on a stretcher into the in- 
stitution. When he had been placed in 
his cot a kind nurse sat on the side of 
the bed. There were tears in her eyes 
and her lips were trembling. Empey's 
eyes, too, were moist. 

8(;veral times h(; asked the nurse when 
hf woiihl be shipped back to ''Blighty." 
The nurse, in a soothing vo'wa), told him 
he should not worry ai>out home, but 
that he should sl(;(!p and rest. After his 
th(>ughts of home and people had van- 
ished he n^qucsted that the lights be 
switched on. It was then that tears 



trickled down the pale cheeks of the 
nurse. Again she requested him to be 
quiet, but he insisted that those lights 
be turned on. After a painful silence the 
injured man snored loudly and imme- 
diately afterwards a groan, unearthly in 
its sadness, escaped him. He had 
realized that the light of day had been 
blotted out forever. Early the following 
morning he did go to ''Blighty," but 
not the "Blighty" he had anticipated. 
He had gone where heroes go after death. 

Now, you who are required to use 
your goggles at work, put yourself in 
the position of that Britisher. Imagine^ 
that you are suddenly blinded. Suppose 
the smiling face of your motluu", or your 
wife or your dear little child had been 
blott(;d out forever. Ah, God! what 
wouldn't you offer to regain your sight ? 

Let that dying gi'oan reach your ears 
when 3^ou begin a job. 



24 



Letters From France 



TiHE valorous spirit of the Balti- 
more and Ohio boys who are now 
"over there" is shown by the 
following letters and extracts re- 
ceived recently. Although the war game 
is new to them, they have gone into 
the struggle like veterans and have proved 
themselves true representatives of the 
flag and the nation. In the fight for 
democracy and a permanent, honorable 
peace they are earning for themselves 
eternal glory in the nation's history. 

While reading one of the letters we 
were coming to the point which we 
thought would be of deep interest when, 
alas! it was discovered that the censor's 
scissors had separated us from what we 
think would have fascinated us. The 
cruel, cruel censor! But we must abide 
by the powers that be. Here are the 
communications received from the boys: 
France, April 21, 1918. 

Dear Mr. Milholland: 

Your letter of March 9 finally reached 
me after traveling all over France. It pleased 
me immensely and I certainly do appreciate 
3^our thoughtfulness in dropping me a line. 
Today I also received one from Stanley Biscoe, 
announcing the birth of a daughter, and one 
from Mr. Webber, of the Law Department. 

Since sending you the postal card, several 
months ago, I have had some wonderful and 
exciting experiences. I was fortunate enough 
to receive orders to move to Paris, for station 
with Genral Atterbury's Headquarters, who, 
as you know, is the Director General of Trans- 
portation. (By the way, Paris is the only 
place which we are permitted to mention in our 
letters.) I remained there just about one 
month. While there I was assigned as secre- 
tary to the Deputy Director General of Trans- 
portation. During my stay in that city about 
four air raids took place and later on the Boches 
began to play on the city with their long range 
gun. Of course, these were excitable times, 
and I could not begin to describe in a letter 
all that went on. I enjoyed my stay in that 
city immensely and made visits to many places 
of interest. It sure is a wonderful city. How- 
ever, I was again transferred to a new station. 
I am still with the same officer, but he has been 
promoted to a new and more important po- 
sition and, glad to say, he was good enough to 
take me with him. He is now in charge of the or- 
ganization of a new and large department, which 
includes all railroad transportation as one of its 
divisions, and the work is most interesting. 



I have been fortunate enough to meet quite a 
few fellows from Baltimore so far. One of 
them is our friend, Walter Price. He is in our 
department and I see him quite often. Also 
Fred Miller, who was secretary to Auditor 
Passenger Receipts. One fellow is here with 
us by the name of Naughton — he was formerly 
secretary to Maj^or Preston. So from all of 
this you can see that we are not so lonesome, 
and it does not seem so far away from home 
after all. Please tell Jim that his brother 
is in the best of health, and seems to enjoy 
himself very much, as do all of us. Only last 
night I was informed that about two hundred 
new arrivals are here and that they are from 
Camp Meade, so I suppose we will meet some 
more of our acquaintances. One cannot tell 
who he is going to meet next over here. I ran 
into Fred Miller one night in Paris on one of 
the big boulevards, and of course, we were 
both very much surprised. There is also 
another fellow here with us, in the same cspac- 
ity as I am, whom you no doubt know, and he 
is Thompson, who was in vice-president Thomp- 
son's office of the Baltimore and Ohio. He is 
now connected with the general manager's 
office of the Transportation Department. 

We were all watching with considerable 
interest the great activities in the northern 
part of France, as I suppose you all are, and 
everyone here is quite confident that it will 
mean much for the Allies. The great wastage 
of men and material is bound to materially 
hasten the end of the war, and that now seems 
to be merely a matter for the Hun himself 
to decide. 

Please remember me kindly to Mrs. Mil- 
holland, Mr. Hawkins, Jim, Harry, Fred, and 
all others in the office. I will endeavor to 
drop each one a line now and then, as time 
permits. 

I have just learned from Walter Price that 
our friend Sam is now in the army. Of course, 
not knowing what branch of the service he 
is in, it is quite impossible to look up his or- 
ganization; but I am in hopes of running into 
him, also our friend Captain W^oods. 

With best wishes and hoping Mrs. Milholland, 
your little girl and yourself are in the best of 
health, I am, 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) Harry J. Hunt. 

Mr. F. X. Milholland, 306 Baltimore and Ohio 
Building, Baltimore. 

Mr. Hunt is one of four connected 
with the President's office who were fur- 
loughed for military service. The others 
are S. S. DuBois, now in France, Charles 
McEvoy and H. A. Hallihan. 



25 



26 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Here's the One the Censor Mutilated 

On Active Service with the American 
Expeditionary Force. 

In a Dugout "Somewhere in France." 

April 6, 1918. 

Dear Editor: 

Am very glad to say that I received the Feb- 
ruary issue of our old reliable Baltimore and 
Ohio Employes Magazine, containing one of 
my previous letters to j^ou. Certainly was 
surprised to see it. My friends at Camden 
Station seem pleased with it. 

We are having it right quiet where we are, 
but, nevertheless, we have our troubles as 
it has been raining for the past week and most 
of our time must be spent in our little dugout, 
which must have been built for a smaller 
race of people and not for a bunch of six footers, 
which our gun section consists of. 

As we have lots of spare time, we spend it 
in reading and writing, and have decided to 
use some in trying, the best I can, to tell 3^ou 
of our first trip to the trenches, we being, by 
the way, the first from Maryland to fight. 

Shortly after writing the letter you published 
we loaded our equipment, mortars, wagons, 
horses, etc., on the train, which consfisted of 
fifty cars, box and gondola, we riding in the 
box cars (stencilled on the side, as every 
Sammie in France 
now knows — Hom- 
mes 40, Chevaux 8) 
or in plain English, 
forty men or eight 
horses. 

The side door 
Pullman affords 
every one a good 
chance to view the 
country, which, by 
the way, closely re- 
sembles the Cum- 
berland Valley. 
After a twenty-four 
hour ride, we de- 
trained some few 
miles behind the 
lines. Then the fun 
started. 

Very few of the 
horses had been 
harnessed for sev- 
(!ral months, and 
never with French 
harness, which, by 
the way, is some- 
what different. 

Our headquar- 
1 e r s b e h i ri d t h e 
lines was about 
tw(!nty miles from 
the railroad sta- 
tion. Well, the 
wagons, bomb carts 
and mortars came 
straggling in, the 
last ones naif a day 




behind the first. The movie men, who, it seems, 
bothered us all the time at Camp Mills and on 
the boat — 

(Here's where the censor got busy and 
cut out two pages, leaving only the closing 
paragraph — Editor.) 

Hoping this reaches you safely, I remain. 

Private John H. Gochnauer, 
117th Trench Mortar Battery, American Expe- 
ditionary Forces, via New York. (Formerly 
at Freight Office, Camden Station.) 

George Heslau Cited For Bravery 

In a letter to his parents, George Heslau, 
formerly employed in the Claim Department 
at Chicago, writes: 

Outside of the usual excitement up here 
at the front, there is not much to tell about. 
Of course, this is an exciting place; something 
doing most of the time and, to be truthful with 
you, I have had two "close shaves" within the 
past week. On one occasion it was a case of 
high explosive shell, which killed a French 
soldier nearby. The other was a gas attack. 
I was asleep at the time, but I got my mask on 
in time and about the only thing I suffered 
from was a severe headache for a few hours. 
Those dirty Germans resort to almost an}^- 
thing when they try to ' 'get" us, but we will get 

them in the long 
run. We have now 
gotten to hate them 
not only as a nation 
but as individuals. 
They sure are a 
dirty lot of soldiers. 

I am enclosing 
herewith a copy of 
General Orders No. 
9, from which you 
will note that I 
have received Hon- 
orable Mention by 
our Colonel. I am 
rather proud of my- 
self to think that I 
am one of the first 
ten men of our regi- 
ment to receive 
such in the war. 
I knew that both 
of you will possibly 
shudder when you 
try to imagine what 
I went through on 
the night in ques- 
tion. Itisfarworse 
than what you 
think it is. Truth- 
fully speaking, it 
takes nerve to go 
to the rescue of 
others when the 
I'ritzies are drop- 
j)ing their shells of 
death about you. 
But it takes a real 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



27 



soldier to go through what we went through 
that night and I know that both of you are 
proud of me. It was dangerous— everything in 
this game is dangerous at any time during 
the day — but we came out of all of it O. K. and 
certainly received due credit from our Colonel. 
I do not mean to scare you any, but surely you 
appreciate that this is a dangerous game and I 
am trying to tell you about as much as the 
censors will permit. I told you when I left 
that what I wrote would be the truth or I 
would not tell it, so "there it is!" 

The General Order in which Mr. 
Heslau was cited follows: 

Headquarters 149th Field Artillery American 
Expeditionary Forces, France. 

March 14, 1918. 

General Orders No. 9. 

1. The regimental commander wishes to 
call the attention of the regiment to the gal- 
lant conduct of the following named men, who, 
on the night of March 8, 1918, volunteered to 
go to the aid of C Battery, from which a message 
had been received that several of the men had 
been buried as a result of a heavy shell fire: 

Sergeant W. K. Tatsch . Headquarters Co. 

Bugler A. Oglesby Headquarters Co. 

Private P. J. Mellan. . . .Headquarters Co. 
Private G. W. Heslau. . .First Battalion Head- 
quarters. 

Private E. Swanson . . . .Headquarters Co. 
Private G. Sahagian. . . .Headquarters Co. 
Private J. H. Gross . . . .Headquarters Co. 

Private W. Symons Headquarters Co 

Private W. Greising. . . .Headquarters Co. 
Private T. O'Brien Supply Company. 

2. The spirit of the true soldier is always 
indicated by a determination to perform one's 
duty and a readiness to help one's fellow sol- 
diers. Both of these qualities were displayed 
by these men. 

Henry J. Reilly, 
Colonel Comdg. 149th Field Artillery. 

Official: 

(Signed) Hugh Montgomery, 

Captain 149th F. A., Adjutant. 
F. S. Mygott, 

Lieutenant 149th F. A. 



From a Survivor of the Tuscania 

Following are extracts from a letter written 
by Sergeant Charles A. Trageser, who was 
aboard the ill-fated transport Tuscania, sunk 
by a U-Boat. Mr. Tracreser was formerly em- 
ployed in the Bureau of Rates of Pay. 

We were sailing that Tuesday afternoon on 
a perfectly calm sea within a heavy convoy 
escorted by warships. The boat rode easily 
and dipped and withdrew her bow as if she 
were proud to have the Yanks aboard. We 
were alert all day and had been from the time 
w^e entered the danger one. As darkness fell 
upon us we felt ourselves safe from the demons 
of the sea for that night. I spent my time 
during the trip mostly in the office, and on this 
particular night, while waiting for dinner, I 
joined in a game of cards to pass the time away. 
We had just finished one game and the man 
to my left was dealing cards for a second game 
when we were hit. Life boat drills had been 
practiced during the entire trip and I got to 
my life boat station in about five minutes. I 
got off without getting wet, waiting my turn 
and placing trust in our officers. I was on the 
disabled liner for two hours after she was hit.- 
I landed, not in Larne as you supposed, but in 
Buncranna and was warmly received by the 
soldiers of our Allies. My first thought when 
I landed in that little spot called "Heaven" — 
and adequately called, for the people there 
are angels and saints — was of my mother. 
I had often jested with her about that place, 
but little did I think at those times that it would 
stretch out its arms to me at a time when I was 
most in need of help. So you see I got off 
perfectly safe without getting in the water. 
For further details you must wait until I 
return. 

I am quite well, and recently balanced the 
scales at 151 pounds. When I left, I only 
weighed about 130 pounds. Calesthenics in 
the morning immediately after reveille is a 
wonderful developer. Oh, yes, I can speak 
some French. I can say "Yes," "Do you 
understand," "What," "Very good," "Good 
morning," "Good evening," and some other 
phrases. You should see me when I go to 
town and order a meal. I get there, and be- 
sides enjoy the meal. 



I FREIGHT CLAIM DEPARTMENT j 

' Baltimore, Md., May 8, 1918 • 

/ CIRCULAR No. 17 f 

) TO ALL AGENTS BALTIMORE AND OHIO SYSTEM : j 

* Old Freight House at Cumberland, Md., has been assigned temporarily for storage of * 
f over freight without marks. f 
5 Effective at once, all over freight without marks from all points, exclusive of the Ohio, • 
f Indiana, Illinois and Toledo Divisions, will be forwarded to the 0\er Warehouse at Cumber- f 
*. land, Md. This freight should be tagged with Form 1974-B and waybilled to Agent Over j 
f Warehouse, Cumberland, Md., on Standard Waybill (Form 22). f 

* This amends instructions contained in Circular No. 9 of March 17, 1917, and Circular No. « 
t 16 of May 3, 1918. f 

* C. C. GLESSNER, Auditor Freight Claims. 5 

^ . . . . 4 



Dining Car Department Aiding U. S. Food 
Administration to Prevent Potato Waste 



NE of the staunchest supporters 
of the United States Food Ad- 
ministration in its efforts to solve 
the gigantic food problem is 
the Dining Car Department of the Bal- 
timore and Ohio Railroad. The splendid 
cooperation of that department in help- 
ing the government to prevent 30,000,000 
bushels of potatoes from going to waste 
is set forth in the following press notice 
which was sent out from Washington 
by the United States Food Adminis- 
tration under date of May 10: 

Suggestions for helping to make use 
of this country's big potato crop are 
contained in a menu issued by the Din- 
ing Car Department of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, which besides giving 
the method of preparing potatoes in 
seventeen ways, quotes the prices at 
which these dishes will be served to 
patrons dining on the road. 

'Thirty million bushels of potatoes 
may go to waste. Eat potatoes — save 
something else." the menu urges. This 
special potato menu card is printed in 
the form of a folding post card, so that 
it may be mailed by patrons of the 
dining cars to their friends. 
The menu follows : 

Au Gratin Potatoes — Raw potatoes cut 
in small dice, when cooked, mix with 
cream sauce, put in au gratin dish, 
sprinkle with grated cheese, bake in oven, 
25 ('cnts. 

A Ujerienne Potatoes — Raw potatoes cut 
in laigf; cubes, steam or boil, when cold, 
saut(! in l)utter, sprinkle with choi)[)ed 
parsley, 15 cents. 

CottoAje Fried Potatoes — Cold boiled 
]K)tato('S cut in slicc^s, saute in butter, 
15 cents. 

Hashed Hrovrn Potatoes- (looked ])()- 
tatoes, rninc(Kl and fried in butt(;r, 15 
cents. 



Jidienne Potatoes — Raw potatoes cut 
in fine shreds lengthwise, fried in very 
hot fat, 15 cents. 

Lyonnaise Potatoes — Cooked potatoes 
either minced or thinly sliced, seasoned 
-with salt and pepper, minced fried onion, 
chopped parsley, 15 cents. 

French Fried Potatoes — Raw potatoes 
cut in strips, fried in hot fat till done, 
drain, sprinkle with salt, 20 cents. ~ 

Hashed in Cream Potatoes — Raw po- 
tatoes cut in very small dice, when cooked 
drain, cover with cream sauce, simmer 
few minutes, 15 cents. 

Barahant Potatoes — Cold boiled pota- 
toes cut in squares, saute with minced 
shallat and chopped parsley, 15 cents. 

Potato Crogi^ei^es— Steamed potatoes, 
dry mashed, salt, butter, raw yolks egg 
added, form in cork shape, breaded and 
fried, 15 cents. 

Potatoes Maitre d' Hotel — Raw potatoes 
peeled, cut in section like quartered 
orange, steam till barely done, simmer 
Veloute sauce, chopped parsley, lemon 
juice, 15 cents. 

Duchesse Potatoes — Steam potatoes 
mashed, mixed with yolk of egg, passed 
through pastry bag to a baking sheet, 
brushed with beaten eggs, and baked, 
15 cents. 

O'Brien Potatoes — Hashed brown po- 
tatoes, mixed with chopped pimcntoes, 
saute with butter, 15 cents. 

Potato Pancakes — Raw potatoes, cook 
and mash warm, add egg yolks and niilk, 
whip the white egg firm, and stir in just 
before frying, 15 cents. 

Potatoes Natural — Plain cooked j)()ta- 
to(^s, cut hi any shape, 10 cents. 

Browned Potatoes — Cold boiled i)ota- 
toes, fried whole in -fat, 10 cents. 

I'otatoes LaMaire — Raw potatoes cut 
with a larg(5 cohimn cutter, then sliced, 
l)oil till barely done, simmer till done 
in i-educed cfcani, 15 cents. 




2H 



James Taylor, Jr., of Car Service Department, 

Killed in Action 



INOTHER Baltimore and Ohio 
man has made the supreme sacri- 
jfice. James Taylor, Jr. , for fifteen 
years connected with the Car Ser- 
vice Department, was killed in action 
' 'somewhere in France/' April 21, after 
serving for two years with one of the 
Canadian heavy batteries. 

''Jim'' Taylor, familiarly known as 
"Big Six" by fellow employes, was a 
manly man, one who had high ideals 
of life and lived 



up to the m . 
While he was 
not prominent 
in religious cir- 
cles, he led an 
exemplary life 
in every re- 
spect. 

Hanging i n 
the office where 
he labored is a 
Service Flag, 
bearing fifteen 
blue stars sur- 
rounding one 
of gold — the 
tribute of co- 
workers, who 
revere his mem- 
ory and who 
are not un- 
mindful of the 
fact that "Jim" 
died that they 
might live, free 
from the yoke 
of si a V e r y 
which the 
Kaiser and his 

hordes would fasten on citizens of the 
United States and their allies. Many 
a tear-dimmed eye has gazed at that star. 

Taylor came of a fighting people. 
He was an • Englishman, having been 




JAMES TAYLOR, Jr. 



born in that country July 20, 1881. 
When nine years old he came to America. 
He entered the Car Service Department 
July 2, 1901, and while in Baltimore 
lived at 645 IS^'orth Calhoun Street. 

The boys of the old Fifth Maryland 
Infantry, now stationed at Anniston, 
Ala., share in the sorrow of the em- 
ployes of the Car Service Department, 
for at one time he was a sergeant in 
Company M of that regiment. 

It was on 
January 22, 
1916, that he 
resigned from 
Baltimore and 
Ohio service 
and announced 
that he was 
going to enlist 
under the 
colors of his 
native land. 
Owing to the 
fact that he 
was an Ameri- 
can citizen he 
encounter e d 
some little 
trouble at first, 
but his deter- 
mination won 
out and soon 
his friends in 
Baltimore re- 
ceived word 
that he was at 
the front. 

One of the 
letters received 
was addressed 
to Roy E. Brown, of the same department, 
who was one of his closest friends. He 
referred to the devastation of French 
villages b}^ the Hun; of a trip he made 
to Monte Carlo, Paris and Nice while on 

29 



30 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



a furlough, and of President Willard's 
activities. The latter knowledge, he 
said, he learned through English news- 
papers. 

Mr. Brown has in his possession a 
souvenir received from ''Jim" Taylor 
that money could not buy. He received 
it last fall with a note giving its history. 
It is a tobacco jar made out of old Ger- 
man shells picked up on No Man's 
Land, during a British advance. The 
base of the jar bears the following in- 
inscription ''Karlsruhe, Aug. 1915. Pa- 
tronefabrik. St. 186, HL21." The top, 
of copper, was made from a driving band 
and a neat knob was shaped from a bul- 
let. The work was done by a wounded 
Tommy. 

He also wrote a number of other friends 
in the office and last winter they sent 
him a Christmas box. Recently a club 
was formed to keep him supplied with the 
Overseas Edition of the Baltimore Sun 
and other publications.. 

Mr. Taylor is survived b}^ his mother, 
who is living in Toronto, Canada; two 
brothers, one a lieutenant in the British 
Army on the Italian front and the other, 
A. M, Taylor, of the Valuation De- 
partment, who is located at Vincennes, 
Ind. 



Following is the copy of a letter sent 
his mother by G. F. Malone, superinten- 
dent of car service: 

May 8, 1918. 

Mrs. D. Taylor, 

35 Grosvenor Street, Toronto, Canada. 
Mij Dear Mrs. Taylor: 

The news of the loss of your son and our 
fellow clerk, James Taylor, Jr., has reached us 
and caused a profound feeling of regret among 
the host of friends he had in this office. 

After leaving our service quite a number of 
our employes kept in touch with him through 
correspondence and his progress at the front 
was a matter of interest to all who read his 
letters; to these, who looked upon him as their 
personal friend, his loss is most keenly felt. 

Have had published in the Baltimore Sun an 
article appropriate to the occasion for the in- 
formation of his friends who might not be other- 
wise promptly advised. Have also notified our 
Relief Department, in which he had retained 
his membership. 

Voluntarily leaving congenial surroundings 
and a host of friends to take upon himself the 
hardships of war in defense of his country was 
a very commendable act on his part and we, 
who are left behind, should appreciate the 
great sacrifice so many of our young men are 
now making for us. 

As head of the office in which he spent fifteen 
years' service, I wish to express my apprecia- 
tion of his efficient and faithful work and to 
extend to you, not only my personal sympathy, 
but that of our entire force. 

Yours truly, 

G. F. Malone, 
Superintendent Car Service. 



Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club Gives Benefit for 
Employes in Military Service 



HE fourth annual concert and 
dance of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Glee Club wa-s given April 13 at 
Lehmann Hall, North Howard 
Sti(;et, I^altirnon;, for tho benefit of em- 
ployes of the (Company who have entered 
military servict;. The concert was a 
success in (jvery sense o" the word and 
the cxc(!llent progi-am pn^sented under 
the (h'rection of Hobart Smock won 
well-f^arned apf)]aus(; from officials and 
employes who w(;r(; i)r('S(!nt. 

An especially pleasing feature of the 
concfirt was the work of the soloists — 
Mrs. Hobart Smock, contralto; Hobart 
Smo(rk, tenor, and John JJukc^, pianist. 



Members of club who participated 
were: First Tenors, John R. Blank, M. L. 
Dell, W. E. Ellison, A. S. Hardwick, E. M. 
Hoos, C. M. Perry, K. C. Row Lee, F. 
Tolle, R. M. Van Sant, H. Welkcr; 
Second Tenors, B. H. Andersen, R. Cly- 
mer, R. H. Dienhai-t, George Eichner, 
(i. W. Elste, H. O. Fankhanel, C. X. Hale, 
J. H. Hart, J. H. Lang, B. A. Lippert, 
(). I{. Lutz, C. P. W. Myerly, H. A. Sand- 
lass, J. M. Schneider; First Bass, T. U. 
r'orrest, H. Freeman, J. H. Krager, H. L. 
Leurs, .0. E. Mitchell, J. E. Waugh; 
Second Bass, P. L. Andrews, C. J. Ball, 
G. W. Bangs, H. R. Dorsey, E. Hain, 
W. D. G. Hedeman, J. O'Toole, C. K. 
Towriseud. 




THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



31 



The hall was beautifully decorated 
with the national and state colors and 
a number of Baltimore and Ohio men 
now in military service were present. 
The audience not only had the pleasure of 
hearing the club sing but each person 
was presented with a program containing 
the words of each selection. The pro- 
gram was designed and printed by the 
Relief Department Press, George R. 
Leilich, manager. 

A number of employes from various 
departments in the general offices as- 
sisted the club in providing for the com- 
fort of patrons. The ushers were Misses 
M. T. Gessner, Emma McClayton, Ada 



Gollery, Bertha Greaser, Aline McKnew. 
Miss Edna V. Weller was in charge of 
the box office and the ticket collectors 
were Misses Virginia Smith and Edna L. 
Weller. D. L. Lattin and William Nie- 
meyer, Baltimore _and Ohio messengers, 
were the program boys. 

The Glee Club took advantage of 
the occasion to express publicly its grati- 
tude to the officials of the Central 
Young Men's Christian Association for 
their kindness and courtesy in pro- 
viding a room with heat, light, piano 
and ideal surroundings for rehearsals. 
The piano used was loaned by Charles 
M. Stieff. 



W. W. Wood Stirs Cincinnati Audience 



OHE chief reason why we recall the 
name of a Scottish soldier of for- 
tune of the Seventeenth Century 
is that he penned the words: 
'^If a man were permitted to make all 
the ballads, he need not care who should 
make the laws of a nation." 

We do not know which ballads most 
influenced the life of Andrew Fletcher of 
Saltoun, but we believe that the songs 
which recalled to him the sound of the 
pibroch — the skirl of the bagpipes — 
were the ones which nerved him to 
action. 

History tells us that in every great 
war the marching armies kept step to the 
rhythm of national airs. 

A recruiting officer backed by a drum 
and fife would gain more recruits than 
one who merely displayed the muster roll 
and tried to secure volunteers by telling 
his hearers that it was their legal duty 
to enlist. 

Possibly the four hundred persons who 
gathered at the Hotel Sinton, in Cincin- 
nati, on the night of April 23, to hear 
William W. Wood, special representa- 
tive, speak on the subject of ''A Pull 
Together for Victory," needed no arti- 
ficial stimulus to recruit their energies 
for the use of our government, or to make 
them loyally keep step behind our na- 
tional leader. 

Here was an audience which was 
electrically responsive to the voice of the 



orator when he said ^'We will lick them 
if it takes a thousand years. " 

Young America, as represented by the 
sixth, seventh and eight grade pupils 
of the Riverside school, in the south- 
western end of Cincinnati, materially 
aided, by their rendition of patriotic 
songs and military music, in getting the 
speaker and audience together. 

The pupils sang ''America," ''Keep the 
Home Fires Burning," "Over There," 
"Joan of Arc," "The Star - Spangled 
Banner," and the new Liberty Anthem. 

An orchestra of twelve pieces — four 
violins, five cornets, clarinet, cello and 
drum— accompanied the singers. 

During an intermission, two Boy 
Scouts — Robert Kennedy, bugler, and 
AVesley Ruddick, drummer — gave a num- 
ber of military calls. The audience joined 
in the singing of "Over There," "America," 
"Here's My Boy," "We're Going Over," 
"Where Do We Go From Here?" "On- 
ward to Victory," "Liberty Bell," "Dixie" 
and "The Star-Spangled Banner." The 
orchestra was led by the resourceful Miss 
Dorothea Robertson of the Riverside 
school. Miss Robertson is a daughter of 
William A. Robertson, the Relief Depart- 
ment building inspector for the South- 
west District. 

The audience was composed mainly of 
Baltimore and Ohio employes and their 
families, but the Big Four and other rail- 
roads were represented. — H. Irving Martin. 





Champion Duck 
Pin Bowlers of 
the Baltimore and 
Ohio System 



Upper — Machine Shop No. 2, 
Mt. Clare, winners of cham- 
pionship cup given by vice- 
president J. M. Davis. 

Left to right: Carroll, Gol- 
lery, Beck. Bloomfield, Beau- 
mont and Ryan. 



Lower — John T. Broderick, 
supervisor of special bureaus, 
presenting cup given by Frank 
H. Clark, general superinten- 
dent motive power, to D. W. 
Baker, Accountant's Team, 
Mt. Clare, who had the high 
individual average wood duck 
pin score for the season — 
102.19 



32 



Bowling Prizes Awarded 



|HE 1917-1918 season of the Bal- 
timore and Ohio System Bowling 
League was brought to a suc- 
cessful close on May 11, when 
the final contest was rolled off. The 
Welfare League and the hundreds of 
players who competed for honors deserve 
warm praise for the manner in which 
the contests were conducted. Briefly, 
the season was the best since the bowling 
league was organized. 

The trophy winners follow: 
Davis Cup, to the System duck pin 
champions, won by Machine Shop No. 2, 
Mt. Clare. 

Clark Cup, to high individual average 
wood duck pin score, won by D. W. 
Baker, Accountant's Team, Mt. Clare. 
Average score 102.19. 

Welfare Medal, high individual aver- 
age rubber band duck pin score, won by 
L. M. Pliler, Boilermakers' Team, New 
Castle League. Average score 128. 

Welfare Medal, to high average team 
ten pin score, won by New Castle Yard 
Ten Pin Team, average score 745. 

The final contest to decide the duck 
pin champions of the System was rolled 
on the Plaza Alleys, Baltimore, May 11, 
and drew a big gallery. The cup pre- 
sented by vice-president J. M. Davis 
was the stake. 

The competing teams were Machine 
Shop No. 2, Mt. Clare, and the New 
Castle Junction Yard Team. Three 
games with wood pins were rolled and 
three games with rubber band pins. 
The Mt. Clare men captured two out of 
three in each. 

The scores follow: 

Wood Duck Pins 

Machine Shop No. 2, Mt. Clare 

Bloomfield 90 98 88 

Gollery 84 100 84 

Ryan 90 119 103 

Beaumont 85 99 85 

H. F. Beck 96 117 107 

Totals *445 533 467 



New Castij] Junction Yard 

Meade 90 91 88 

Sweigert 81 86 91 

Wolfgang 81 81 79 

Muder 82 82 87 

Wyman Ill 82 82 

Totals *445 422 427 

*In order to settle the tie score in the 
first game the last frame was rolled off 
and New Castle Junction Yard scored 52 
against 44 by their opponents. 

Rubber Band Duck Pins 

Machine Shop No. 2, Mt. Clare 

Bloomfield 81 91 89 

Carroll 68 84 77 

Ryan 81 83 79 

Beaumont 80 . . 89 

Beck 88 86 73 

Gollery 79 

Totals l92 423 407 

New Castle Junction Yard 

Meade 78 93 80 

Sweigert 73 76 93 

Wolfgang 70 

Muder 63 97 88 

Wyman 80 94 78 

Quehl 89 66 

Totals ~358 449 405 

Clean sportsmanship prevailed through- 
out the contest. Every man was deter- 
mined to do his best. The last game 
was a heart-breaker, being decided only 
when the last man scored. But two 
pins separated the winners and losers. 

After the contest the Davis Cup was 
presented the winning team by Dr. E. M. 
Parlett, chief of the Welfare Bureau, in a 
short talk, who congratulated each indi- 
vidual and praised their splendid co- 
operation in making the season a suc- 
cessful one. Members of the New Castle 
team joined in the handshaking and 
expressed appreciation of the arrange- 
ments made to bring them to Baltimore 
and of the rousing reception given on 
their arrival. 

As stated above, the cup offered by 



33 



34 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




MEDALS AWARDED BY THE WELFARE BUREAU 



Frank H. Clark, general superintendent 
of motive power, was won by a Mt. 
Clare man, D. W. Baker. The trophy 
was handed him by John T. Broderick, 
supervisor of special bureaus. Since 
receiving it Mr. Baker has been fur- 
loughed for military duty and is now 
stationed at Camp Meade, Md. 

C. W. Van Horn, superintendent of 



the New Castle Division, on behalf of 
the Welfare Bureau, presented the medals 
awarded by that department. As stated, 
Mr. Pliler captured the high individual 
rubber duck pin trophy. The ten pin 
team of the New Castle Division, which 
made the high average team ten pin score, 
was composed of Messrs. Muder, Meade, 
Beahm, Wolfgang and Wyman. 



1 



— ^ 



President Willard Offers Baseball Cup 

THE baseball team capturing the championship of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Sy.stem this season will be awarded a silver loving cup by President 
Willard. Mr. Willard is taking a deep interest in the activities of the 
Welfare Bureau, under whose auspices the games will be played, and no doubt 
will be present at the fmal contest to present the cup to the winners. 

Vice-President Thompson's cup, which becomes the property of the team 
winning the championship three years in succession, is also at stake. 

General Manager Begien will give a cup to the winners of the Eastern 
Lines championship. 

General Manager Galloway will present a cup to the champions of the 
Western Lines. 



— «^ 



R. J. Cole, First Editor of Employes Magazine, to Join 
Y. M. C. A. Workers in Italy 



mHE many friends and acquaint- 
ances of R. J. Cole, whose picture 
^gj^^ appears below, and who was the 
P^^^ first Editor of the Baltimore and 
and Ohio Employes Magazine, will be 
interested to know that, at considerable 
sacrifice to himself and family, has heard 
the call of the Young Men's Christian 
Association for service '^over there. " He 
wir. be one of the few secretaries to be 
sent to Italy to organize the work of the 
association among the Italian soldiers. 
At present he is taking a course in Italian 
to enable him to carry on the work in a 
proficient manner. He expects to sail in 
a short time. 

Mr. Cole makes a real sacrifice, for he 
will be separated from his wife and chil- 
dren and will leave behind his beautiful 
home on Long Island. ''But the call 
for service and the great opportunity 
of helping preserve the morale of the 
troops is so wonderfully strong," he 
says, ''that it more than overshadows 
any sacrifice." 

He wishes to be remembered to all 



of his friends and acquaintances on the 
Baltimore and Ohio System. 

Mr. Cole's wife is the accomplished editor 
of the Woman's Page of the New York Sun . 





Willard the First Town in Ohio to Capture Honor Flag 

in Liberty Loan Drive 



HE first town in Ohio to go "over 
the top" in the Third Liberty 
Loan campaign and, of course, 
to be awarded the honor flag, 
was WiUard. This town subscribed far 
more than its allotted quota, and as its 
population is comprised in the main of 
Baltimore and Ohio employes, every per- 
son in the service of the Company is 
mighty proud of this record. Most of 
the credit for this fine show of patriotism 
is attributable to the efforts of J. A. 
Tschuor, general foreman of shops, who 
acted as chairman of the following com- 
mittee, which represented the Baltimore 



and Ohio Railroad: K. E. Floeter, round- 
house foreman; B. L. Johnston, chief 
clerk to general foreman; Ray Crump, 
machinist; A. F. Shober, painter; C. C. 
Cross, machinist ; C. B. Jacobs, electrician ; 
C. F. Ansel, tank foreman; J. T. Dowell, 
storekeeper; C. W. Carpenter, assistant 
boiler foreman; Theodore Speth, foreman 
car inspectors; C. C. Davis, car depart- 
ment; W. G. Gullung, chief caller; Frank 
Pets, timekeeper, maintenance of way. 

Willard was represented by the fol- 
lowing committee: Leon Hunter, chair- 
man, C. H. Strahm, Taylor Beelman, 
George Hoffman. 




36 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



A monster parade was held to cele- 
brate the affair, and never before was 
there such rejoicing at Willard. Soldiers 
carrying a large American flag led the 
procession, in which more than 3,000 
persons took part. The flags of our 
allies followed Old Glory. " Then came 
in succession the official car, city officials, 
a band from Shelby, Willard's fire com- 
pany, a sign requesting people to throw 
money into the large flag following, a 
Goddess of Liberty, Uncle Sam and a 
Liberty Bell, each in an autotruck. Fol- 
lowing this were office girls representing 
Red Cross nurses carrying an American 
flag; shop girls in uniform carrying a 
Tobacco Fund flag for the boys ''over 
there;" the Spirit of 76; 300 Baltimore 
and Ohio employes marching in double 
file; 65 colored Baltimore and Ohio em- 
ployes; a five-inch cannon mounted on 
its own carriage; a boys' band; the Boy 



Scouts; 800 school children. The follow- 
ing fraternal organizations were repre- 
sented in the parade: Odd Fellows, 
Eagles, Masons, Knights of Columbus, 
Knights of Pythias and Elks. Last in 
line were a court of honor, farmers'^ 
grange and 150 automobiles, which were 
led by a beautifully decorated float, the 
work of W. F. Berk, a merchant of 
Willard. Mounted high in the center of 
this float was a little girl, supporting an 
American flag, representing the Star of 
Innocence. 

The boys in France are now cognizant 
of the fact that Willard is squarely be- 
hind them in their fight against the Huns. 
They could have given no better evi- 
dence of this than by their showing at 
the recent drive for the Third Liberty 
Loan. Indeed, it is a fair indication 
that Willard is full of real full-blooded 
Americans. 




CROSS GIRLS OF THE ACCOUNTING l^l'T'A liTMENT— GENERAL OFFICES 

Tho novel plan of Iiavinir Kirls employed in various oflicurw of tho Acoounting Department don Red Cross uniforms origi- 
nated with J. T. Ii<;ary, (Comptroller. Each was assigned to visit certain ofTioas and ask for contributions to tho Second Red 
Cross War Fund. Their fellow clerks promptly responded — Who wouldn't? 

From left to right: Mian Eva Dawson, office of Auditor of Revenue; Mihh Mildkku Kkantz, office of Auditor of Dis- 
Idirsemrjnts; MiHS Makoahet T. Hchuttk, Relief Department; Miss Sallie Tayi-or, office of Auditor Mercliandise Receipts; 
MtsH Dou>KEH .MuKRAY, officc of Auditor Freight Claims; Miss Er.siE Uahkis, office of Auditor Coal and Coko Receipts; Miss 
JrM.iA Gkob, fiflice of Auditor Mcrcliandise Receipts; Mihh Iii,\Nf iiK M. f<Ko:)Kiti( k, oflicc of Auditor Passenger Receipts. 



CHANGES AND PROMOTIONS I 

! 



rp5riN May 1 Thomas J. Walters was 
V/ J appointed general coal freight 
TOjl agent; with headquarters at Bal- 
timore, succeeding H. A. Cochran, 
who, after twenty-one years' faithful ser- 
vice with the Com- 
pany, resigned to 
engage in other busi- 
ness. He entered 
the service of the 
Baltimore and Ohio 
in 1897, prior to 
which time he served 
other transportation 
companies in various 
capacities for sixteen 
years. 

Mr. Walters was 
born at Glamorgan- 
shire, Wales, and 
received his elemen- 
tary schooling in 
the British public 
schools. He came 
to this country as a 
youth and began 
railroad life as a 
clerk with the P. F. 
W. & C. R. R. in 

1881. He remained with that company 
for nine years, during which time he 
was clerk, operator and agent, respec- 
tively. 



chief clerk in the freight department and 
left that company two years later to go 
to the M. K. & T., where he held the 
position of traveling freight agent. He 
held a similar position with both the 
Wisconsin Central 




THOMAS J. WALTERS 



Railway and the 
C. B. &Q. R.R. In 

1897 he became agent 
with the Continental 
Line and in the same 
year entered the 
service of the Balti- 
more and Ohio as 
commercial agent. 
He remained in that 
position until 1910, 
when he was ap- 
pointed division 
freight agent at 
Pittsburgh. While 
in that city he took 
a keen interest in the 
affairs of the Pitts- 
burgh Traffic Club, 
of which he was sec- 
retary for a number 
of years. In Octo- 
ber, 1916, Mr. Wal- 
ters was appointed manager of the 
Continental Line and the Central States 
Dispatch, with headquarters at Cincin- 
nati, which position he held until his ap- 



In 1890 he went to the Erie R. R. as pointment as general coal freight agent. 



37 



38 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



P. C. Allen, Superintendent, 
Baltimore Division 



C. ALLEN was, on April 28, ap- 
pointed superintendent of the 
Baltimore Division, with head- 
quarters at Baltimore, succeed- 
ing C. B. Gorsuch, who was granted a 
leave of absence. 

Mr. Allen entered the Baltimore and 
Ohio service in March, 1914, in which 
month he was appointed superintendent 
of the Philadelphia Division. In this 
position he remained until August, 
1915, when he was transferred to the 
Baltimore Division. He held this po- 
sition for two years, when he resigned. 
He returned to the Company in February, 
1918, as superintendent of terminals, 
reporting to the general superintendent 
of the Maryland District. 



J. W. Deneen, Superintendent, 
Cumberland Division 

lOHN W. DENEEN, who has 
been appointed superintendent of 
the Cumberland Division, with 
headquarters at Cumberland, 
is one of those railroad men who 
has acquired success by sheer deter- 
mination, hard work and ability. His 
appointment became effective April 28. 

Mr. Deneen entered the service of 
the Baltimore and Ohio in July, 1892, 
as operator at Rawlings on the Cumber- 
land Division. In July, 1902, he was 
tiansfei-red to Cumberland as copy op- 
erator. Eleven months later he was 
appointed train dispatcher at Cumber- 
ImtkI, and in May, 1907, was made chief 
night dispatcher. On January 1, 1910, 
was appointed assistant trainmaster 
and held this position for three months, 
wlu^n he was made night chi(!f dis- 
patcher. In May, 191.3, he became train- 
master and was appointed assistant 
Huperint(!ndcnt of Cumberland Division 
three years later. In Novc^mber, 1917, 
he was made superintendcmt of Monongah 
Division, witli headfjuarters at (Jiafton, 
W. Va. 



T. K. Faherty, Assistant Super- 
intendent, Cumberland 
Division 




K. FAHERTY was appointed 
assistant superintendent of the 
Cumberland Division, effective 
April 20, with headquarters at 
Cumberland, Md. Mr. P'aherty was road 
foreman of engines on the New Castle 
Division prior to his appointment as 
superintendent. 



Hugh Wilson, Superintendent, 
Monongah Division 



|UGH WILSON, appointed super- 
intendent of the Monongah Divi- 
sion on April 28, succeeding J. 
W. Deneen, began service with 
the Baltimore and Ohio in September, 
1914, as a special engineer. In Novem- 
ber of the same year he was transferred 
to Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway, 
where he served in a similar capacity. 
He remained in that position a little more 
than a year when he was transferred 
back to Baltimore. On January 1, 1916, 
he was appointed assistant superinten- 
dent of the Monongah Division and re- 
mained in that position until his appoint- 
ment as superintendent. 



B. Z. Holverstott, Assistant Super- 
intendent, Monongah Division 



lERNARD Z. HOLVERSTOTT 
was appointed assistant superin- 
tendent of the Monongah Divi- 
sion on April 28, succeeding Hugh 
Wilson, promoted. He is a man who has 
''come up the Ihie," having begun his 
railroad career as a switch lamp lighten' 
in 1894 in the service of the Erie Railroad. 

Mr. Holverstott held various positions 
as yard and station clerk during vacation 
periods until July ], 1899, and from that 
date until August 1, 1900, he was joint 
bill clei'k and transfer foreman for the 
Erie and C. L. & W. Railroad. He then 
entered the service of the Baltimore and 
Ohio as yai'd and car service cl(;rk on 
what is now a part of tlu^ Pittsburgh 
Division at JOtna, Pa. The same year 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



39 



he was transferred to Butler as night 
yardmaster and ticket agent. 

On June 21, 1901, he went to Fairmont, 
W. Va., as cashier and chief clerk to the 
freight agent. A year later he was pro- 
moted to division accountant in the 
superintendent's office at Grafton, Where 
he became chief clerk to the superin- 
tendent on July 1, 1903. 



In 1912 he was made trainmaster on 
the east end of the Cumberland Division 
and in the same year was transferred to 
Fairmont, W. Va., as assistant train- 
master on the Monongah Division. He 
was appointed trainmaster on the M. 
R. and Short Line Districts, Monongah 
Division, May 16, 1917, which position 
he held until his recent promotion. 



LEFT TO RIGHT— C. E. McGANN, W. R. EARLE AND F. P. PFAHLER 



Farewell Reception Given F. P. Pfahler 



5' >^ IN April 29 a farewell reception 
\J J was tendered in honor of F. P. 
Pfahler, departing master me- 
chanic of the Cumberland Divi- 
sion, who leaves the Company's service 
to go to the United States Railroad 
Administration as Mechanical Engineer. 

The reception was given in the audi- 
torium of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road Y. M. C. A at South Cumberland, 
with W. C. Montignani, secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A., presiding. There were 
about 500 officials and employes present, 
from all points on the division. 

The Keyser shop forces turned out 
strong, headed by their general fore- 
man, J. W. Andrews, and the famous 
Keyser Band furnished music for the 
occasion. 

The Cumberland Shop Glee Club, 
headed by C. L. Colley, furnished the 
singing with a very well selected pro- 
gram. Selections were sung by the 



Thuss Brothers, the famous Snoot Band, 
with their comedian, Earl Denning, and 
his circus recitation, and the Ukelele 
Quartette. 

Talks were given bv C. E. McGann, W. 
R. Earle, M. E. Mullen, Mr. Pfahler's 
assistant, and J. W. Andrews, general 
foreman at Keyser, W. Va. 

In a well-spoken address, V. J. Lucas 
presented Mr. Pfahler with a diamond 
ring on behalf of the shop boys at Cum- 
berland. On behalf of the boys of the 
Glee Club, he was presented with a 
meerschaum pipe set by W. C. Montig- 
nani. Mr. Andrews, in his droll way, 
presented Mr. Pfahler with a traveling 
bag on behalf of the shop boys at Key- 
ser. Mrs. Pfahler was given a handsome 
bouquet of roses. 

Mr. Pfahler thanked the employes of 
the shops for their happy thoughts in 
remembering him with their tokens of 
appreciation. 



Connellsville Division Veterans Hold Patriotic 
Rally to Boost Liberty Bond Sale 



ATRIOTISM and the Third Lib- 
erty Loan were the dominant 
topics at a social meeting of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Veterans' 
Association held recently at Maccabees' 
Hall, Connellsville, Pa. Several hun- 
dred persons, including officials of the 
road, veterans and their families, were 
present. James Wardley presided. Solos 
and music furnished by the Baltimore and 
Ohio band — ''my band," superintendent 
M. H. Broughton styled it^ — enlivened 
the occasion. It is proposed to purchase 
uniforms for the musicians in a short time. 

Addresses were made by Mayor John 
Duggan, superintendent Broughton, 
George Sturmer and J. S. Darr. Mayor 
Duggan at the outset said that he was 
in the Company's service from 1873 to 
1879 and had he continued to be an em- 
ploye he would be proud to be numbered 
among the veterans. He pointed out 
that the Baltimore and Ohio had put 
Connellsville on the map and that the 
citizens of that town owe the railroad 
a deep debt of gratitude. Dwelhng on 
the war, he said that ''the Kaiser has 
out-Neroed Nero and hoped that the 
Hun language would only be spoken in 
the regions the other side of the Styx." 
He was very forcible in his arguments 
anent the Third Liberty Loan and urged 
all those who could possibly afford it to 
secure at least a $50 bond. 

Superintendent Broughton opened his 
address with words of praise for the band. 
He said when he looks back to the time 
wh(!n he had charge of the oil house in 
1881, he f)elieved that he, too, can b(^ 
nunii>(;r(;(l among the v(;terans. "I've 
})usy in iho Jvif)erty Bond drive for 
flu; f)ast two weeks," he said. "In fact, 
when T am asl{!ep 1 am told that I am 
heard to say, 'J)on't take a 150 bond, 
take one for .*?200, ' and I believe it's true. 



I have in mind a track foreman east of 
here. I approached him about buying 
a Liberty bond. He said he did not want 
too as he had contemplated making a 
different kind of purchase. He was 
finally convinced that the Liberty bond 
was the better investment, and the track 
foreman purchased $350 worth of the 
bonds. That's the best thing he could 
have done." 

George Sturmer, that untiring worker' 
in the interests of the Veterans' Asso- 
ciation and who is always on the job 
whenever there is a chance of organizing 
a new branch, said that the association 
has a membership of 8,700, and is still 
growing. A convention of the veterans 
is planned to take place this summer at 
Pittsburgh, he said, and expressed the 
hope that before the date set for the 
opening that every employe who had 
been in the service of the Company 
twenty years will enroll. He promised his 
auditors that those who will go to Pitts- 
burgh will not regret the trip. 

Selections were rendered by a quartet 
composed of E. W. Haviland, Miss Eliza- 
beth Workman and Mr. and Mrs. A. 
R. Boyer. Miss Jessie Rhodes was 
the accompanist "A May Morning," 
sung by Miss Winnie Harrington, pro- 
voked applause and cries of "encore," 
to which Miss Harrington responded. 
Other soloists were Ray McClintock and 
Mrs. R. F. Lyttle.* Interesting papers 
were read by Miss Gertrude Lindsay 
and Miss Brennan. Mrs. W. W. Haines 
and Mrs. A. M. Smith helped make the 
oc(!asi()n a lively one by their piano 
accomi)aniin(^nts and selections. Ten 
boys wearing colonial hats and toy 
hatchets r(H3ii(Hl verses. One of the 
best numbers of the evening was a hu- 
morous recital into a telephone by 
Harry Schenck. 




40 



Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of April, 1918, and to whom 
pensions have been granted: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Dobbs, Henry F. . . 
Vawter, Charles M. 



Car Repairer . 
Conductor . . . 



M. P. 
C. T. 



Wheeling 
Indiana . . 



26 
31 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1917, over $312,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 
those who had been honorably retired. 

The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,347,933.75. 



After having served the Company faithfully for a number of years, the following employes 
have died: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPART- 
MENT 



DIVISION 



DATE OF 
DEATH 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Carr, John 

Cassidy, Michael T.. . 

Kenny, Patrick 

Malloy, John 

McCartney, George W. 

Miers, Charles E 

Perkinson, John W.. . . 
Timms, John P 



Engineman 

Foreman 

Conductor 

Section Foreman 

Engineer 

Yard Clerk 

Helper 

Laborer 



C. T. 
M. of W. 
C. T. . 
M.of W. 
C. T. 
C. T. 
M. P. . 
M. P.. 



Wheeling March 29, 1918 42 

Pittsburgh . . April 6, 1918 10 

Cumberland . April 23, 1918 42 

Monongah April 11, 1918 50 

Connellsville . . April 8,1918 36 

Baltimore April 14, 1918 19 

Baltimore April 26, 1918 34 

Monongah April 23, 1918 51 



41 



42 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




□ □ 

T □ 
i i 



Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine 



Frank A. O'Connell, Editor 
Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist 
George B. Lucre y, Staff Photographer 



□ □ 

□ □ 
I 1 

I I 
1 I 

! I 

i 1 



Italy, France, and Great Britain have 
a combined population of 118,000,000. 
They are much smaller in area than the 
Mittel-Europa empire would be, are de- 
tached from each other, and confined 
within narrow limits on the south and 
west of Europe. Necessarily they would 
become second-class powers. 

The United States, practically alone, 
would be left to face the aggression of a 
power with about twice its population, 
directed by autocratic rulers toward 
further conquest. 

The only way to make ourselves safe is 
to win the war. 



Waste 

IXTRAVAGANCE costs blood, 
the blood of heroes," says Lloyd 
George. 

War savers are life savers. The 
sinews of war are gathered largely from 
thrift. The war cannot be won by 
stored-up resources, for a nation lives 
from hand to mouth. We must save out 
of the present products of labor. The 
British people had to learn, as we must 
learn it, that goods and services must be 
saved by all. Saving must become a 
habit. For war is a battle of resources. 
Germany saves with efficiency because 
she saves scientifically. She conserves 
hei- resources. 

To waste in these times is to fight on 
the side of the Kaiser. 



^'Mittel-Europa'* 

ITTEL-EUROPA is in existence 
to-day," says Frederick Nau- 
mann, a prominent member of 
the Reichstag. 
H(; is r ight, (iermany stands possessed 
of all she hoped to gain when she forced 
this wai'. She has r(;duced her allies to 
military and economic; dei)endenc(;. She 
dominates ]>elgium, Northern France, 
Poland, Russia, S(!rbia, Mont(^negro, and 
J^oumania. Mor(! than 200,000,000 pvo- 
ple are under iho dictation of Prussia. 

If the war ends with conditions as they 
are at present, Germany's brutal policy 
of force; will dominate the world. 



The American Army 

mHE people of the United States 
are an army of 110,000,000 vol- 
^g^l unteers. The troops in France 
are merely its representatives. 
As soon as we learn this and practice it 
we shall be on the way to victory. This 
is no '^Let George do it" war. 

Every man and woman in the country 
ought to find an answer to the question, 
''What can I do to help win the war?" 

President Wilson says: ''The object of 
this war is to deliver the free peoples of 
the world from the menace and the actual 
power of a vast military establishment 
controlled by an irresponsible govern- 
ment. " 

Then if we don't save — if we don't give 
ourselves and our money — we are slackers 
in the ranks. Thank God, most of us are 
eager to help, but we do not always know 
how. 

The efficiency experts are on the job to 
show us. It is our part not to argue, not 
to make excuses, but to ginger up when 
we are shown the way. 

The Price of Victory and The Cost 
of Defeat 



NO matter what it costs in money, 
w(^ shall find it cheaper to win 
than lose the war. 

The Germans are the most 
ruthl(;ss tax collectors on earth. They 
expect America to pay for the war. Their 
newspapcn-s talk of an indemnity of 
.125,000,000,000. When they have the 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



43 



power the Prussian autocrats have no 
difficulty in collecting. 

Bmssels, after many fines and taxes, 
was punished by a fine of 5,000,000 francs 
''on account of the attack made upon a 
German soldier by Ryckere, one of its 
police officials." 

Luneville was fined 650,000 francs 
because of an alleged attack by some 
inhabitants. 

Cardinal Mercier complains that 500,- 
000,000 francs were imposed on impover- 
ished Belgium by December of the first 
year. In November, 1915, the Prussians 
decreed that the contribution be in- 
creased to 40,000,000 francs a month 
from bled-white Belgium. Later it was 
raised to 50,000,000 francs monthly. 

These instances may be increased 
indefinitely. At last the Belgian men 
were carried away into slavery. Later 
this was done in Poland. 

It will be far cheaper to pay now than 
to pay when Germany sets the price. 

**They Say! . . 

is impossible to exaggerate the 
danger which lurks in these words, 
i^^^i They usually introduce a state- 
^ ' ment which is as romantic as it 
is unlikely. If any statesman fears an 
eclipse of free speech, let him go today to 
a card party or a dinner and listen to 
the rambling conversation of the guests. 



For instance there is Mrs. X., who has 
heard stories of the privations suffered by 
our soldiers. 

''They say that the poor fellows are 
freezing to death for want of sweaters. 
The Red Cross has tons and tons of them 
stored up in its offices in Washington, but 
it won't send them out." 

"How perfectly awful," Mrs. Y. ex- 
claims. 

"Well, they say there's a reason for 
that," buzzes Mrs. Z., "the railroads are 
in such an awfiil state of congestion that 
not a single sweater nor an ounce of 
clothing can be sent through." 

"You don't say so." 

"Well, I only know what I'm told. 
But I'm not surprised. The government 
took an awfully big job on its shoulders 
when it took over the management of the 
railroads." 

That last statement is absolutely true. 
It is the only one of the lot that is true. 
Because we have entered this greatest of 
all wars, our government is burdened 
with the biggest job it has ever had on its 
shoulders. If Mrs. Z. only knew how 
little she helps the national cause by 
repeating these rumors of the German 
propagandists, she would think twice 
before giving voice to them. It is strange 
behavior to buy Liberty bonds in the 
morning, and spend the afternoon and 
evening in spreading the malicious gossip 
invented by the enemy. 




TEN dollars is being awarded each quarter of the year to 
, the employe submitting the best original article on 

j Accident Prevention. The present contest period ends June 
I 30. Send your contributions to John T. Broderick, Supervisor 
j Special Bureaus, Baltimore and Ohio Building, Baltimore. 




An Apron Built on New Lines with Kimona Sleeves 
and Round Neck is Neat and Attractive 



mEPARTING considerably from 
the bungalow and other house 
aprons, this model with round 
neck and short kimono sleeves 
is of especial interest to women who do 
their own housework. It is trimmed 




AriK)\ FJdH'l' IIOdSFAVOIMv 



44 



with a patch pocket which is attached to 
the right side of the apron. Plain ging- 
ham, percale or unbleached muslin may 
be used to make the apron, average 
size requiring 1% yards 36-inch material. 

Section ''B" takes in the entire apron, 
excepting the pocket. The triple 
^^TTT" perforations are laid along the 
lengthwise fold of material so that there 
will be no seam. In the space remaining 
to the left the pocket may be placed, the 

CONSTRUCTION GUIDE 76*7 ;> 




large ''0" perforations on a lengthwise 
thread. For tie strings, cut two strips 
of the material a yard long and 2^4 inches 
wide, when finished. 

With the cutting done, the construc- 
tion is easy. Close the underarm and 
sleeve seam as notched and underface 
the right hack edge of the aj)ron about 
one inch deep. S(nv a, nari'ow nndcrlnp 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



45 



to the left CUTTING GUIDE 76T5 

back edge. 
Finish with 
buttons and 
buttonholes 
for closing. 

If desired, 
the pocket 
may be under- 
faced or it can 
be hemmed. 
Adjust on the 
right side of 
the apron, 

with upper edge at indicating small ^^o" 
perforations and stitch side and lower 
edges to position. 

After hemming the tie string, plait 
one end and attach to apron at the single 
large ''0" perforation in back. 



Showing. Medium 

SELVAGE. 



EDGn-O 




FOLD OF 
Patented April 30, 1907' 



56 mCh MRTERIRL 



One-Piece Apron No. 7675. Sizes, small, 
medium and large. Price, 15 cents. 



Skirt No. 7339. 
Price, 20 cents. 



Sizes, 24 to 32 inches waist. 



Pictorial 
agents. 



Review pattern on sale at local 



Fascinating New Frocks That May Be Worn 
With Grace and Ease 

By Maude Hall 



ROM ^'somewhere in France" 
have come delightful frocks that 
bespeak the coming summer. 
They are fascinating and may be 
worn with utmost ease and grace, for in 
them the designers seem to have caught 
and imprisoned the spirit of youth. 
While there is no standardization of 
modes, nor is there likely to be any, the 
straight and narrow line is generally 
accepted by all of the leading couturiers. 
And yet, after all, the narrowness is often 
a matter of impression rather than of 
fact, as some of the modish frocks depart 
quite radically from absolute straight- 
ness of line. Many of the tunic and 
overskirt draperies widen the skirt line 
very emphatically at one point or another, 
and many a waist is swathed simply 
enough to hint at curves while avoiding 
compression. 

Rather a new way of giving width to 
the hips is exploited in a frock of ging- 
ham taffeta. The checks are marked 
off in quadruple lines, grouped narrowly, 
but placed far apart. Three shades of 
blue figure in the color scheme. The 
two-piece skirt is gathered and attached 



to a simple waist under a girdle of blue 
satin. The front gore is made in two 
sections with pockets trimmed with large 
buttons of white organdy. The collar 
and plait down the front of the waist are 
also of organdy, for Paris revels in odd 
combinations this season. 

Many of the most successful novelties 
in costumes owe their originality to un- 
usual association of materials. Another 
instance in which the French dressmakers 
take a radical departure is a dark blue 
serge costume trimmed with pique in 
block pattern. The skirt has two deep 
flounces stitched upon a narrow founda- 
tion, the uppermost being hemstitched 
and trimmed with large pockets. A deep 
hem and narrow binding of the pique 
give particular prominence to the pockets, 
while both flounces are hemmed with 
pique. Skirt and waist are joined under 
a straight pique belt and a large collar 
of plain white linen is hemmed also with 
pique. 

Another novelty is a little frock of 
cotton marquisette, made very simple 
and trimmed with gold embroidery. 
The trimming is put on in blanket stitch 




46 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



to outline the panel front and back of the 
blouse and there is a belt of gold gauze 
ribbon. The sleeves are not only well 
made, but they are interestingly cut, the 
part that flares beyond the deep cuff 
being in one with the upper portion of 
the sleeve. A bit of gold stitching gives 
just the right touch of individuality. 
When one does not prefer gold threads for 
embroideries and fancy stitchings there 
is that other high favorite at the court of 
fashion — angora wool, which is found 
even on the sheerest of handkerchief 
linens and batistes. 

Undoubtedly it is a silk season, for 
everyone is conserving wool, and silks 
are considered the materials exclusive 
for semi-dress models. But there are 
always times when sheer cotton fabrics, 
organdies, batistes, etc., rise to the occa- 
sion as nothing else can, therefore particu- 
lar attention is paid to frocks designed in 
thin materials. A dainty dress in white 
batiste with a shaded blue dot is com- 
bined with plain blue organdy most 
effectively. Skirt and waist are both 
quite simple and much of the smartness 
of the design is achieved by the addition 
of an organdy fichu about the neck. The 
lines of the fichu are unusually soft and 
caressing, the edges being finished with 
narrow frills with picoted edges. 

Frequently the collar and cuffs are 
the only trimming of a simple frock, but 
my! what distinctive ideas are crowded 
into these little accessories. Every kind 
of material imaginable is employed in 
their development. Fine white cotton 
net, that right bower of ingenuity and 
economy, is appearing in many collar and 
cuff novel ities and it also makes dainty 
undorcuffs to wear with the flowing 
sleeves now so fashionable. 



Numbers of attractive collars are 
bound with satin and silk in white, black 
and colors. Embroidery and braiding 
were never used in such magnificent 
effects as this season and one finds many 
of the most fetching braids employed to 
trim the little Eton jackets which add 
so much in the way of youthfulness and 
grace to costumes of smart fabrics. 

So favorably do the French designers 
regard black and white combinations 
that some of the leading houses are con- 
fining the majority of their njodels to 
these two colors. A straight white taffeta 
has a long narrow collar of black satin, 
with cuffs and belt of the same trimming, 
and it is as charming a model as anyone 
could wish. The addition of a bit of 
fine lace makes it appropriate for evening 
wear. There are numbers of black and 
white foulard designs which have 
attracted no end of smart attention. 
Some are in daringly figured designs and 
are combined with white satin or some 
other white material, such as embroidered 
organdy. 

Of somewhat severe type, yet inex- 
pressibly smart is a dress of oyster white 
pongee. It is uncompromising in its 
slimly built, untrimmed lines, buttoning 
from just below the bust to the hem of 
the skirt with business-like nickel but- 
tons. A black ribbon sash drawn from 
the side seams, to tie closely across the 
front and hang in long ends, softens what 
would otherwise be a hard line. 

With many of the new summer frocks, 
even these made of the sheerest mate- 
rials possible, velvet is used, sleeveless 
jackets of black velvet bound with silk 
braid adding a smart air to a costume 
while providing comfort on a chilly 
afternoon or evening. 



V- — 



It ain't the individuals 
Nor the army as a whole, 

But the everlasting team-work 
Of every bloomin' soul. 

■ — Kipling 




The Needleworker's Corner 



Initials That May Be Used Effectively 
For Marking Personal Belongings 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



HIME was when monogramed linen 
was a luxury, reserved for fash- 
ion's favored and furtune's elect, 
because it was worked either by 
women who could afford to pay for it or 
those who had the leisure to devote to 
needlework. 

Nowadays the woman who is clever 
with her needle can crowd in the time 
between household duties, business cares 
and club meetings to adorn her household 
linen, even though it be not of the ex- 
quisite texture of olden days. Beautiful 
damasks come at reasonable prices and 
these can be ornamented to make elegant 
dining and bedroom linens. Cheaper 
qualities of Irish and Scotch linens used 
for bed linen by women of moderate 
means are just as effective as the costly 
weaves, if the initials and monograms 
employed in their making are skilfully 
done. 

The alphabet shown on this page is 
unexcelled for its beauty and originality 
of design. The success of initial em- 
broidery, whether single or in monogram, 
lies very largely in careful stitchery. A 
style of lettering that is very popular 
with French needleworkers is illustrated 
above. The outlines are all worked solid. 
The sohd parts should be padded very 
evenly and this is best done in a frame. 
Too much attention cannot be paid to 
this humble part of the work, not only 



for the design in question^ but for all 
letters and monograms, for if the padding 
is poorly done, the finished work is 
very uneven. 




No. 1] 



-M, 1, 2, 3 AND 4 INCHES 



Pictorial Review Transfer Pattern No. 
11998, blue, 15 cents for each letter. Five sizes, 
I, 1, 2, 3 and 4 inches of any one letter of the 
alphabet with 12 transfers of each size are 
given in this pattern. 



Show Your Patriotism by Contributing to the 
American Red Cross 



47 




Staten Island Division 

At 1.25 p. m., March 18, engineer George 
Hartman discovered fire under truck of coach 
85, which was standing on rear end of storage 
track, South Beach. He took prompt action 
by pulling car up to water plug, where fire was 
extinguished. Meritorious mention has been 
placed on his record. 

Towerman Gillo jly noticed hot boxes on car 
in train No. 11, April 6, and train No. 29, April 5. 
He had same remedied. Meritorious mention 
has been placed on his record. 

Conductor Hugh Morrow, train No. 187, 
March 25, discovered fire under platform 2, 
North Shore Terminal, St. George. He took 
prompt action and had fire extinguished before 
doing any damage. He has been commended 
for his prompt action and keen observation. 

On March 26 trainman C. H. White dis- 
covered defective rail on track 43, St. George 
Yard; engine 1639 was coming down track at 
the time. He signalled engineer to stop before 
he fouled this rail and guided him over this 
portion safely. He then took measures to have 
defective rail rectified. 

At 3.30 p. m., March 28, on extra 1639 west, 
trainman C. H. White, who was riding in caboose, 
noticed when train rounded curve at Snug Har- 
bor sparks flying from a car. He immediately 
signalled engineer to stop. Inspection of train 
developed car was off centre and it was set off 
at Arlington. 

On March 30 while extra 1632 west was 
running west of Arlington, trainman C. II. 
White noticed sparks flying from one of the cars. 
He had train stopped and inspection made, 
wliich develoi)ed that brake rigging on one of 
the cars was down. He had defect corrected. 

I'or the above three cases Mr. White has been 
tlianked by the managerrKjnt and merit marks 
placed on his s(!rvicc record. 



On train 748, 5.17 p.m., April 14, trainman H. 
Dougherty noticed an unusual jar on a coach 
while train was running between Tompkinsville 
and Stapleton. When train stopped at Staple- 
ton he made an examination and found a defect, 
necessitating setting car off on siding. Meri- 
torious mention has been made on the record of 
Mr. Dougherty. 

Engineer Manion, in charge of train No. 747, 
engine 7, Sunday evening, April 14, after leaving 
Arrochar noticed boudler weighing over 100 
pounds in the centre of westbound track, on 
the curve. He had it removed and train pro- 
ceeded with slight delay. The management 
has thanked engineer Manion for his keen ob- 
servation, and meritorious mention has been 
made on his record. 

At 8.50 a. m., April 6, towerman James 
Flaherty discovered defective equipment on 
first car in train No. 17, passing Clifton Junction 
Tower. He had same remedied. A meri- 
torious mention has been made on his record. 

Philadelphia Division 

On April 16 operator F. C. Breitcnbach 
noticed defective equii)ment on extra west 4125 
and succeeded in 
attracting the at- 
tention of train- 
men on rear end. 
T he train w a s 
brought to a stop 
lialf a mile west 
of Childs. This 
action on tlu; pari, 
of M r. Ji re i ten- 
bach is v(iry coni- 

mcnd.'ible. i'. c. HREITENBACII 



4b 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



49 



While extra west, engine 4084, was passing 
over Susquehanna Bridge, April 7, W. E. Cox, 
conductor, and C. J. Nickol, flagman, noticed 
bridge on fire on west side of the island. They 
stepped on west end of bridge, notified bridge 
watchman and then hurried back and put the 
fire out. Their prompt action is commendable. 

Cumberland Division 

At 3.45 a. m., April 2, west end engineer W. H. 
McFarland discovered a defect in eastbound 
running track at Grafton while enroute with 
engine 7107 to his train. He left brakeman at 
that point to protect and reported matter to 
yardmaster, who arranged to hold other engines 
until trouble was rectified. Superintendent 
Brooke has written engineer McFarland a letter 
in which he thanked him for the interest and 
prompt action taken in this case, and assured 
him of the appreciation of the officers of the 
Cumberland Division and the management. 

As extra 4853 east passed Martinsburg at 7.28 
a. m., March 24, operator J. L. Schroder noted 
defect on sixth car from caboose. Information 
was sent to the crew by helper engine. 

At 5.32 a. m., March 25, as extra 4844 east 
passed Martinsburg, operator J. L. Schroder 
noted defective equipment under R. I. G. car 
131042, thirty cars from caboose. Crew was 
informed and defect given attention at Opequon. 

On March 29 as extra 4848 east passed Green 
Spring, operator J. D. Rockwell noted door 
open on one of the cars, exposing contents. 
Train was stopped at Okonoko and car given 
attention. 

While extra 4839 west was passing McKenzie 
at 10.32 a. m., March 31, operator F. L. Byrd 
noted hopper bottom down under fourth car 
from engine. Train was stopped at Rawlings 
and repairs made. 

At 8.00 p. m., while on his way home from 
work. Western Maryland track foreman W. J, 
Staggs discovered a defective rail in the east- 
ward track a short distance west of McKenzie 
Tower. He made a prompt report of the matter 
to operator Biggs at McKenzie Tower and 
arrangements were made to protect the defect 
until trackmen arrived to renew the rail. Mr. 
Staggs' interest and promptness in reporting 
the defect is appreciated. 




MRS. G. C. HELSLEY 



On April 16 while extra 4212 east was passing 
Sleepy Creek station, Mrs. G. C. Helsley, wife of 
agent at that point, noted defect on the forty- 
sixth car in train. She promptly telephoned 
the information to operator at Sleepy Creek 
Tower, who held trains on adjoining tracks until 
the condition could be remedied. The prompt- 
ness with which Mrs. Helsley covered the 
situation is commendable. 

At 3.59 a. m., April 9, while extra 4234 east 
passed Martinsburg, operator J. L. Schroder 
noted hot box on fifty-second car from engine. 
He informed conductor, who made examination 
at Opequon and found it necessary to set car 
off at Hobbs. 

Monongah Division 

F. England, third trick operator, on April 21 
discovered a defective rail about three hundred 
yards west of Seventeen Cut and reported the 
matter to the operator at Bridgeport, who in 
turn called out sectionman and had repairs 
made. 

Cleveland Division 

On April 3 yard brakeman F. Wells discovered 
a defective rajl on P. C. & T. connection east 
of No. 10 track switch, Akron Junction, and 
promptly reported this condition to night yard- 
master, who had it repaired immediately. He 
has been commended by the superintendent. 

Newark Division 

On April 5 while train No. 70 was passing, 
operator A. B. Leabold, working at Toboso, 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



heard an unusual noise and immediately took 
his lantern and investigated the cause. He 
discovered a defective rail near the station and 
stopped the train. He has been commended 
for his alertness. 

On April 6 R. Connizzaro, repair track gang 
foreman, discovered fire in a pile of lumber near 
the repair tracks and immediately called 
Emmett Parson and John Livingston, fellow- 
workmen. They moved the lumber and ex- 
tinguished the flames before much damage 
was done. They have been commended for 
the interest displayed in protecting the Com- 
pany's property. 

Connellsville Division 

Numerous complimentary mentions of the 
way in which engineer D. Quinn made stop 
when the tender was derailed on No. 15 at 
Pinkerton Tunnel, April 16, have been re- 
ceived by superintendent Broughton, who sent 
the following to Mr. Quinn: ''I feel that you 
should be acquainted with the fact that the 
people noticed the manner in which you handled 
the air." 

While walking along tracks near Cheat Haven 
on the morning of April 4, Miss Fern Nicola, 
Cheat Haven, Pa., discovered a defective rail 
about one half-mile west and another one mile 
west, and took immediate action by flagging 
work train. 




MISS FKKN NICOI.A 



This act is very commendable and superin- 
tendent Broughton has expressed his apprecia- 
tion of Miss Nicola's interest in the welfare of 
the Company of which her father is a foreman. 

New Castle Division 

Conductor Solomon, on extra 4214 west, 
March 30, at B€) Tower, Akron Junction, dis- 
covered defective equipment on caboose C-27. 
Same was set out at Akron Junction and crew 
proceeded to Willard, Ohio. 

Conductor W. A. Cavany, extra 4127 west, 
April 2, dismounted at BD Tower to inspect 
train while pulling in Akron Junction yards. 
He discovered brake beam down, and made 
repairs without delay. 

Lester Godwin, flagman on hill engine at 
BD Tower, while heading into clear, discovered 
points of switch not fitting up properly and he 
reported it to officials at New Castle Junction. 

Illinois Division 

On February 16 while coupling up track at 
Indian Refining Company's plant at Lawrence- 
ville, fire from engine ignited oil in holes in 
center of track where oil is drained from empty 
tank cars. Fireman C. A. Reed discovered the 
fire and quickly extinguished it by throwing 
dirt in the holes, thus preventing damage. 
Mr. Reed has had a commendatory notation 
placed on his record for his quick action and 
interest in the Company's welfare. 

A short time ago flagman E. B. Milligan, on 
caboose C-142, turned in 110 pounds of scrap 
brass and babbit for which the Transportation 
Department received a credit of $22.00. Mr. 
Milligan is to be commended for his action in 
gathering up this scrap and the interest he 
shows in the Company's welfare. Several 
other men have turned in various amounts of 
scrap of different kinds for which the Trans- 
portation Department has received credit. 
These men are all to be commended for the 
interest they show in the Company's welfare. 
In doing such work as this the men are "doing 
their bit" to help win the war. 

On February 22 a short time before extra 
west 2036-2623 started to pull out of the yards 
at Fh)ra, car inspector William Black in going 
over the train discovered defective equipment 
on one of the cars. Car inspector Black is to 
be commended for his watchfulness. 



AMONG OURSELVES 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts* Office 

Correspondent, John Limpert 

With arms outstretched we welcome J. P, 
Williams, head clerk of the Tidewater Bureau, 
to the ranks of the married. Mr. Williams took 
the "leap" April 25, and with his bride honey- 
mooned around New York City. We suppose 
it will only be a matter of time before the 
usual cigar will have vanished and the corncob 
pipe take its place, but, the hearty good wishes 
of the entire office are extended to the happy 
couple. May they live long and happily. 

Opposites attract each other, to wit: — 
"Bobby" Burns and Miss Owings dancing at 
the Glee Club concert. 

Car Service Department 

The Car Service office is proud to record its 
performance in doing its bit towards making 
the Third Liberty Loan a success. 

George H. Pryor, auditor of disbursements, 
was selected by the management to address our 
force on this subject, after which two com- 
mittees were put to work taking subscriptions 
to the loan. Miss Elna R. Sellman was chair- 
man of one committee \^ith Miss Florence 
SchaefTer and J. A. Biddison as assistants, 
while the rival committee was headed by Miss 
Ellen Sims with G. H. Smith and M. P. Sher- 
wood as assistants, and through their efforts 



87.2 per cent, of our office force became 
subscribers to the Third Loan, aggregating 
$12,300. 

Adding to our percentage those who felt 
unable to participate in the Third Loan on 
account of carrying first and second issues would 
bring our percentage of subscribers up to 95 
per cent. If the ratio established by our force 
on the Third Loan was maintained throughout 
the United States the three billion loan would 
have been over-subscribed by one and one-half 
billion dollars. 

We are arranging to display a service flag in 
our office carrying sixteen stars. Thirteen per 
cent, of our male employes have entered the 
service. It will be seen from the above that 
we are doing our best to have a "For Rent" 
sign placed in the front window of the Imperial 
Palace at Berlin. ^ 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, T. A. Kavanagh, Freight 
Agent, West 26th Street, N. R. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



W. B. Biggs Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. L. MicHELSON Terminal Cashier 

C. E. Floom Terminal Claim Agent 

J. J. Bayer Freight Agent, Pier 22, N. R. 

J. T. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

T. Kavanagh Freight Agent, 26th Street, N. R. 

T. F. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

M. F. Steinberger Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

J. E. Davis Freight Agent, St. George Transfer 

E.J. Kehoe Freight Agent, Pier 4, Wallabout 

Marine Department Members 
E. A. English Marine Supervisor, Chairman 



C. H. Kearney.. Assistant Marine Supervisor, Vice-Chairman 

.'jI 



4 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, S. A. Turvey, Trainmaster' s 
Clerk, St. George 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanlin Chairman, Superintendent 

B. F. Kelly Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

S. A. Turvey Secretary, Trainmaster's Clerk 

H. W. Ordeman Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Dr. F. De Revere Medical Examiner 

A.J. Conle y Road Foreman of Engines 

J. D. GiBB Trainmaster 

J. F. McGowAN Division Op.:rator 

E. R. Decker Division Agent 

\V. J. Kenney Attorney 

C. A. Wilson Supervisor Crossing Watchman 

RoTATiXG Members 

W. Xeiderhauser Towerman, Tower B 

J. B. Gerow Freight Conductor 

Guy Fetzer Painter 

W. Smith Locomotive Engineer 

J. N.APLES Locomotive Fireman 

W. A. Marshall Clerk to Agent, Tompkinsville 

G. J. GooLic Inspector 



Trainmen Robert Seigle and Ralph Mansch 
have enlisted in the Stevedore Corps as privates. 

Mr. Robert Kelsey, former dock foreman, has 
been furloughed to enter the service of Uncle 
Sam as first lieutenant in the Stevedore Corps. 
All the boys extend their best wishes to ''Bob" 
(his pet name) for a speedy return together with 
an abundance of glory. 



The following men have been called in the 
draft: "Gus" Trabant, J. S. Gibbs and F, Van 
Nostrand, freight trainmen; A. G. Wood, pas- 
senger trainman and Bert Loftus^refer inspector. 

The Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway 
Company, living up to its reputation, has come 
through in the crisis and showed the railroads 
at large what it can do. Owing to the heavy 
perishable movement from the south, a portion 
of the business formerly handled via the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad is being diverted to the Balti- 
more and Ohio, which means that the S. I. R. T. 
must handle the goods to destination in New 
York. This commodity is being handled at 
Pier 7, N. R., in a most efficient manner. 
Several records have been broken since the 
movement of this commodity over our lines. 
On April 24 a train arrived in St. George with 
perishables for Pier 7. Float 168 was loaded 
with tw^elve cars and ready to move to Pier 7, 
N. R., in ten minutes after train arrived in 
yard — some fast movement. Captain Milo- 
vich, of tug boat "Randolph," who handled this 
float, towed it to Pier 7, a distance of seven and 
one fifth miles, placed it in berth, and was back 
at St. George float bridges in two hours, 
ready to tow another float. This is a record 
that all employes of the New York Terminal 
Lines of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
should be proud of. 

The Long Island Railroad has opened floating 
service wath our line at their new Bay Ridge 





ST. GEORGE. S. L. YARD-APRIL 12. lOlS, WHEN TT WAS VISITED BY THE 
HIGHEST TIDE IN TWENTY-FIVE YEARS 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



53 




"JOE" MASSA 



float bridges. This means the cutting off of 
about four miles extra towing to Long Ishmd 
City, which was necessary heretofore. 

A Vision of Joy 

By Luke Ward, Labor Agerit, 
74 Bowery, New York City 

I've travelled up and down the coast, 
I've roamed o'er all the earth; 
From every game I've got the most — 
I've had my money's worth. 
But one more sight I want to see 
Before I leave this land 
And that is, Kaiser "Bill" 
With a lily in his hand. 

For nigh four years he's plundered 
Fair lands east of the Rhine; 
His mightiest gims have thundered 
And have razed each sacred shrine. 
Now Uncle Sam is in it; 
He'll go to Kaiserland 
And force "Bill" to the limit- 
Place a lily in his hand. 

In this I know you'll all concur, 
You want a lasting peace. 
Then stand by Mr. Wilson, sir. 
Your Liberty Bonds increase. 
The Prussian's power let us kill 
With all that we command. 
So that we may see Kaiser Bill 
With a lily in his hand. 



Second trick tug dispatcher H. Flood has 
resigned to accept a position as captain of the 
"Mary Tracy," a tug boat owned by the Tracy 
Towing Lines. W. B. Enright, third trick 
dispatcher, has been moved up 1o fill the 
vac^ncv created by Mr. Flood's resignation. 
W. Kelly, mate, has been promoted to fill the 
vacancy created by Mr. Enright's promotion. 

The sale of Liberty Bonds of the third issue 
has been met in a remarkable manner by the 
employes of the New York Terminal Lines — the 
present comes up to $70,000, and is still going 
strong. 

Staten Island Railroad Club 

On Thursday, April 11, we held a masquerade 
party at the club house, which was a decided 
success, despite the bad weather. Everyone 
attending was rigged up in some sort of a 
costume; the hall was decorated with Japanese 
lanterns, etc., all of which made a pretty scene. 

Regular ladies' night entertainment was held 
Thursday, April 25, and a pleasant evening 
was enjoyed by all. 

Baseball practice has been resumed for this 
year, and it is hoped that a strong team can be 
put in the field to compete with the other 
divisions. 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondent 
J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent 

C. E. OwEX Vice-Chairman, Trainma.ster 

T. Bloei her Division Engineer 

J. P. HiNEs Master Mechanic 

.I.E. 8extm.\n Road Foreman of Engine.s 

H. K. H.ARTMAN Chief Train Dispatcher 

T. B. Fr.\nklin Terminal Agent 

J. N. GouMAN Captain of Police 

F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

E. G. Owens Road Engineer 

W. E. Burns Road Fireman 

H. F. Lane Road Conductor 

J. F. CooNEY Yard Conductor 

Wm. Tisdale Machine Shop Foreman 

R. F. MiNNiCK Car Builder 

Felice Cori Section Foreman 

W. M. Devlin Secretary 



W. M. Devlin, secretary to superintendent, 
was called for military service and left for 
Camp Lee, April 25. 

E. F Kenna, clerk in superintendent's office, 
has been appointed secretary to superintendent, 
vice Mr. Devlin, 

J. C. Anderson, motive power clerk, East 
Side, resigned April 15 to engage with a private 
firm in Philadelphia. 

W. J. Scott, motive power timekeeper, has 
been appointed motive power clerk, vice Mr. 
Anderson. 

Subscriptions to the Third Liberty Loan on 
the Philadelphia Division, up to April 24, were 
$35,600. 



54 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




W. J. Wilde, clerk in superintendent's office, 
Philadelphia, has taken position as crew dis- 
patcher, Philadelphia Terminal, at East Side. 

W. E. LeBrock, timekeeper in division 
accountant's office, has taken position as clerk 
in superintendent's office. 

The old Baltimore and Ohio spirit, which is 
the true American spirit, is very much alive 
on the Philadelphia Division. 

In the recent Liberty Loan campaign, a 
part of the Maintenance of Way Committee 
took a trip to an outlying point to cover a 
carpenter gang living in camp. A meeting was 
called and a number of men reported that they 
had already subscribed through their banks. 
This did not stop them, however, and they 
subscribed to the Baltimore and Ohio offer, 
with the exception of one man. This man had 
had serious difficulties, sickness and death, 
and felt unable at the time to commit himself 
to further expense. A motion, therefore, was 
made then and there that those present buy 
a bond for him, and first payment was made, 
the motion having been carried unanimously. 

With such a spirit prevading the rank and 
and file, America cannot lose. All honor to 
the true patriots. 

The spirit evinced at this meeting had a fine 
effect on those present, and every man left a 
better man for having taken part. 

The Veteran Employes' Association, at their 
meeting April 17, voted for and have sub- 
scribed for two Third Liberty Bonds of $100 
each. 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B. Moriarity, Superin- 
tendent's Office, Camden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

P. C. Allen Chairman, Superintendent 

\V. E. Xeiuson Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 

T. E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secretary, Brunswick 

('. H. WiNSLOW Secretary, Washington 




COIU'OHALS C. 1'. JiUJAC AM) 
A. A. .JACOBS 



MATERIAL DISTRIBUTERS, STOREKEEPER'S 
DEPARTMENT, EAST SIDE 



Relief Department 

Dr. E. H. Mathers Medical Examiner, Baltimore 

Dr. J. A. RoBB Medical Examiner, Washington 

Dr. J. F. W'ard Medical Examiner, Winchester 

R. B. Banks Divisional Claim Agent, Baltimore 

J. M. Powell Captain of Police, Camden Station 

Transportation Department 
S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick. Md. 

C. A. Mewshaw Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. E. HuRLOCK Division Operator, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J. J. McCabe. . Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 
W. T. Moore Freight Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Freight Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Freight Agent, Brunswick 

W. E. Neilson Freight Agent, Camden Station 

J. L. Hawes Freight Conductor, Riverside 

W. T. Edgar Yard Conductor, Camden Yard 

C. W. McDaniels Passenger Fireman, Riverside 

J. W. Cavey .Passenger Engineman, Riverside 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan General Foreman, Locust Point 

C. W. Selby Supervisor, Gaithersburg 

S. J. Lichliter Supervisor, Staunton, Va. 

W. O. RuNKLES Section Foreman, Brunswick 

C. RiTTER Signal Repairman, Mt. Royal Station 

R. W. Mitchell Carpenter Foreman, Baltimore 

Motive Power Department 

T. F. Perkinson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G.B.Williamson , General Car Foreman, Riverside 

T. O'Leary Car Foreman, Washington 

C. W. C. Smith Machinist, Brunswick 

C. B. Bosien Machinist Apprentice, Riverside 

J. W. Peyton Leading Car Inspector, Brunswick 

G. N. Hammond Material Distributor, Locust Point 



Reproduced on this page are pictures of two 
former Baltimore and Ohio employes who 
showed their patriotism when the call came 
by joining the colors. They are (right) Corpo- 
ral A. A. Jacobs, 313th Infantry, Camp Meade, 
and (left) Corporal C. P. Bujac, Headquarter's 
Company of the same regiment. Corporal 
Jacolis was formerly a signal foreman at Cum- 
berland, Md., while for a number of years 
(vorporal Bujac was employed as electrician. 
Some time ago Corporal Bujac obtained a 
furlough and won a bride in the person of Miss 
Ilelene Whitman of Cumberland. Both men 
are determined sons of Uncle Sam and, doubt- 
less, will give as good an account of tliemselve.s 
wnen they go to France as have those Baltimore 
:in(l Ohio boys who are already "over there." 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



55 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, Secretory, 
Y. M. C. A. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



G. H. Winslow Chairman, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. James B. Grier. Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 

Motive Power Department 
W. M. Grant Boiler Foreman 

H. A. Bright Gang Leader 

C. J. A YERS Gang Leader 

A. F. Kreglow ! Storekeeper 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher 

N. Tippet Foreman, Car Shop 

H. A. Barefield Assistant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

J. J. Desmond Gang Leader 

G. Valentine Yard Engine Dispatcher 

B, Howard Assistant Foreman 

R. Heindrich Foreman, Station 

Transportation Department 

P. H. Deleplane Train Director 

L. T. Keane Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 

Maintenance of Way Department 
W. M. Cardwell Master Carpenter 

F. W. Hodges .Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

H. L. Bell .'.Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

A.M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Richmond Signal Maintainer 



About three hundred and fifty employes of 
the Washington Terminal Company partici- 
pated in the Liberty Loan Day parade. They 
made a fine appearance in the march down 
Pennsylvania Avenue, and compared favorably 
with any other section of the fifty thousand 
persons who took part in the parade. The 
section was led by W. J. Wilson, superintendent, 
followed by the officials of the Company. A 
band playing martial airs, under the leadership 
of C. W. Guest, kept the line in step. The ser- 
vice flag, containing 112 stars, made by the 
Washington Terminal Women's Auxiliary of 
the Red Cross, under direction of Mrs. W. W. 
Bowie, Mrs. S. J. Harry, Mrs. W. L. Whiting, 
Mrs. M. B. Tyng, Mrs. C. R. McKinsey, Mrs. 
C. S. Heritage and Mrs. Esther Hughes, was 
one of the most attractive in line. Mr. Brad- 
ford, draughtsman in the engineering depart- 
ment, worked out the design suggested by the 
ladies. The Women's section of the Washing- 
ton Terminal employes, headed by Miss Marie 
McGrain, was greeted with frequent applause 
along the line of march and the railroad men 
felt proud of them. All the departments of 
the Company were well represented. The em- 
ployes signified their earnestness in boosting 
the Third Liberty Loan, not only in marching 
in the parade, but also by subscribing for over 
$100,000 of bonds. Most of the men already 
hold First and Second Liberty Bonds. 

Hon. Clarence B. Miller, Congressman from 
Minnesota, gave an interesting address before 
employes and friends of the Washington Termi- 
nal Company, April 25. Last year Congress- 
man Miller spent several months in the Euro- 
pean war countries studying the war in all its 
phases, visiting our army "over there" and the 
armies of our allies, from the training camps 
to the front l^ne trenches. He told, out of his 



personal knowledge, many interesting stories 
of camp and trench life, conditions, overseas, 
and causes that brought on the war. He in- 
spired enthusiasm among his hearers and all 
went away with renewed determination to do 
all possible to help win the war. At the close 
of his address several thousand dollars' worth 
of bonds were subscribed to the Third Liberty 
Loan. 

The meeting was presided over by superin- 
tendent Wilson, who spoke of the great oppor- 
tunity for railroad men to show their loyalty 
and to help our army in the war for liberty, 
justice and humanity. George O'Comior and 
our own ''Matt" Horne delighted the audience 
with patriotic songs. 

As well as subscribing to the Liberty Bonds 
the employes of the Company have bought, to 
date, about $5,000 worth of War Savings 
Stamps. A committee for 1918, representing 
the different departments of the Company, was 
appointed to explain and push the sale of thrift 
stamps and certificates and several meetings 
were held and addressed by prominent men 
of the city, but especial mention should be made 
of the addresses of M. O. Leighton and C. W. 
Darr. The committee consisted of J. T. Nolan, 
O. J. Rider, B. R. Tolson, C. S. Heritage, G. F. 
Harbin, C. B. Cramer, M. E. Horne, W. J. 
Fittall, C. B. Vincent, E. Birch, C. H. Freed, 
J. A. Hanley, W. F. Hayes, E. G. Valentine, 
B. W. White, O. Norris, A. C. Hudson, R. E. 
Davis, W. H. Hobbs, W. C. Tilghman, L. E. 
Sullivan, W. L. Bruchey, C. A. McMahon, E. S. 
White, T. J. Bridges, P. H. Delaplaine and 
James McCauley. 

Assistant yardmaster James McCauley leads 
the "Liberty Loan boosters," having obtained 
subscribers for over $10,000 in the yards. 

Thrift stamps can be purchased at the mileage 
bureau in the main waiting room or at the office 
of the Terminal Railroad Y. M. C. A. 

Arrangements are being made for an enter- 
tainment in the gymnasium for the benefit of 
the Red Cross. The program will be an ex- 
ceptionally good one and all railroad men and 
friends should be present and help the work 
along. 



Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting, Chief Clerk 

We are now in the midst of a strenuous 
"Third Liberty Loan" campaign. All our 
spare moments are being devoted to bringing 
the boys in line to purchase bonds, not that 
they need very much persuasion to induce them 
to invest, and so far, up to the time of writing 
these notes, our campaign has been very success- 
ful. We hope to have a long list of subscribers 
to report to the treasurer before the week is 
ended. 

Our official force has been recently augmented 
by the appointment of C, R. Grimm as assistant 
agent. Mr. Grimm comes to us from Parkers- 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



burg, W. Va., at which station he has been in 
the service of the Baltimore and Ohio for a 
number of years, in the capacity of cashier, 
chief clerk and in other positions. We all ex- 
tend Mr. Grimm a hearty welcome and hope 
that he will continue to be with us for a long 
time to come. 

We are very glad to welcome back to his 
position as yard clerk, Thomas P. DeVaughan, 
who underwent an operation for appendicitis 
some time ago. He says he has thoroughly 
recovered from the operation and is ready for 
all the work that may come his way. 

Our coal clerk, E. C. Scaggs, had a serious 
attack of acute indigestion one morning in the 
office, but prompt action on the part of those 
around revived him sufficiently to enable him 
to be taken to his home, and after a day's rest 
he appeared at his usual place the following 
morning. It takes more than a thing like 
''acute indigestion" to knock out a veteran 
like "Eugene." 

We had a patriotic meeting the other morning 
on our platform, at which our freight agent, 
D. M. Fisher, addressed the entire platform 
force. He impressed on them the necessity of 
doing the very best work they are capable of, 
as much depends on railroad men at the present 
time if the soldier boys now at the front, and 
others ready to go, are to be properly cared 
for.* Mr. Fisher called particular attention to 
the message of Director General McAdoo of 
March 19, in which he placed railroad men in a 
preferred class, as they are necessary at the 
present time in the work of forwarding supplies 
to the soldiers. But he also reminded the men 
that there is a bill before Congress now which, 
if it becomes a law, will make it necessary for 
every railroad man up to the age of forty years 
to report, and become liable for active service. 
Mr. Fisher urged all the men to be patriotic 



and remember that they are now a part of the 
United States Government organization, and 
that it is the duty of everyone to cooperate 
with the officials at all times, as cooperation 
and the feeling that we have one great object 
in view, are the only means by which the war 
can be won, and above all other things, WE 
MUST WIN THIS WAR! 

The accompanying photograph will undoubt- 
edly be of great interest to Baltimore and Ohio 
"Old Timers," who will readily recognize the 
faces of those portrayed. 

It is "Old Number 590," well-known to 
Baltimore and Ohio men, showing her engineer, 
Harmon Hessen, ready to take her out. This 
photograph was taken at Martinsburg, W. Va., 
in the year 1892. 

A Well Spent Day 

By B. W. L. Whiting 
Washington, D. C. 

That is a day well spent, 
When memory dwells 
On daily tasks with ardor done, 
On problems solved, and victories won ! 
That is a day well spent, 
A day that tells ! 

That is a day well spent. 
If we can say 
One word a brother's doubt to clear, 
Perchance some saddened heart to cheer! 
That is a day well spent, 
A happy day ! 

That were a day well spent, 
If twilight brought 
The memory of a kindly smile. 
Making a brother's task worth while; 
That were a day well spent, 
A gladsome thought ! 




"()\A) .v.i(j •-i:n(;inioi-I{ iiau.mon iiI'JSSEN 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, V. F. Riley 

Divisional Safety Committee 



L. FiNEGAN Chairman, Superintendent of Shops 

E. P. Poole Vice-Chairman, Asst. Supt. of Shops 

V. F. Riley Secretary, Secretary to Supt. of Shops 

.1 . Howe General Foreman 

H. A. Beaumont General Car Foreman 

G. H. Kapinos Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

Dr. F. H. Diggs Assistant Medical Examiner 

P. F. Wagner Shop Hand, Erecting Shop 

H. T. Stickell. . Boilermaker, Boiler Shop 

G. F. Klein Piece Work Inspector, No. 1 Machine Shop 

E. B. Bunting Machinist, No. 2 Machine Shop 

W. H. Robinson Pipe Fitter, Pipe and Tin Shop 

G. M. KiSER Moulder, Foundries and Re-Rolling Mill 

J. T. Giles Blacksmith, Blacksmith Shop 

G. Schm.\le , Machine Operator, Bolt and Forge Shop 

W. P. May Machinist, Air Brake Shop 

C. Kessler Patternmaker, Pattern Shop 

A. G. Mercer Machinist, No. 3 Machine Shop 

and Steel Car Plant 

T. U. Dover Shop Hand, Tender and Tender Paint Shop 

H. Alker Shop Hand, Axle Shop and Power Plant 

J. E. Leary Gang Foreman, Freight Car Track 

J. Jankiewici Car Builder, Passenger Car Erecting Shop 

W. F. Zoellers Upholsterer, Passenger Car Plant, 

Finishing and Upholstering Shops 

J. J. P*itsinger Mill Machine Hand, Saw Mill 

and Cabinet Shops 

W.' Banahan Foreman, Stores Department 



Isaac Aleshire, one of Mar3dand's "First 
800" and the first Stores Department em- 
ploye to join the forces of Uncle Sam, died at 
the Naval Hospital at Portsmouth, Va., a 
victim of pneumonia. He was the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James Aleshire, of 214 East Lafayette 
Avenue, and was born June 19, 1898. He en- 
tered the service of the Baltimore and Ohio 
January 11, 1917, as a-clerk in the Stores De- 
partment, which position he held until April 
11, 1917, when he obtained a military furlough 
to join the ranks of Maryland's "800." At the 
time of his death, Mr. Aleshire was stationed 
on the U. S. S. "Charleston." He was buried 
with military honors from the residence of his 
parents, eight soldiers from Camp Meade 
acting as pallbearers. 

We extend our sincere sympathy to the be- 
reaved parents, and regret that we must place 
the first gold star in Mt. Clare's service flag, 
although we are proud to claim Mr. Aleshire 
as one of our bo3^s. 

There was much merriment at the seventh 
annual dance and entertainment held by the 
Mt. Clare Welfare, Athletic and Pleasure Asso- 
ciation at Lehmann's Hall on April 1 1 . Although 
the weather man was unkind in that the evening 
was dreary, the attendance was far in' excess 
of that expected. 

The program was opened by the association's 
recently organized orchestra, directed by C. 
W. Hake and led by Louis Schwatora, which 
had been practicing for several weeks in prep- 
aration for the affair. The Star-Spangled 
Banner was the opening number and was fol- 
lowed by several other fine selections. The 
orchestra is deserving of warm praise for its 
accomplishments, which are parallel with those 
of many an older organization. 

One of the most interesting as well as one of 
the most entertaining features of the evening 
was Miss Katherine Hook's delightful act. 



She won much applause. J. D. Wright's solo 
was also well received. Graceful and pleasing 
were the three little toe dancers, the Stickell 
Sisters and Miss Bauer. They made a decided 
"hit." A trio that helped make the affair a 
succesw^ was that composed of the Messrs. 
Jefferson, Hittel and Kuhl. They are songsters 
of promise. Another trio that was in fine 
voice was that comprising the Messrs. Beau- 
mont, Forney and McCarthy. The closing 
feature of the entertainment was a playlet en- 
titled "Precious Baby," written by James E. 
Tatum, of the paint shop at Mt. Clare. Miss 
Lillian Land and Charles Henchen were the 
"stars" in this act, which was delightful and 
clever. A word of praise should be said for 
Miss Stella Hittel, who accompanied the soloists 
at the piano and who was untiring in her efforts 
to make the affair a success. Much credit is 
due her for the enjoyable evening. At the close - 
of the entertainment prizes, consisting of 
leather purses and neckties, were aw^arded. 

Then, "on with the dance, let joy be uncon- 
fined," was the word of the night. The hall 
was decorated with patriotic colors and em- . 
blems of the association. Lights shone near 
each flag and emblem and when the signal was 
given to commence the terpsichorean art, all 
bright lights w^ere extinguished. The effect 
of the decorations was beautiful. The affair 
was so enjoyable that much regret was felt 
when the closing number was played. 

Needless to say, the refreshment hall had 
many visitors until the "wee sma' hours." 
The association supplied a liberal quantity 
of ice cream and cake. 

The program was in charge of H. A. Beau- 
mont, chairman of the entertainment com- 
mittee, and, imder his direction, was one of 
the most successful affairs held by the asso- 
ciation. Mr. Beaumont is a "top notcher" 
when he takes a hand in conducting dances or 
entertainments. 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
Thomas R. Rees, Secretary to Superintendent 
W. C. MoNTiGNANi, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
Laura E. Lingamfelter, Stenographer, Mainte- 
nance of Way Department 

Division Artist 
Mable R. Crawford, Tonnage Clerk, Division 
Accountant' s Office 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Deneen Chairman, Superintendent 

H. W. Grenoble. . .Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welshonce Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainma.ster, East End 

L.J. WiLMOTH Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechainc 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

Dr. J. A. DoRNER Medical Examiner 

Dr. J. H. Mayer Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 



58 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



W. D. Strouse Joint Agent 

I>. O. Miller Car Foreman, East End 

R. A. TuLL Car Foreman, West End 

F. L. Leyh Storekeeper 

K. A. Workman Storekeeper 

Robert Childers Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

I. S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Tatlor Master Carpenter 

W. L. Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. MoNTiGNANi. .Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
M. E. MtJLLiN. . .Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. C. Ha USER Conductor 

F. Haddix Engineer 

H. H. Grimm Fireman 

J. D. Defibaugh Machinist 

C. W. Robinson Car Inspector 

F. B. Rathke Yard Brakeman 

Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association 
of Cumberland, Md. 

President 

Grit-fin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 



Vice-Presidents 
F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

F. P. Pfahler Master Mechanic 

E C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

A. J. Kelly General Yardmaster 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secretary 

T. R. Rees Secretary to Superintendent 

The accompanying pictures sh.ow that some 
of the stations along the South Branch Sub- 
Division of the Cumberland Division, between 
Green Spring and Petersburg, W. Va., is a lumber 
producing territory. Large shipments of ties, 
bark and mine props are forwarded from Rom- 
ney. Cunningham, twenty miles further west, 
is also a heavy shipping point for the same class 
of freight. It being necessary to take advant- 
age of good roads in dry weather, quantities 





H MMKR liKADV FOR SHIPMENT ON THE C^UMBERLAND DIVISION 
1— Rornrirry, W. 2, 3, 4— ( 'unnin<;luun, \V. \ a. 5, G— Petcr.-ihurg, W. \ a. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



59 





DIVISION ACCOUNTANT'S FORCE, CUMBERLAND, MD. 



of ties, mine props and sawed lumber are accu- 
mulated at that station to be forwarded when 
bad roads exist. Petersburg, the western 
terminus of the branch, as the picture indicates, 
also furnished quantities of ties, sawed lumber 
and mine props. 

The above photograph represents the division 
accounting force at Cumberland, Md. 



Standing, left to right: C. F. Moehle, C. W. 
Fries, N. K. Harrison, R. M. Bernard, W. M. 
Naughton, E. C. Robertson, W. M. Gatehouse, 
R. F. Heron, D. M. Entler, Miss Bowden, Miss 
Zihlman, Miss Ambrose, G. F. Messman, A. P. 
Connell, J. B. Higgins, J. W. Kirk, F. P. Keyser, 
R. J. Ward, E. W. Bryner, F. R. Reynolds, 
A. Fuller. 





)ME OF JAMES CASSIDY, ALTAMONT, MD. 



00 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Seated, left to right: E. R. Clark, C. W. 
Shaffer, Miss Burns, Miss Ritter, Miss Bauer, 
Miss Dicken, J. E. Taylor, Miss Wirgman, 
Miss Barrick, E. D. Keech. 

The picture on page 59 shows one of the first ^ 
properties that was purchased by the aid of the ' 
Savings Feature of the Relief Department, and 
was the home of James B. Cassidy of Altamont, 
]\Id. In order that the date and claim of being 
onie of the first properties on the System in 
which the Relief Deaprtment was interested 
that department was consulted and advised as 
follows: "The search we have made indicates 
that the first loan was made to a widow on 
property at Baltimore, and the second loan, 
about ten days later, was to James B. Cassidy 
to assist him in purchasing a property at 
Altamont, Md." 

Effective May 1 J. L. Hayes was appointed 
division freight agent, with office at Cum- 
berland, Md., and jurisdiction over the Cum- 
berland Division, Martinsburg to Grafton, both 
exclusive, including branches. 

Keyser 

The employes of the Baltimore and Ohio at 
Keyser showed their patriotism in fine style 
when, on April 5, they subscribed for and raised 
an American flag to open the Third Liberty 
Loan campaign. Governor Cornwell and 
Brigadier General Heiner, of Camp Lee, were 
present and made stirring speeches. Between 
the passenger and freight stations is a large 
lawn known as Community Park and in the 
center a tall flag staff was erected. The flag 
which formerly had flown from the staff was 
dirty and wind-whipped and, through the efforts 
of Harry B. Kight and O. S. W. Fazenbaker, it 
was replaccd by a new one. 




MASTER MECHANIC'S FORCE, KEYSER, W. VA. 



Governor Cornwell, in true American style, 
paid a beautiful tribute to the emblem and 
impressed upon his auditors the fact that we at 
home should buy bonds in order to back up the 
boys who have left our shores to meet the Hun 
on the battle-torn fields of France. ''We 
should give up our money to help the heroes 
who are willing to give up their lives," was the 
gist of the Governor's address. 

General Heiner, in a short address, referred 
to the boys in khaki from the vicinity of Keyser 
and who are now at Camp Lee. He spoke of 
the men in eulogistic terms. 

About one thousand school children, all 
carrying small American flags, were there and 
added to the patriotic spirit which pervaded 
the atmosphere. Mcllwee's band furnished 
the music, and their patriotic airs were stirring. 




THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 



The photograph on page 60 is of the master 
mechanic's office and force, Keyser, W. Va. 
Reading from left to right, back row: G. P. 
Murphy, G. W. Avers, M. OrndorfP, S. D. Blair, 
R. G. Lippold, J. M. Salgard, E. E. Crosslin 
(chief clerk). 

Front row: Misses E. Lee Harmison, Verda 
Smith, Nell Crabtree, Ruth Welch and Lena 
Crabtree, "Tater" Arnold and V. L. Harrison. 

The ''mascot" is J. W. Smith, center. 

An enjoyable entertainment was given by the 
Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club of Cumberland 
recently at Keyser, W. Va., and was such a 
success that the members were requested to 
return for another engagement at an early date. 
The folks of Keyser were delighted with the 
affair and showed their approval by their 
applause. As one Baltimore and Ohio man 
puts it: "It was anight of minstrelsy and song," 
and he expressed the hope that "the 'fellers' 
would call again and bring their ukelele quar- 
tette." The club is always welcome in that 
section of West Virginia. 

George W. Sturmer made a patriotic speech 
at the shop and pointed out the value of the 
industrial soldier to his country. His talk was 
much enjoyed and was deeply appreciated. 

"That 'old fellow' was no slouch at speech- 
making," one of the shop men said, and every 
one agrees that he was "out there." They 
have worked harder ever since to turn out all 
the equipment possible to help win the war. 

On April 10 W. W. Wood spoke in the Keyser 
High School auditorium. He made a fine 
address, after which lantern slides and motion 
pictures depicting war scenes were shown on 
the screen, Mr. Wood explaining each picture. 
The auditorium was well filled with the town 
people, business men and Baltimore and Ohio 
employes. 

The Baltimore and Ohio men at Keyser are a 
patriotic "bunch" and we appreciate the fact 
that the Baltimore and Ohio sends men here 
to enlighten us on the war. Always glad to see 
them. Hope they send some more. 

Announcement of the birth of a daughter to 
Mr. and Mrs. Homer Johnston, of Garrett, Ind., 
master mechanic's office, have been received. 
Homer is a former Baltimore and Ohio Keyser 
boy. Congratulations, "Pop." 

"Neuter" Wright, former yard brakeman, 
has landed safely in France. "Neuter" will 
charm all the French girls with his smile. 
Good luck, "Neuter. "^ 



Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

The employes of the Baltimore and Ohio 
working in the shops here, together with many 
other employes from Cumberland, in the yards, 
men of the main line living at Martinsburg, and 
quite a number of the Veterans' Association, 
gave quite an exhibition of loyalty to our gov- 
ernment when, on April 6, Martinsburg and 




J. H. COPENHAVER 



Berkley County held a monster, parade to 
help launch the Third Liberty Loan. The line 
formed by the Baltimore and Ohio boys was 
the largest of any industrial organization. The 
shop men carried a handsome banner on which 
was inscribed "Maintenance of Way Repair 
Shops," and "No Slackers Here." A service 
flag on which there were twelve stars was also 
carried in the parade. 

The Liberty Loan drive was a great success 
and the men of the shop feel gratified that they 
had a hand in making it a "go." Our shop, to 
a man, is for America first, last and all the time. 

Above is a photograph of Joseph H. Copen- 
haver, who was first employed in the black- 
smith shop at Martinsburg under master me- 
chanic G. W. Edwards, March 4, 1881, and 
afterwards transferred to the boiler shop and 
learned the trade of boilermaker. In 1897 he 
was transferred to the bridge shops at Martins- 
burg, In 1901 he was assigned to the water 
station department, returning to the bridge 
department at Martinsburg April 15, 1903, 
in which he is at this time giving high and 
efficient service. During all of his thirty-seven 
years' service Mr. Copenhayer has rendered 
the best of service and faithful in the discharge 
of his duty to the Baltimore and Ohio, which 
entitles him to a high place in the ranks of the 
Veterans. Mr. Copenhaver stands A No. 1, 
and it affords us pleasure to "render unto Caesar 
the things that are Caesar's." 

The lecture given by W. W. Wood in the loft 
of the machine shop was enjoyed by our men. 
Mr. Wood is a splendid speaker and the pictures 
of the war were fine. A large audience greeted 
the lecturer in the Y. M. C. A. at night, when 
a meeting was held to which the general public 
was invited. Those who heard Mr. Wood at 



62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



the shop and the "Y" are hoping for another 
opportunity of hearing him again. 

Superintendent Brantner held an interesting 
noon hour meeting in the interest of the Liberty 
Loan. J. R. Poland, chairman of the loan 
committee, Third Ward, and Mr. Brantner, 
addressed the men. Quite a number of the 
bonds of previous issues have been purchased 
by our men and the present issue will go close 
to the fifty per cent. sale. Twelve stars in the 
service flag; buying the bonds; keeping our 
efficiency to a high standard; conserving food — 
surely we are fighting the Hun! 

A stairway has been placed at the Burke 
Street bridge giving a convenient and safe 
means of getting to and from the shop for all 
employes living in the south and southwestern 
parts of the city. The stairway leads up from 
Burke Street on the east side of the bridge and 
workmen using it can get to the shop without 
crossing the tracks. The stairway is built 
of steel and concrete, and is a fine job. 

The sad intelligence coming to the shop on 
April 2 announcing the death of L. D. Davis, 
supervisor of scales and weighing, was received 
with profound regret. Mr. Davis' interests 
were closely linked with the shop here, where 
much of the work under his supervision was 
repaired and fabricated. That he was a deep 
thinker and planned for the future is amply 
proven by the measure of success he attained 
in his very responsible position. The follow- 
ing quotation found in a note book given by 
Mr. Davis to foreman Oliver of the scale shop 
is further proof of the above statement: ''As 
it was necessary for a Gorgas to make the 
Isthmus of Panama sanitary before the canal 
could be built, so railroading, instead of work- 
ing for the present and seen losses, must pro- 
vide for the future and unseen losses." 

Whether this quotation is original, or 
gathered from some other source, does not alter 
its silent testimony to the splendid qualities of 
the man. The loss of the services of such a 
man as he, is one of the "unseen losses" for 
which it is most difficult to provide. 



Monongah Division 

. S. Jknkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

. F. Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 

iKiU Wii,80N Chairman, Suporintendonl , (inifton 

\\< ('lAiNd . . .' Triiinn)a.st(!r, Gnifton 

A. Andkkhon MaHtcr Mechanic, Cirafton 

K. DoTHON Road Foreman, Grafton 

. r. Kbehlv Division Engineer, Grafton 

. h. MiLLEH Car Foreman, Grafton 

(). Marti.v Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg 

II. C'. A. HiNHKL Medical Examiner, Grafton 

H. E. A. Fleetwood Medical Examiner, Clarksburg 

H. Phinnev Agent, Grafton 

D. Anthony Agent, P'airmont 

11. Wei>L8 Agent, Clarksburg 

. L. SrHiLL Agent, Weston 

. J. Hoover Agent, liuckhannon 

. E. Clayton AMsistant Chief Clerk to Superint(?ndent 

Miss Ethel liradford, Hccretary to division 
iperintendent, was operated on at St. Mary's 



hospital for appendicitis. The operation was a 
success and we hope to have Miss Bradford back 
with us soon. 

Storekeeper T. L. Nuzum and Miss Anna 
Kenney were married April 22 at the home of 
the bride. Congratulations. 

It is a pleasure to the old employes of the 
superintendent's office to welcome "Dick" 
Kelley, dispatcher, back to the office, after 
having been located at Lumberport for the 
past two years. 

Wheeling Division 

Correspondent 
C. F. Miller, Office of Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. V. Smith Superintendent 

E. C. Wight Division Engineer 

F. C. Schorndorfer Master Mechanic 

C . Malone Trainmaster 

M.J. Walsh Road Foreman of Engines 

M. E. Cartwright Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

F. M. Garber Car Foreman 

Dr. D. L. Norris Medical Examiner 

H. H. Tederick Track Supervisor 

H. K. Reid Engineer 

G. E. Gate WOOD Conductor 

L. O. SwANN : Fireman 

H. Parker Machinist Helper 

L. C. Nichols Brakeman 

A. J. Sonnefeld Secretary 



Ohio River Division 

S. S. RouscH, Office of Superintendent 

Miss Helen Wright, Offix^e of Division Engineer 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Root Superintendent 

F. G. MoRAN Trainmaster 

J. G. KiRCHER Road Foreman of Engines 

O. J. Kelly Master Mechanic 

L. E. Haislip Division Engineer 

F. R. Davis Terminal Trainmaster 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

E. Chapman Captain of Police 

F. A. Carpenter Agent, Parkersburg 

S. E. Eastburn Agent, Yardmaster, Huntington 

H. F. Owens Secretary 

Rotating Members 

P. M. Roe". Engineer 

O. W. McCarty Fireman 

H. Neal Conductor 

M. F. Caldwell Brakeman 

A. C. Smith Car Department 

C. R. Taylor Locomotive Department 

J. E. Rosier Stores Department 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, G. li. Gymkk, Secretary to 
Supcrinlcndent, CI eve 1 and 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. Ti. Green Superinlendent 

(J. H. Gymkr Secretary 

.1. J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. .F. Head Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

(J. K. Galloway Master Mechanic 

C'. Loux Roatl Foreman of F.ngines 

G. IT. Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A.J. Bell Terminal Agent 

Dh. a. a. Church Medical lOxamincr 

(;..!. Maihch Claim Agent 

M. 10. Tuttle Division Operator 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 



Rotating Members (to serve six months) 

J. Hickman. Relief Agent, Cleveland 

F. E. Weeks Dis^patcher, Cleveland 

P. EsposiTO Section Foreman, Akron 

T. Ridley Carpenter Foreman, Canton 

D. Robinson Brakeman, Lorain 

W. L. Cutter Engineer, Lorain 

E. C. Haviland Engineer, Cleveland 

N. WiLBOis Conductor, Akron 

J. F. Hert Conductor, Cleveland 

J. J. Hurley Enginehouse Foreman, Cleveland 

V. Lucas Steel Car Foreman, Lorain 

Everyone who attended safety moving pic- 
ture shows demonstrated by our Company and 
held at Akron, Ohio, on the evening of March 
25; at Cleveland shops, noon hour, March 27, 
and at Lorain, Ohio, on the evening of April 2, 
were well pleased. 

G. W. Gordon left his duties as maintenance of 
way clerk at Cleveland, April 1, to serve with 
the colors at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio. 
He writes, "some people may like the cows and 
chickens, but this is the life." Suppose it is if 
you don't weaken. Everyone is anxious to see 
George make good. 

Harry Kline, former trainmaster's clerk at 
Cleveland, is again with us, performing duties 
of maintenance of way clerk. 

T. C. Bumgarner, brakeman on trains Nos. 48 
and 47, spent his honeymoon in Baltimore and 
Washington, having been married on March 
20 to Miss Elsa M. Esch. The Rev. Meldrum, 
of the Old Stone Church, Cleveland, officiated. 
His friends and fellow employes wish him and 
his wife a long and happy life. 

William Huber, alias "Shrimp Flynn," office 
boy in the superintendent's office, is helping 
Uncle Sam by buying War Saving Stamps. 

C. J. Wilcox, assistant ticket agent at Cleve- 
land, of "Beau Brummel" fame, has been lately 
forced to a back seat by the activities of 
"Father Time" Beggs, car distributer. 

Edward Keffer, stationmaster at Cleveland, 
was recently presented with a bird labelled a 
"German Turkey." Said bird was identified 
by several as being a wild duck, a sea gull and 
a wild goose, and all the time it was a loon. 

Roundhouse foreman J. J. Hurley has re- 
cently visited friends at Zanesville. 

Machine shop foreman Voss, at Cleveland, 
who has been attending automobile school from 
two to four nights a month all winter, is now 
getting practical experience on his new Ford 
machine, which he recently purchased. 

E. C. Mishler, former night chief dispatcher's 
clerk in "V" office, is now holding down the 
dispatcher's chair on the east end, and we are 
all pulling for his success. 

Dispatcher F. E. Weeks was ill recently. 
He is now back on the job. 

Miss Emma Suek, of the terminal agent's 
office, Akron, who was called home because of 
the illness of her mother, has returned to her 
desk and the electric cars have again resumed 
operations on the Kent line. 

"Doc" Childs, who left our service some 
time ago to accept a position in traffic depart- 



WHY WEAR 
Overalls? 



Pat. 
June 8, 
1915 




When 
there is 
some- 
thing 

Lots 
Better 

The 
Patented 

Sensible" 

is Different 




Patented but- 
ton-down skirt 
showing neat 
jacket effect. 




Skirt up show 
ing- suGpenders 
which are at- 
tached to back 
of jacket. 



and better than any 

other work garment. At 
your dealers or write for 
descriptive circular. 

Popular Prices 



JOHNSTON & LAR MER Showmg the 

urn Pntinnuw convenientdrop 

MFG. COMPANY, Beat arrange- 
Wichita. Kans. 





ment of the American Sewer Pipe Co., at East 
Akron, has returned and taken up the duties 
of chief clerk to terminal agent Troescher, at 
Howard Street, 

Dispatcher C. M. Trisch, of the Akron office, 
was ill with the grippe for a few days. Extra 
dispatcher Rinker, of Cleveland, relieved him. 

Frank Chapman, the "genial gentleman from 
West Virginia," has been promoted to chief rate 
clerk at Akron, How^ard Street station, vice 
"Pop" Taylor, who resigned to accept a simi- 
lar position at Clarksburg, W. Va. We wish 
"Chappie" success. 

Frank Marren, the veteran conductor on the 
Elyria shifter, recently took a two weeks' vaca- 
tion. Conductor Harry Olmutz relieved him. 
No one seems to begrudge him his annual re- 
creation, as they all feel that the faithful ser- 
vices he rendered through the long hard winter 
justified a much needed rest and all hope he 
was much benefited. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark 

.1. P. DoRSEY Vice-Chair man, Trainmaster, Newark 

C. R. DiEMAR Division Engineer, Newark 



64. THE BALTIMORE AND O 

R. A. Vernon Road Foreman of Engines, Newark 

W. D. Johnston Master Mechanic, Newark 

A. R. Claytor Division Claim Agent, Newark 

D. J. Host T. M. & C. T. D.. Columbus 

C. D. Miller Shopman, Newark 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner, Newark 

F. Backenstos Conductor, Newark 

W. H. RissLER Firem.an, Newark 

L. C. Decker .Engineer, Newark 

O. A. Collins Car Repairer, Newark 

F. Strear. Blacksmith, Newark 

D. E. Shock Yard Conductor, Newark 



After having served the Company for forty 
years, Paul L. Sutor, veteran train baggageman, 
has applied for retirement. Mr. Sutor was 
born in Columbus, Ohio, on March 2, 1853 and 
has been in the service since May, 1878. His 
record with the Company is clear, and it is 
hoped that he will live many more years to 
enjoy the fruits of his labor. He is a man of 
kindly manner and has ever been loyal to his 
employers as well as a host of friends, who, 
without doubt, have always enjoyed associa- 
tion with him and join in well wishes for his 
future. 

Below is a photograph of Clyde F. Farmer, 
formerly dairy freight agent with this Com- 
pany at Newark, and at present a member of 
the Thirty-sixth Engineers at Camp Grant, 111. 

The many friends of David Click, agent- 
operator at Plymouth, regret to learn of his 
death, which occurred on April 12, after an ill- 
ness of three days from pneumonia. He was 
born on July 11, 1882, and first entered the ser- 
vice of the Baltimore and Ohio on October 4, 
1901, as a telegraph operator and worked at 
various offices on the division until April, 1907, 
when he was selected to fill the agency at 




CLYDE F. FARMER 



EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




FRANK M. HOWARD 



Ankenytown. He was transferred to the posi- 
tion of agent at Plymouth on May 25, 1909. 

It is with regret that we report the death of 
fireman Everett L. Hamilton, which occurred 
on March 30 at his home near Barnesville, 
Ohio, where he has been confined account of 
illness for the last six months. Mr. Hamilton 
entered the service on April 9, 1907, as a brake- 
man at Zanesville and resigned from that posi- 
tion on June 27, 1907. He re-entered the ser- 
vice as a fireman on May 21, 1917, and was taken 
sick shortly after that time. 

Above is a photograph of Frank M. Howard, 
who was born at Cameron, W. Va., on February 
11, 1856. Mr. Howard spent his boyhood days 
on his father's farm near that city. He entered 
the service of our Company on his twenty-first 
birthday as a brakeman and worked between 
Wheeling and Grafton until February, 1879, 
when he resigned from the service to enter 
another line of work. He came to Newark on 
April 3, 1881, and entered the service as a fire- 
man and on October 2, 1883, was promoted to 
engineer, which position he has held to the 
present time, with the exception that he served 
as an assistant road foreman of engines from 
August 20, 1903, to January 1, 1904. He has 
the distinction of ruiming the last camel 
engine operating in through freight service on 
the division. Mr. Howard possesses marked 
ability and great skill in handling locomotives, 
reflected to a degree by his service record, 
which is clear, entries of merit being the only 
ones on his record. Since June, 1899, he has 
worked as a passenger engineer on the Newark- 
('incinnati through runs. Possessing exemplary 
I)erKonal habits as a man and efficiency and 
loyalty as an employe of this Company, he can 
enjoy that satisfaction resulting from having 
well served his employer and fellow-man. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



65 




Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Sup' t, Connellsville 
S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 

Connellsville 
C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Ass'i Sup't^ Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

M. H. Broughton Chairman, Superintendent 

C. M. Stone Assistant Superintendent 

A. E. McViCKER Trainmaster 

A. P. Williams ^ Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. F. H. Weidemann Medical Examiner 

G. M. Tipton Freight Agent 

W. G Carter Freight Agent 

C. A. Albright Freight Agent 

H. B. PiGMAN Division Operator 

F T. Robinson Engineer 

A. G. Watson Fireman 

J. E. Leckembv Conductor 

J. T. Deneen Brakeman 

H. T. Robinson Machinist 

J. G. Percy Boilermaker 

S.M.May Road Foreman of Engines 

J. S. GiLMORE Trainmaster 

J. J. Ryland Secretary 

On this page appear photographs of Mildred 
C, and Bert W. Howard, aged fourteen and 
twenty years respectively, daughter and son of 
conductor William Howard of Connellsville 
Division. It is needless to mention that Bert 
is doing his bit for democracy. He has spent 
three years in the navy and is at present aboard 
the "Denver," which vessel has been in convoy 
service for the past several months.. Three 
round-trips through Hun-infested seas is young 
Howard's proud record and he claims he enjoys 
it better every trip. He is also a very profi- 
cient writer and has contributed accounts of his 
trips to the Connellsville dailies, which have 
made excellent reading. As for Miss Howard, 




MILDRED C. HOWARD 



BERT W. HOWARD 

it is a safe bet to say that some lucky ''Sammie" 
—probably several — are wearing sweaters "over 
there" that have come from her hands. 

Great interest was manifested amongst the 
employes on the Connellsville Division towards 
boosting the subscriptions for the Third Liberty 
Loan, and it is certainly gratifying the way the 
employes on the S. & C. did their bit — a patri- 
otic duty, a safe investment, and an excellent 
way of saving money. We hope to "go over 
the top" by winning the honor flag for the 
Connellsville Division. 

H. L. Schneider, first trick operator at 
Hooversville telegraph office, has a grin from 
ear to ear — it's a big baby boy. Mother and 
son are both doing nicely. 

The sharp carve "Tates," near MacGregor 
Mines, between Rockwood and Somerset, was 
removed on April 9. This was brought about 
by releasing a great amount of slag and refuse 
at this point. The first train to pass over the 
new track was extra engine 6013 west, at 10.45 
a. m., April 9. 

During the past three months the notes from 
the Connellsville Division have been few; there- 
fore, the cooperation of all employes on the line 
is solicited, and will appreciate any notes or 
photographs sent to me from the employes con- 
cerned on the S. & C. Branch. — C. E. Reynolds. 

On Wednesday, March 6, the following motion 
pictures were shown in the auditorium of the 
New High School Building at Connellsville, Pa. : 
New Coal Piers in operation at Curtis Bay; 
Championship Baseball Game played by the 
Baltimore and Ohio teams competing for the 
Thompson and Davis Cups; Fire Fighting at 
Locust Point; The Rule of Reason. 

These pictures were shown in the interest of 
Safety First and it is felt that much good was 
derived from seeing them. The meeting was 



66 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



opened by an address by M. H. Broughton, 
superintendent of the Connellsville Division, 
after which several solos were given by Lester 
Crawford, which were enjoyed very much by 
the audience. Kiferle's Orchestra furnished 
very splendid music for the meeting. There 
was a fine turnout — about 550 — and all in all 
the meeting was a success. 

In the next column is a photograph of Daniel 
C. Hood, retired Baltimore and Ohio employe. 
Mr. Hood served in various capacities with the 
Company up until the time of his retirement 
in 1890, his last position being foreman of car 
inspectors at Connellsville, Pa. Mr. Hood 
was born in Chambersburg, Pa., in 1824 and his 
parents migrated to Fayette County one year 
later. At the present time Mr. Hood is acting 
superintendent of the Highland Chemical 
Company, located at Connellsville and 
although far past the alloted number of mile- 
stones, he is as hale and hearty as are most men 
of fifty years. Mr. Hood attributes his re- 
markable health and age to regular habits and 
clean living. He also says he is still loyal to 
the Baltimore and Ohio and makes it a point 
to see that practically all of the Highland 
Company's shipments travel via that line. 



Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondent, Earl To\^y, Office of Superin- 
tendent, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 

T. J. Brady Chairman, Superintendent 

T. W. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

J. M. MuEHLBAUER Secretary 

H. H. Marsh Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

R. B. Stout Superintendent of Shops 

A. J. Welse General Car Foreman 

F. Bryne Claim Clerk 

W. F. Deneke Terminal Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. a. J. BossYNS Medical Examiner 

G. S. DiETZ Brakeman 

Effective April 16 F. A. Dant was appointed 
assistant storekeeper, with headquarters at 
Tenth Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., vice J. B. Layne, 
furloughed for military duty. 

The Pittsburgh Division was well repre- 
sented in the Ladies' Liberty Loan parade held 
in Pittsburgh on Saturday, April 20, when one 
hundred of our patriotic girls marched. They 
were led by a band which played patriotic airs 
fitted for the occasion and featured the parade 
by the presence of women in their band. A 
banner bearing the Baltimore and Ohio name 
and carried by Misses Mary Delahanty and 
Emily Publow followed the band and Miss 
Helen Farrar, carrying an American flag, led 
the girls. 'J'he following were marshals: 
Misses Margaret Maloney, Lena Van Nort, 
Loretta Kinney, (iene Smith, Kdwi Corcoran 
and Mrs. Naomi Hetzel. 'I'o them much credit 
is due for the wonderful showing our girls made 
in this gr.'ind spectacle; of j)atriotism. 'J'heir 
strj^ight lines and tlxjir peppery step drew 
applause from the large crowd which had come 
from far and near. Never before has such 




DANIEL C. HOOD 



patriotism been displayed in this city as was 
shown by the women, who marched the entire 
distance (eight miles) in a drizzling rain. The 
officials and fellow-workers extend their heart- 
iest congratulations to the girls. 

It is a pleasure to announce the recent pro- 
motion of J. M. Courcey, tonnage clerk in the 
superintendent's office, to time clerk in the 
division accountant's office. Stick right to it 
''Joe." Accept our congratulations on your 
new position. 

Ross 'Hackett, messenger in the division 
accountant's office, has left the a#rvice of the 
Company to accept a position with the National 
Tube Company at McKeesport. Ross is a 
good boy and should succeed in his new posi- 
tion. We all wish him success in his new 
position. 

"Jack" Langford has been promoted from 
time clerk in the division accountant's office to 
chief clerk to the yardmaster at Willow Grove. 
"Jack" is missed very much, but we all wish 
him success. 

Miss Anne Gilday has accepted the vacancy 
as tonnage clerk in the superintendent's office, 
vice J. M. Courcey, promoted. 

Miss Loretta Kinney, utility clerk in the 
superintendent's office, came to work on 
Wednesday, April 24, with several new pieces 
of jewelry. Evidently she has passed another 
milestone. She is wearing a broad smile, too. 
Miss Kinney is a little modest and refused to 
tell us what milestone it was. 

Our new assistant chief clerk, H. H. Strome, 
has won many friends on the Pittsburgh Divi- 
sion. IFe is always willing to help a friend in 
need. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



67 



Latest dispatches from Camp Lee, Peters- 
burg, Va., advises us that former employes, 
W. H. Suckling and H. M. Hartigan, of the 
division accountant's office, are now enjoying 
camp life, and they are still living up to their 
good qualities as attested by their recent pro- 
motions to sergeant-major and corporal respec- 
tively. 

Motive power timekeeper E. J. Riley is the 
proud possessor of a little 'X^niversal" car and 
any Sunday or evening, after the completion of 
almost the working day, you can see ''Dick" 
driving the whole family about town. 

The little daughter of C, T. timekeeper E. C. 
Fisher, who has been very sick, is now pro- 
gressing very favorably and will soon be able 
to be about. 

The clerks of Pittsburgh held a euchre and 
dance, May 15, at Barker's Hall, Second 
Avenue and Elizabeth Street, Hazelwood. 
Everybody spent an enjoyable evening with 
old friends. 

New Castle Division 

Correspondents 
J. A. Lloyd, Chief Clerk to Superintendent 
C. S. Maynard, Operator, Chardon, Ohio 
V. P. McLaughlin, Operator, BD Tower, Akron 
Junction, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. W. VanHorn Chairman, Superintendent 

C. P. Angell Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

D. W. Cronin Division Engineer 

A. H. Hodges ; Master Mechanic 

T. K. Faherty Road Foreman of Engines 

James Aiken. , Agent, Youngstown, O. 

Dr. F. Dorse y Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne Claim Agent 

F. H. Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahill. . Division Operator 

W. Damron Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Master Carpenter 

J. J. FisHBURN Secretary 

Rotating Members 

E. J. Hunt Road Conductor, New Castle Junction 

G. C. Anderson Road Fireman, New Castle Junction 

S. O. Lewis Road Engineer, New Castle Junction 

N. Thatcher Machinist, New Castle Junction 

G. H. Glenn Yard Engineer, Haselton, O. 

F. D. Lancaster Yard Conductor, Painesville, O. 

Miss E. R. Biggerstaff Clerk, New Castle Junction 

Miss Pearl D. Clark. Chief Clerk to Agent, Youngstown, O. 

Patrick Foley, for twenty-six years crossing 
watchman at Phelps Street, Youngstown, Ohio, 
died at Youngstown City Hospital, April 6, 
from pneumonia. Mr. Foley was seventy-three 
years of age, and had been a resident of Youngs- 
town for forty-five years. He was very well 
known, having been a heater in the old Ma- 
honing Valley Works, afterwards made a part 
of the Republic Iron & Steel Co. For some 
time he was a policeman and later worked for 
the street department. He later followed 
contracting work at the mills in the Youngs- 
town District and then entered the service of 
the Baltimore and Ohio. Mr. Foley was born 
in Cork, Ireland. The Company loses the 
services of an honest and conscientious em- 
ploye in the demise of Mr. Foley. 

C. P. Angell, for the past four years senior 
trainmaster on the New Castle Division, has 



been promoted to assistant superintendent, 
Pittsburgh Division, in charge of Pittsburgh 
Terminals. We are all glad to see Mr. Angell 
going up the line and hope he will continue 
his advancement. 

P. F. Walthour, formerly employed with 
Baltimore and Ohio, and for several years dis- 
patcher at Gates Mills, Ohio, with the Cleve- 
land & Eastern Traction Company, has re- 
turned to the fold, having accepted position as 
clerk and operator at Niles, Ohio. 

John J. Green, second trick dispatcher on 
west end. New Castle Division, died at his 
home in New Castle on Friday afternoon, 
April 12, after a short illness. He leaves a wife 
and three daughters. Mr. Green was in ser- 
vice as operator and dispatcher on the P. & W. 
for a number of years, leaving the east for the 
western part of the L^nited States in 1904 and 

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68 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



worked for the Santa Fe and Chicago Great 
Western as operator and dispatcher, as well as 
being in business for himself. He returned to 
his old home in May, 1917, and secured a posi- 
tion as dispatcher on the Lake Branch, being 
located at Painesville during the Lake season 
and was placed on second trick, west end, at 
the closing of navigation season. The funeral 
was conducted from the residence, April 15. 
The pallbearers were W. P. Cahill, division 
operator, and train dispatchers A. F. Kelsey, 
J. M. Garner, J. A. Phelps and E. C. Bock and 
night chief dipsatcher C. M. Trussell. As one 
of the operators on the road expresses himself: 
■'Mr. Green having answered the last 'call,' let 
us all try to emulate his genial manners and 
strict attention to duty, thus bettering our 
own lives and those of our brother employes 
with whom we come in contact." 

""Paul D. Hunt, clerk to the car distributer, 
was united in marriage on April 6 to Miss 
Florence M. Spiers, the ceremony being per- 
formed by the Rev. A. J. Randies. A slight 
attack of the grippe delayed the honeymoon 
trip for a few days, the destination being that 
mecca of honeymooners — Niagara Falls. Paul 
is now back on the job looking very much 
satisfied with himself, and the best wishes of 
the force is extended to him and his bride. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Dramatic Society, 
composed of young ladies and men from the 
division offices, under the leadership of A. C. 
Harris, president, is rapidly whipping into 
shape a play which they expect to give in three 
f)r four weeks for the benefit of the Comfort 
Packet Committee. This society has been 
doing silent work and a good many of the 
employes are probably not aware of its exist- 
ance. Any employe desiring membership in 
this organization should communicate with 
A. C. Harris. 

The City Industrial Basketball League, 
composed of six teams from the various indus- 
tries in New Castle, dropped their last team 
and a team from the Baltimore and Ohio took 
over this place in the league, played six games 
anfl ended the season in third place. Messrs. 
McC^arthy, Hammond, Travers, Nicholson, 
Burnett, l3ickson and Sisley turned the trick, 
it is expectefi 1o get this aggregation together 
at Ihe first of next season and walk oft with 
the p(!nnant, which we feel can be done very 
nicely. 

Ah a side issue of the winter's bowling con- 
t(!HtH in the liallimore and Ohio League at 
New CJnstle, a sharp competition arose between 
1 fu! division accfjuntant's office; bunch and the 
other office men, who are located downstairs in 
thf division ofhces. S(!V(!ral h(!(s were played, 
.ill of which were won by the sup(;rin1 endc^nt's 
t« ani. The final series was won by the same 
learn and the division accountant's t(;am stood 
for tli(! dinner at tlie Elks' (Hub on April 11. 
After the dinner the division accouni ant's team 
felt HO good they decided to hav(; .'inotluir game 
riglit away, and again they were wallofjcd. 



One thing they do have, and that is — the 
staying quality, as they are dickering again 
for a return match. 

George Mace, who until lately was in the 
service of the Baltimore and Ohio at Kent, 
Ohio, as signalman, was laid to rest at Standing 
Rock Cemetery, Kent, Ohio, Wednesday, 
April 10. Mr. Mace resigned in order to serve 
his country, and was stationed at Camp Sheri- 
dan, Montgomery, Ala. He contracted pneu- 
monia, from which he died. He was buried with 
military honors. The 134th Field Artillery 
Band accompanied the body to his late home. 
The family has the sympathy of all who knew 
him. He was an only son. 

The daughter of Clem Emrick, one of our 
oldest employes at Akron Junction, died at her 
father's home on Perkins Street, Akron, April 
12, and w^as laid to rest April 15, together with 
her three-day old daughter. Mr. Emrick and 
family have the sympathy of all. 

We learn that H. D. Purdy, formerly first 
trick operator at BD Tower., who resigned 
several years ago to accept a position at Kent, 
Ohio, State Normal School, is again in the 
telegraph service at Cairo, Baltimore Division. 

The following changes in Telegraph Depart- 
ment have been made: 

J. J. Dieter, third BD to Nova thii'd; J. F. 
Titus, BD third, pending bid; A. Day, assigned 
third Niles Junction, no bids; H. S. W^eed, 
assigned second Haselton, no bids; W. R. 
Hargett, third Ohio Junction. 

Operators Ault and Titus doubled at BD 
Tower account operator McLaughlin being 
on sick list. Operator O'Connor, third at XN, 
breaking the third day double, causing opera- 
tors Brenneman and Weinmann to double at XN. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, O. V. Kincade, Assistant Chief 
Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



.1. H. Jackson Chairman, Superintendent, Garrett, Ind • 

T.J. RoGEHS Vice-President, Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind- 

T. E. Jamison. Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind- 

John Toruklla Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind- 

G- P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111- 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind- 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind- 

W. F- Moran Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind- 

I). Hahtle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind- 

J. E. Fisher Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind- 

Dr. W. a. Funk Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

Dr. C. W. Heurick Medical Examiner, Willard, O. 

J. D. Jack Claim Agent, Garrett, Ind. 

J. F. MiLBURN Act. Sec'y. Y. M. C. A., Willard, O. 

John Draper Agent. Chicago, 111. 

W. I'. Allman Agent, Avilla, Ind. 

H. C. Haretta Enginet^r 

W. J. WiHKNBAiicH Fireman 

C. B. Maxwell Conductor 

A. C. Smith Brakeman 

S. R. YiNQLiNO Machinist 

W. G. Mehl Machinist 

J. N. Davis Machinist 

C. F. Wessel Car In.spector 

H. J. Blake Air Brake Repairman 

C. D. BEROBTaBSSER Yard Brakeman 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



69 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps, 
Wheelage Clerk 

The manner in which the employes at this 
station responded to the call for the Third 
Liberty Loan was very encouraging. At this 
writing the subscriptions are pouring into the 
cashier's window at a good rate and we hope to 
show a 100 per cent, loyalty record. Supervisor 
Hogan is to be commended on the campaign he 
has made among the track men. All are helping 
to "Halt the Hun" and President Willard's 
statement that the Baltimore and Ohio em- 
ployes have never lacked in patriotism, is 
proven among those at South Chicago. 

On the night of March 19 the employes at 
this station met at Kavanagh's Hall in South 
Chicago to bid good bye to J. M. Shay, general 
foreman of the shops, who has been promoted 
to master mechanic at Cincinnati, and is suc- 
ceeded by J. E. Quigley, who was also extended 
a hearty welcome. W. J. Coombs was master 
of ceremonies and after the singing of "America" 
by the audience, speaking was in order. J. H. 
Davis, machinist, made the opening address, 
stating that the meeting was for the manifesta- 
tion of our esteem of Mr. Shay. Trainmaster 
Huggins dwelt on Mr. Shay's qualities as a man 
and co-worker. Freight agent Altherr in his talk 
said Mr. Shay was always ready to assist in solv- 
ing the problems of railroading and helped to 
make the Baltimore and Ohio wheels go round, 
and the freight agent and his department regret- 
ted to lose him, but would gladly extend their 
support to Mr. Quigley. Frank A. Edwards, 
representing the engineers, said Mr. Shay takes 
with him the best wishes of all the employes. 
Others who spoke were car foreman R. A. 
Kleist, machinist G. Strouse and night foreman 
F. King. Mr. Shay in responding said his 
success at South Chicago was due to the help 
received from the employes, that the engineers in 
particular had given him much encouragement, 
and that his stay here would be remembered 
among the pleasantest of his life. He was 
presented with a platinum stick pin with dia- 
mond setting, gold cuff buttons, and umbrella 
for Mrs. Shay. At the close the audience was 
treated to a few songs, etc., by professionals, 
which were well received. 

With the opening of the Third Liberty Loan 
on April 6, a patriotic meeting was held at 
South Chicago shops. At 9 o'clock the flag 
was raised amid cheers while all the whistles 
and bells in the vicinity of South Chicago were 
put in motion, the Baltimore and Ohio pealing 
out loud and clear above all others. 

(leneral foreman Quigley was in charge of the 
demonstration, all the shop and office emi)loycs 
being present. Thomas H. Berry, veteran 
oi)eratmg engineer, made a very fine opening 
speech, giving the story of the flag in words 
easily understood by our employes at the shops, 
who represent many nationalities. Train- 
master Huggins in his talk urged the men to 
buy bonds and pointed out the value of the 




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$35.00 per page, each insertion and pro rata for halves, quarters 
and eighths, and $2.19 per inch (14 agate lines to an inch, 
one-sixteenth page). Width of column, 16 ems or 2| inches. 
Rates for covers, extra colors and preferred positions will 
be supplied upon request. 

For further particulars address 

FRANK A. O'CONNELL 
Advertising Manager 
Mount Royal Station Baltimore, Maryland 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Liberty Loan as an investment and explained 
the method of purchase, etc. 

Alive is the best word the dictionary can 
offer in defining agent Altherr's attitude in 
regard to the present situation. He is a very 
convincing speaker and made it plain to us that 
the railroads and ships are the things that will 
win the war. He also made a Splendid appeal 
to the foreign-born employes to make the rnost 
of their citizenship as Americans at this time. 
Tne slogan was— ''Buy a Bond." 

Miss Margaret Smurdon, stenographer, has 
received a copy of Trench and Camp, a paper 
printed weekly for the Y. M. C. A. by courtesy 
of Chattanooga Daily Times, Fort Oglethorpe, 
Ga. The paper is very interesting and will 
surely help in the moral uplift of the atmosphere 
of the camp. 

Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, W. E. Buckmaster, Chief Elec- 
trician, Lincoln Street, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. L. Nichols Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster 

CP. Palmer Division Engineer 

R. L. FArrHORN Assistant Engineer 

Alex Cratv Division Claim Agent 

J. A. QxjixN Captain of Police 

C. L. Hegley Examiner and Recorder 

H. McDoxald Supervisor, Chicago Division 

WiLLUM HoGAN Supervisor, Calumet Division 

F. K. Moses Master Mechanic 

F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines 

Charles Esping Master Carpenter 

Dr. E. J. Hughes Medical Examiner 

C. O. SiEEERT Signal Supervisor 

E J. Doyle Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

Edw ard Mattingly General Car Foreman 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

D. M. Julian Car Foreman, Chicago 

Ray Elder Car Foreman, East Chicago 

W. A. Moore Engine Foreman, Blue Island 

L. R. Shearer Engine Foreman, East Chicago 

.I.E. Carta N Engine Foreman, Robey Street 

\Vm. H. Curry Locomotive Engineer, East Chicago 

P. S. Pearson Locomotive Engireer. Blue Island 

.John Latshaw Locomotive Engineer, Robey Street 

(). Norwood Machinist, Robey Street 

W. H. Smallman Machinist, East Chicago 

J. McBride Boilermaker, East Chicago 

Robert Dove Boilermaker, Robey Street 

Report of the Third Liberty Loan shows that 
on April 24 the Baltimore and Ohio Chicago 
Terminal had 1,795 sul)scribers for a total of 
$110,850. This is a percentage of 78. The 
average amount per subscriber now stands at 
$()2.07. 

In coiine(;lion wiili the Liberty Loan cam- 
paign Mie following is higlily worthy of mention. 
Mrs. ('liristina Weber, who is emi)loyed as 
scrubwoman at the (irand Clentral Depot, and 
who has been emi)loyed at the depot for twerity- 
Hcvcni years, bought a $100 bond and paid cash 
for it. She is sixty years of age and has two 
children, one son being in the army. Mrs. 
Weber was bom in Germany, but this is indis- 
putable evidence of her patriotism. 

Miss f'atherine Mullinger, formerly clerk to 
I). M. Julian, car foreman, has resigned to 
acc(;i)t another position. She has been suc- 
ceeded by Mi.ss Helen 'l\ Smith. 



The following Valuation Department em- 
ployes at Chicago, 111., have entered military 
and naval service: 

Edward B. Erickson, chainman, assistant 
paymaster U. S. S. Pocahontas; Arnold Olsen, 
chainman, corporal, Headquarters Detach- 
ment, 67th Field Artillery Brigade, A. E. F.; 
Ralph S. Hillegass, chief of party, sergeant. 
Headquarters Company, 321st Field Artillery, 
Camp Gordon, Ga.; Sylvester J. Burkhard, 
assistant abstracter, 1st Company Infantry, 
3rd Officers' Training Camp, Camp Pike, Ark. ; 
Stanley B. Williams, draftsman, 26th Recruit 
Company, Ordnance Department, Columbus 
Barracks, Ohio; Edward P. Jones, topographer, 
U. S. School of Military Aeronautics, Ohio 
State University, Columbus, Ohio; Thomas 
F. Rodgers, topographer. Ordnance Depart- 
ment, Columbus Barracks, Ohio. 

The bowling season of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Chicago Terminal Athletic Association has 
ended with the following results: 

Won Lost ^^^^ j^^J^^^^ 

Engineers 54 30 . 642 758 

Transportation 51 33 .607 706 

Baltimore and Ohio 

Local 45 39 .533 765 

Lincoln Street 42 42 .500 737 

Maintenance of Way. . 41 43 .488 704 

Car Accountants 37 47 .440 699 

Accoimting 33 51 .392 702 

Valuation 33 51 .392 658 

Team Prizes 

Pin Games High Average High 
Average Won Three Games Game 
Baltimore and 
Ohio Local. . $7 . 00 $15 .00 $6 . 00 2d $2 . 50 

Engineers 6.00 18.00 3.00 1st 5.00 

Lincoln Street. 5.00 14.00 

Transportation 4.50 17.00 

M. of W 4.00 13 .65 

Accounting.. . .3.50 11.00 

Car Acc'tants. 3.00 12.35 

Valuation 2.50 11.00 

Individuals 
High average, three games, H. L. Hines, 195f 
High game for season, H. L. Hines, 237 

Five High Average Men 



Name 


Team 


High 
Game 


Average 


J. T. White. . . 


.Baltimore and 








Ohio Local. . 


214 


161 


H. L. Hines... 


. Engineer 


237 


161 


IL DeHart ... 


.Baltimore and 
Ohio Lo(;al . . 


213 


160 


C. LaFlare. . . . 


.Lincoln Street 


216 


159 


T. A. Hansen. 


..Baltimore and 
Ohio Local. . 


215 


153 



Cvongratulations are benig extended to I. F. 
Barton, roundhouse foreman, whose wife has 
presented him with a little girl. Mother and 
daughter arc doing fine. 

Nearly everyone has some i)articular (and 
peculiar) place where he secretes valuables 
when lrav(nsirjg a lonely stretch all alone 
about 3 a. m. 'Hiose of" the male sex often 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 



utilize their shoes, their trousers, cuffs, inside 
of their vests and the like; while the female of 
the species often uses her — well, you often 
noticed it on a windy day. 

Now, it so happened that H. O. Wertenberg 
(than whom there is no more late stayer-out 
on Wednesday and Sunday nights) felt that he 
should conserve the little of the coin of the 
realm left him, and so placed in his hatband 
a new crisp five-case note. Time, one year ago. 
(Curtain. One year passes.) Time, the pres- 
ent. "Tom" Williams, who always has a lot gf 
things under his hat, chanced to look into 
Wertenberg's chapeau, and, presto! there he 
finds an almost obliterated five dollar bill. He 
gave it to Wertenberg, which proves that 
Williams is an honest man, but what does it 
prove about Wertenberg? We are wondering 
at Williams' interest in Howard's hat. 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Operator, DO 
Office, Chillicothe, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. W. Hoffman Chairman, Superintendent 

R. Mallon Trainmaster 

J. M. Mendell Road Foreman of Engines 

W. F. Hayes Master Mechanic 

A. H Feeygang Division Engineer 

.J. G. Selby Medical Examiner 

E. Cole. Supervisor 

G. E. Whakff Agent, Portsmouth, O. 

T. J. DuNKLE Conductor 

E. W. Foster Brakeman 

C. Deininger Engineer 

C. N. Varian Fireman 

H. M. Cunningham Yard Conductor 

W. F. Ottman Painter Foreman 

G. H. Medert Machinist 

When CIncle Sam called upon the young man- 
hood of America to defend "Old Glory," E. C. 
Henson, who was a telegraph operator on the 
Ohio Division, and now a sergeant in Company 
C, 307th Field Signal Battalion, at Camp Gordon, 





"Look At Him Today!" 

"Six years ago he started in here just as you 
are doing. Now he's General Manager and 
makes more in a day than he used to make in 
a week. The first week he was here he began 
to train for the job ahead by studying in spare 
time with the International Correspondence 
Schools. Inside of six months he got his first 
promotion. You've got the same chance he 
had, young man. Follow his example. Take 
up some I. C. S. course right away. What>'(?tt 
are six years from now is entirely up to you." 

This is the story of thousands of successful men. 
They did their work well, and in spare time, with I. C. S. 
help, trained themselves for advancement. That's 
the thing ior you to do. Whatever your chosen work 
may be, there is an I. C. S. Course that will prepare 
you right at home for abetter position with bigger pay. 

More than 100,000 men are getting ready for pro- 
motion right now in the I. C. S. way. Let us tell 
you what we are doing for them and what we can do 
for you. The way to find out is easy. Just mark 
and mail this coupon. 

mErNriiON AL cTr R eYpI^^ 

BOX 8508, SCRANTON, PA. 

Explain, without obligating me, how I can qualify for the position, 
or in the subject, before which I mark X. 

□ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

□ Electric Lighting and Railways 

□ Electric Wiring 
"Telegraph Engineer 

Telephone Work 
MECHANICAL ENGINEER 



j Mechanical Draftsman 
_] Machine Shop Practice 

□ Gas Engine Operating 

□ CIVIL ENGINEER 

□ Surveying and Mapping 

□ MINE FOREMAN OR ENGINEER 
n Metallurgist or Prospector 

□ STATIONAUY ENGINEER 

□ Marine Engineer 

□ Ship Draftsman 

□ ARCHITECT 

□ Contractor and Builder 

□ Architectural Draftsman 

□ Concrete Builder 

□ Structural Engineer 

□ PLIIMIHNQ AND HEATING 
~ Sheet Metal Worker 

Textile Overseer or Supt. 
CHEMIST 



□ SALESMANSHIP 

□ ADVERTISING 

□ Window Trimmer 

□ Show Card Writer 
Sign Painter 
Railroad Trainman 
ILLUSTRATING 

□ Cartooning 

□ BOOKKEEPER 

_ Stenographer and Typist 

□ Cert. Public Accountant 

□ TRAFFIC MANAGER 

□ Railway Accountant 

□ < 



Commercial Law 
GOOD E 
Teacher 



□ GOOD ENGLISH 

□ ' 

□ Common School Subjects 

□ Mathematics 

□ CIVIL SERVICE 

□ Railway Mail Clerk 

□ automokile operating 

□ Anto Repairing 

□ Navigation | □ Spanbb 

□ agriculture !□ French 

□ Poultry Raising !!□ Italian 



Name 

Present 

Occupation. 

Street 

and No. 



SERGEANT E. C. HENSON 



City. 



Plenffp menhon nvr rnnqazine when writing advertisers 



72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




YARD CREW, CHILLICOTHE. OHIO 
Left to right: H. M. Cunningham, Foreman; H. Francis, Fireman; B. Irwin, Engineer; Cliff H. Womack, 
Switchman; W. R. Roberts, Switchman 



Atlanta, Ga., was not slow to join the colors. 
H-is photograph appears on this page. Judging 
from Henson's appearance the Hun who meets 
him will have a tussle that he has never had 
before. Sergeant Henson is a brother of J. E. 
Henson, agent at Musselman, Ohio. 

Employes on the Ohio Division, have in the 
past few months, doubtless scanned this column 
in the Magazine in vain for some news or items 
of interest and wondered why. Work of this 
kind generally devolves on one man and the 
rest are satisfied to read the items when the 
Magazine arrives, and not consider the time 
and effort required to hunt them up, compile 
them and send them in to the editor. This 
would not be hard to do if the corres- 
pondent has the cooperation of the heads of 
the different departments at the terminals, as 
well as the men employed out on the road. 
With no encouragement or assistance, this soon 
becomes a thankless job and it was under these 
conditions last winter, with the work piling up, 
that the correspondc^nt decided to shift the 
burden on to some willing or tmwilling brother 
and shirk with the rest. However, recently 
thiriffs have been looking up and help ;md co- 
operation have been i)r()miseH. It is the in- 
tention to make tliis column the best in the 
Magazine. You can help l)y sending to the 
correspondent photographs, pictures, sketches 
and items of interest. Will you do it? 

J. W. Brown, general agent for the Baltimore 
and Ohio at Carrp Sherman, has severed his 



connection with this Company and has entered 
the traffic department of the National Cash 
Register Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

C. M. Schriver, trainmaster on the Ports- 
mouth Sub-division, has received a commission 
as lieutenant of railroad engineers for service 
abroad, and is awaiting the call to go east and 
take up his new work. Men are leaving this 
division almost daily to take service under 
Uncle Sam and while we regret to lose them as 
friends and co-workers, we are proud of them 
in their patriotism to their country and wish 
them God-speed and good luck. 

Night engine caller "Boob" Michaels is off 
sick with the mumps. This is tough on 
"Boob," as well as he likes to eat. He might 
be reducing and using this for an excuse. 

Engineer Albert H. Mallow, who has been 
on the sick list since last October, is still unable 
to report for duty. Mallow was injured in a 
collision at Guysville years ago and it was 
thought for a time he would not get well. He 
finally recovered and went back to work after 
being off about two years. His many friends 
sympathize with him in his present trouble and 
hope for his speedy recovery. 

Conductor Charles Noel was taken to the 
City Hospital at Chillicothe and operated on 
for appendicitis, April 10. "Charlie" is still in 
the hospital at this writing, his condition im- 
proving each day. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 



Engineer Earl Brandenburg, who has been 
ill with pneumonia, is improving rapidly and 
will soon be out. 

The new book of rules issued by the Baltimore 
and Ohio has been placed in the hands of the 
employes and examinations on this division 
will begin early in May. It is well to be thor- 
oughly familiar with the rules when called 
upon and this requires a certain amount of close 
study. We can accomplish this in our spare 
time without much inconvenience and make 
the exmaination a pleasure as well as profit to 
ourselves and the examiner. W. W. Wood- 
ward, train dispatcher, and O. C. Gavins, en- 
gineer, have been appointed examiners for the 
Ohio Division. 

In a conversation with our division freight 
agent, Mr. Jones, he commented on the new 
demurrage charge on cars unloading at various 
points on the division. The old demurrage 
charge was SI. 00 per car per day, which was 
increased to $2.00 a day some three years ago. 
The new demurrage charge, which went into 
effect February 10 of this year, has raised the 
price per car to $3.00 the first four days, 
$6.00 per car the next three days and $10.00 
per car each succeeding day after seven days. 
This has the effect of releasing empty cars 
much more promptly all over the System, not 
only for business interests, but for government 
service as well and will be the means of re- 
lieving a great deal of unnecessary congestion 
and delays to emptys and provide another 
channel for speeding up the work of war. 

Mr. Jones also showed how they conserved 
scratch paper at the division freight office. 
By taking the envelopes received in corre- 
spondence, cutting out the backs, pinning the 
different sizes together in pads with paper 
fasteners and using the inside to figure on. 




SERGEANT A. M. PERRY 



PATRICK CLIFFORD 



you have an excellent substitute for scratch 
paper. Thousands of envelopes used in corre- 
spondence are thro\Mi away as useless every 
day. If every agent and freight house em- 
ploye would follow this plan, it would save the 
Gompany many a dollar that goes for soft clip 
and scratcn paper. The division freight office 
does not claim to be the originator of this idea, 
but it's a good plan, so let's try it. 

Above is a photograph of Patrick Clifford, 
who recently was placed on the pension roll of 
honor after serving the Gompany faithfully for 
fifty years. 

A determined looking soldier is Sergeant 
A. M. Perry, Gompany G, 307th Field Signal 
Battalion, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Ga., whose 
picture appears on this page. Sergeant Perry 
was a telegraph operator on the Ohio Division. 
Like Sergeant Henson, of the same division, 
he did not turn a deaf ear to Uncle Sam's call. 
Needless to say, he will give a good account 
of himself when he meets the despised boche. 
Bon voyage, sergeant. 

Just to create a little diversion and excite- 
ment while things were a little dull the other 
day, passenger brakeman Harry Sands rushed 
into the division operator's office and challenged 
Lieutenant Benner, one of the receiving officers 
for the incoming draft, to a foot race and offered 
to bet $5.00 that he would win the race. The 
lieutenant accepted as a matter of pride and 
training after sizing Harry up, and, with the 
writer holding stakes, they repaired to a cinder 
path out in the yards and ran fifty yards with 
much effort — to a deicision in favor of the 
lieutenant, who won by a nose. Harry had 
him worried at that and with a little training, 
would make a first class sprinter. He is look- 
ing for a fast man among the railroad boys to 
put against tne lieutenant and get his money 
buck. Incidentally, Harry has tried to enlist 



74 THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO 

on two different occasions and has been turned 
down on account of his age. He is going to 
New York to try to enlist there. This is true 
patriotism. 

J. B. Simpson, w^ho was employed recently 
in the telegraph department, Ohio Division, 
now working second trick at Leesburg, extra, 
is no stranger from parts unknown, but a former 
employe of the Baltimore and Ohio, working 
betW'een Loveland and Cincinnati on what was 
then called the Cincinnati, Washington and 
Baltimore Railroad. Mr. Simpson's duties at 
that time were strenuous, to say the least, or 
would be at this day and age, as he ran a pas- 
senger local from Loveland to Cincinnati each 
morning, worked as dispatcher-operator during 
the da}'' and captained the train back again at 
night. We welcome Mr. Simpson back to our 
midst. 

The April bulletin issued from the division 
operator's office shows the following positions 
awarded: Martinsville, agent-operator, E. C. 
Harper; Canaanville, third operator, E. L. 
Litter: Frosts, night operator, R. A. Frame; 
Portsmouth, third operator, A. J. Coon; Black 
Fork, agent-operator, D. L. Woodruff. 

The vacation period for t-ie agents and opera- 
tors has arrived and will be provided as rapidly 
as relief men are available, which will not be 
excessive, owing to the demands made upon the 
division operator for men for army service. 
We must have patience and remember that 
these are serious times and not depend too 
mucn on finding ways and means for enjoying 
ourselves on summer vacations at this time. 
Remember that the soldier at the front isn't 
getting a vacation now. He is fighting every 
day, Sundays included. If it becomes neces- 
sary, we can do our bit at home by cultivating 
a war garden during our vacation time or work- 
ing straight ahead and investing the addi- 
tional compensation received in Liberty Bonds. 

The following telegraphers were recently 
employed by division operator Plumly: J. B. 
Simpson, J. Debold and J. W. Stames. 

1'elegraphers called to the colors the past 
month from this district include W. A. liamb, 
Canaanville, and F. Mjtchel, agent, Lyndon. 
This makes a total of nine men from this de- 
|)artnient in the past few months. 

Shop men drafted in April and in training at 
Camp Sherman: C. F. Steel, Elsworth Row- 
land, Otto Orth and Harry Page. Enlisted in 
navy and awaiting call: Oscar W. Sharp, 
Howard A. Wagenman and Albert Scheur. 

The drive on the Ohio Division for sup- 
scriptions for the third Liberty Loan is on, with 
the goal set at $150,(XX). 

At this writing, April 21, after four days' 
soliciting by the various chairmen, the amount 
totals well up over the $3r),(J(X) mark and is 
steadily mounting. In a circular issued from 
the office of superintendent Hoffman he put, 
the situation squarely up to the cn)f)Ioyes of 
being cither a patriotic, red-blooded American 



EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



( 




EAST END NORTH VERNON YARD 



and supporting the government with our time 
and money for a wwld's victory or a slacker, 
and all that the word implies. As the super- 
intendent puts it, ''There are two alternatives 
before us: Buy bonds to win the world for our 
homes and civilization and save money for 
ourselves or let the Kaiser have it." 

Much enthusiasm prevails and the chances 
are good for the Ohio division to go "over the 
top." 

Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



A. A. Iams Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. B. PuRKHiSER Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

H. S. Smith Trainmaster, Se3'mour, Ind. 

C. E. Herth Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

J. M. Shay Master Mechanic, Cincinnati, O. 

S. A. Rogers Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind. 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind. 

P. T. HoRAN General Foreman, Seymour, Ind. 

E. Massman Agent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Sands Agent, Louisville, Ky. 

J. E. O'DoM Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O. 

F. O. BuNTON Secretary, Seymour, Ind. 

RoTATixG Members 

V. L. DowELL Fireman, Seymour, Ind. 

W. F. Clause Conductor, Seymour, Ind. 

Joe Stewart Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

L. D. Harrington Section Foreman, Blocher, Ind. 



T. R. Moore was appointed agent at Dabney, 
Ind., temporarily April 8 by reason of A. E. 
Huntington, who has been in charge of agency 
at Dabney for a number of years, securing 
position as operator at Osgood. 

A very lively interest is being manifested by 
all employes in the Third Liberty Loan issue 
and many subscriptions are being forwarded to 
the treasurer daily from this office. 

We are very sorry to note the absence of 
Harrod Stants from his desk in the division 
accountant's office, made necessary by illness, 
and hope that he will soon be able to again be 
with us. 

A. C. Livensparger, telephone maintainer at 
S(;yinour, is rcicciving congratulations by reason 
of the arrival of a very fine boy at his home. 

C'. E Morton, chief clerk to division engineer, 
has accepted the appointment of representative 
of the Southwest District, Baltimore and Ohio 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Athletic Association, vice C. R. Duncan, chief 
clerk to superintendent, Chijlicothe, Ohio, 
who has been looking after the interest of this 
feature for the past several years. 

P. T. Horan has returned from his old home 
at Cameron, W. Va., where he was completing 
arrangements to move his household effects 
to this point. He hopes to soon be established 
in his own property at Seymour. 

A very enthusiastic assembly of Jackson 
County citizens, including many Baltimore and 
Ohio employes, met a special train operating 
through this section Tuesday, April 16, in the 
interest of the Third Liberty Loan Campaign. 

We have had in our midst for the past several 
days a lieutenant who recently returned from 
the front in France, and it has been noticed that 
one of the young lady stenographers in the 
division office building seems to feel more secure 
when in his company. 

E. J. Olinger, who has been employed in the 
division accountant's office for the past several 
months, has answered the call of his country 
' to the extent that he has resigned his position 
I as general clerk and taken up the occupation 
of tilling the soil. This position is now filled 
by Miss Lenora Carpenter Stanfield. 

L. E. Isenogle, better known as "Izzy," 
motive power accountant in division account- 
ant's office, Seymour, has answered the call of 
his country, and this vacancy has caused the 
promotion of a number of clerks in the division 
accountant's office. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, T. W. Calvin, Transporia'ion 
Department 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. T. Horn Chairrr.an, Supervisor of Transportation 

J. H. Meyers Trainmaster 

J. M. Mendell Ro^d Foreman of Engines 

L. A. CoRDiE Assistant Terminal Agent 

Dr. G. R. Garver Medical Examiner 

J. M. Burke Car Foreman 

H. P. HoGAN General Foreman 

G. A. Bowers.. General Foreman 

T. Mahoney • Supervisor 

Rotating Members 
E. R. HoTTEL Machinist 

H. W. KiRBERT Engineer 

C. R. DooLiTTLE Yardmaster 

G. Hurdle Inbound Foreman 

R. H. Searls Claim Clerk 



Illinois Division 

Correspondents 

Walter S. Hopkins, Chief Clerk to Division 

Accountant, Flora, 111. 
Omer T. Goff, Secretary to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. G. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent 

Omer T. Goff Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

J. W. Odum Trainmaster 

R. E. Chamberlain Division Engineer 

W. F. Harris Master Mechanic 

C. H. Creager Road Foreman 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator 

H. Oki£ Master Carpenter 




A Real Mans 
WristWaich 



npHE day of the wrist watch h 

^ here! A wrist watch is part of ever 



IS 

part of every 
officer's equipment in the ^ European 
arniies. Practically every officer in the U. S. 
army wears one. Jt has bcc.i proven the viost 
convenient watch in the icorld. 

And here is the Aviator's model. This 
New Burlington v/as built for aviators and is 
adjusted to keep time to the second anywhere. 
Fully jeweled— finest n'ckel movement. Square design. 
Clear, distinct, military dial. Extra heavy hands. 
Buckles with sturdy pip: s Idn strap that cannot slip. Send 
coupon today for beautiiully illustrated catalog. 

Rndiiim HinJ ' We furnish this watch 

I\aaiUm Uiai. ^j^h racium di: 1 when de- 
sired using only the highest grade radium. The same as 
is used on the very best scientific instruments. We knew 
positively that thisquality of radium willnot lose its lumi- 
nosity for many years, in fact we believo it will last a life- 
time. Although we can't claim this definitely as radium 
has been discovered only a comparatively shorj; time. 

The Burlington 

$252a Month 



Yes,— all of this for $2.50— only $2.50 
a month for this masterpiece of watch manufacture. 
Now Fold direct to you at positively the exact price 
that the wholesale dealer would have to pay. 

Write for FREE Book showing the lafe<^ 
designs in our New Regular Model Watch. 

Send the Coupon y « — 
for Watch Book B«riington watch 

^ Company 

/ 
/ 
/ 



Get the Burlington Watch Book 
bv sending this coupon now. 
You will know a lot more about 
watch bayinu when you read it. 
Y >u will know why a man who haa 
come accustomed to the cop.- 
?nience of a wrist watth 
would never eo without oi.e ^ free book on watches with full 
Send the coupon to- ^ explanation of your cash or 



19th and Marshall Blvd. 
Dept. 7135 Chicago, Illinois- 

Please send me (without 
obligatiors and prepaid) your 



for book and our spec- 



ial offer. Mail it now 

BurLngfon Wa'-l' f cmpany 

"Dept. 7435 
19th and Marsnall 

Boulevard, 
Chicago, Illinois 



$2.50 a month offer on the Bur- 
lii.g^on V. atch. 



Please went ion our nmqnzine irhen ivriling adver Users 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



76 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor 

M. F. Wyatt Supervisor 

G. H. SiNGKR Agent, East St. Louis 

C. S. Mitchell Agent, Flora, III. 

KoT.\TiNO Members 

W. H. Mullen Engineer 

Paul Naney Fireman 

CO. Davis Conductor 

J. E. BuRRis Brakeman 

H. C. Smith Machinist 

George Quayle Machine Man 

Frank O'Shatz Car Inspector 

Ed Widdows .'.Track Foreman 

With the departure of the next contingent of 
drafted men from Flora, 111., there will be added 
to the service flag hanging in the division 
accountant's office, two more stars, which will 
represent the affiliation of two more clerks with 
Uncle Sam. It is with great regret that we 
must lose the companionship of Howard L. 
Vermilion, who for the past several years has 
been connected with the C. T. timekeeping de- 
partment, and Warren E. Smith, maintenance 
of way material clerk. By the departure of 
these two young men Mr. Groscup will lose two 
of his most proficient clerks, as their experience 
in their particular line of work both before and 
after the establishing of the division accounting 
organization made them valuable men. 

While I say it is witli regret that we must 
lose these two young men, still we are certainly 
very proud that we have men who are capable 
of representing us on the western front and it is 
with considerable pride also that we add to our 
service flag two more stars and can say that we 
have made a sacrifice towards the great cause 
now before the world. 

The regular meeting of the Division Safety 
Committee was held at Flora, Tuesday, April 
16. Superintendent Stevens at this meeting 
impressed on all present the importance of 




HOWARD L. VERMITJON 




WARREN E. SMITH 



purchasing Liberty Bonds of the third issue. 
Other matters of importance were discussed. 
The meeting was well attended and much 
interest manifested. 

J, K. Waite, former assistant supervisor at 
Vincennes, has been promoted to the position 
of chief bridge inspector, with headquarters at 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Considerable enthusiasm has been manifested 
on the Illinois Division regarding the sale of the 
Third Liberty Loan Bonds. The superin- 
tendent's chief clerk, Mr. Conley, in order to 
assist in the sale of bonds, also to stir the en- 
thusiasm to a higher pitch, auctioned off several 
bonds, the first one, a fifty dollar bond, going to 
C. D. Russell, assistant chief dispatcher. The 
second, a one hundred dollar bond, was won by 
C. K. Beaver, machinist. The bonds were sold 
so easily that it soon became a popular pastime 
as well as beneficial to the country in the sale of 
the third issue. Mr. Conley was also a winner, 
he having drawn the bond auctioned by Mr. 
Russell. We feel quite sure that the Illinois 
Division will rank well towards the top in the 
sale of the Third Liberty Loan. 

P. H. Groscup, division accountant, was 
called to Baltimore by the sudden death of 
his father. 

The base})all movement is again on foot and 
whih; several of the former stars have been 
called to the front, they are being succeeded 
by some of the okler players, who were at their 
best in the early days. However, in conversa- 
tion with the "old heads" they seem positive 
that they can come l)ack and will show the 
youngsters that they can still swing the stick 
imd shoot them to first as they did some years 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



ago. No definite line-up has been made but 
the spirit is there and we have hopes of having 
the winning team. 

E. E. Marshall, stores clerk in the division 
accountant's office, has ambitions to be a 
chaplain and is spending his leisure time in 
study. Mr. Marshall feels that while he has 
passed that stage wherein he might have been 
a good fighter, he can still do his bit by walking 
up and down the trenches encouraging the boys 
to greater d^ds. 

The usuafemonthly meeting of the Freight 
Claim Prev.^Ettion Committee was held in the 
committee=:i^om of the Merchants' Exchange 
Building, Louis, Mo., March 12. The 

meeting was^falled tO order by chairman Singer, 
after whicfe-lfiQany things interesting to this 
movement was discussed. 

Some talk of a tennis club being organized. 
"Tom" McCarthy suggested it and is enthused 
over the matter. We have no doubt but what 
if somebody will organize the club, have the 
grounds properly prepared, put Mac's name on 
the list as a member of the club and come for 
him in a machine, that he would consent to 
take part in the festivities. 

The accompanying photograph is that of 
former brakeman and extra conductor Walter 
H. Platz, who was called to the colors in the 
draft of last September. Mr. Platz has for 
some time been located at Camp Shelby, Miss., 
303rd Field Bakery Company, and from the 
letters received he is enjoying army life, having 
gained sixteen pounds. 




WALTER H. PLATZ 



77 

Toledo Division 

Correspondent, I. E. Clayton, DwiHumOperalor, 
Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent 

H. W. Brant Trainmaster 

F. J. Parrish Division Enirineer 

L E. Clayton Division Operator 

F. McKiLLiPS Yard Conductor 

F. Irey Road Engineer 

M. DiBLiNG Machinist 

H. T. Heilman Secretary to Superintendent 

Dr. F. H. Hutchinson Medical Examiner, Lima, O. 

Dr. R. C. Potter Medical Examiner, East Dayton, O 



Sandy Valley & Elkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, L. E. Gatewood, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. R. Laughlin Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenship Section Foreman 

S. H. Johnson Engineer 

E. E. Cassidy Fireman 

J. M. MooRE Conductor 

George Dixon, former chief clerk to superin- 
tendent, has been promoted to position of train- 
master, Sandy Valley & Elkhorn and Long Fork 
Railways. He is succeeded by L. E. Gatewood, 
who was transferred from accounting depart- 
ment of the Ohio Division at Chillicothe, Ohio. 

The Long Fork Division was officially opened 
as of March L This new addition to the 
Baltimore and Ohio System branches off the 
Elkhorn & Beaver Valley Branch of the Chesa- 
peake & Ohio at Martin, Ky., and extends 
twenty-three miles through the famous Elk- 
horn coal field to Weeksbury, Ky., which is 
the end of the line. 

George Dixon, trainmaster, was recently 
discharged from the hospital, where he was 
confined six weeks with typhoid fever. 



In Flanders Fields. 

(Written during the Second Battle of Ypres, April, 1S15, 
by Lieutenant Colonel Dr. John McCrae of Montreal, 
Canada.) 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow 
Between the crosses, row by row. 
That mark our place, and in the sky 
The larks, still bravely singing, fly. 
Scarce heard amid the guns below. 

We are the dead. Short days ago 
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, 
Loved and were loved, and now we lie 
In Flanders fields. 
Take up our quarrel with the foe. 

To you from falling hands we throw 
The torch; be yours to hold it high. 
If ye break faith with us who die 

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow 
In Flanders fields. 




THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



OX¥tAILJU>AD 



OUR REGULAR RAILWAY DISCOUNT 

are making the same discount to Telegraph 
Operators, and to other Railway Employes, that we 
are offering to the various RAILWAY SYSTEMS— 
25% discount — with the additional concession of 
allowing payment to be made monthly if not 
convenient to pay all cash. 

The price of the Fox Typewriter, with regular equip- 
ment, is $100.00, but our Railway Discount of 25% 
reduces this to $75.00. 
Send any amount you can spare, from $5.00 up, as a first 
payment, and pay $5.00 monthly. 5% discount for all cash. 
$10.00, or more, is sent with order we will include free 
a very fine metal case, in addition to the rubber cover, together 
class brass padlock for locking case when typewriter is not in use. 



If 



with a high- 



WHAT WE CLAIM FOR THE FOX 

The FOX Typewriter has every feature found in any 
Standard Typewriter ever advertised in the Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine and a number of exclusive features of its own 



The ordinary typewriter will not meet the requirements of the telegraph operator. 

Our New Fox Telegraphers' Model is a revelation in completeness, durability, ease of operation 
and special automatic features. It is fully Visible, has the lightest touch and easiest action 
of any typewriter in the world, makes almost no noise and is built to give a lifetime of service 
and satisfaction. 

The Famous Fox Telegraphers' Keyboard has 44 keys, writing 88 characters, with a 
standard arrangement of the regular letters, numerals, punctuation, etc., but with a number 
of additional characters, absolutely necessary in the work of the telegrapher, and not obtain- 
able on other typewriters. 

These typewriters are strictly new stock, up-to-the-minute in every detail, complete with 
telegraphers' keyboard, any size or style of type, shift or shiftless, rubber covers, two-color 
rih)bons and are guaranteed for three years from date of purchase* 

Please order direct from this offer, mentioning the Baltimore and Ohio Employes Magazine, and inclose any 
amount of cash you can spare. Shipment of typewriters will be made same day order is received. 




IHeasr, menlion our magazine when writing advertisers 



Baltimore ^Ohio 

Empic^es Magazine 



Iff 




THE FOOD SITUATION 

[No. 4 OF A SERIES] 



/^UT down on candy and sweet drinks. 

Eat half as much sweets as before and 
you are still eating more than the English- 
man or Frenchman gets and needs. 

Use honey, maple sirup, corn sirup or 
molasses on the breakfast table instead of 
sugar. 



Serve cake without frosting or icing. 
Eat plenty of fruit. 

We will make every endeavor to see that 
the country is provided with a supply of 
household sugar on a basis of three pounds 
of sugar for each person per month. Do 
not consume more. 



THE UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION asks you to get 
behind our soldiers, sailors and associates by sending them now the most 
food possible in the least shipping space. Every man, woman and child 
in America can help by eating less wheat, beef, pork, fats and sugar, more 
of other plentiful foods which cannot be shipped, and by avoiding waste. 



EAT PLENTY, WISELY, WITHOUT WASTE. 
AND HELP WIN THE WAR 



Reprint from material furnished by the 

UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 



B ■ 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



lipi'llill 
liiiJl 




Get Ready for 

"Old-Timers^ Shoots" 

Trapshooting has its "old-Hmers" — veterans 
of the game for fifteen or more years. By at- 
tending shoots, serving as officials, increasing 
the membership, instrutting new members, promoting 
club events and otherwise serving the club, they've been 
the "old reliables" whose loyalty rightly deserves recog- 
nition by fellow-members and sportsmen everywhere. 

Show these "old-timers" you are appreciative of their 
work to make trapshooting the "sport alluring." 

At the Gun Clubs 

members and officials will give you a royal welcome. 
You can take part in "Old-Timers' Shoots" and be eligible 
for the trophies provided for the participants in this 
national event in honor of trapshooting's worthy veterans. 

Club officials should make arrangements now to con- 
duct an "Old-Timers' Shoot" in May or June. Write 
to Sporting Powder Division for complete information. 
Use the coupon. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

Wilmington, Delaware. 

NOTE— When in Atlantic City, visit the Du Pont 
Products Store, Boardwalk and Penn. Avenue, and 
Trapshooting School on Ocean End of Young's 
Million Dollar Pier. 



The Du Pont American Industries Are: 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del., Explosives. 
Du Pont Chemical Works, New York, Pyroxylin and Coal Tar 
Chemicals. 

Du Pont Fabrikoid Co., Wilmington, Del., Leather Substitutes. 
The Arlington Works, 725 Broadway. New York, Ivory Py-ra-lin and 

Cleanable Collars. 
Harrison Works, Philadelphia, Pa., Paints, Pigments, Acids, Chemicals. 
Du Pont Dye Works, Wilmineton, Del., Dyes and Dye Bases. 




MAIL THIS COUPON 

Marking X Before Subject 
of Interest and Send Address 
to Adv. Div., Du Pont Co., 
Wilmington, Delaware. 



□ "Old-Timers' Shoot" 

□ Sporting Powders 

□ Trapshooting 

□ Explosives 

□ Blasting Supplies 

□ Harrison Paints 

□ Auto Finishes 

□ Vitrolac Varnish 

Q Bridgeport Wood Finish 

□ FABRIKOID 

□ PY-RA-LIN 

□ Commercial Acids 

□ Metal Preservatives 

□ Bronze Powders 

(Baltimore & Ohio Employes Magazine) 




lllll'llll 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



2 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



B ■ niiinniitic nn n H □ im h □ h o u ui a n □nil □ u n o i) □ a no i) u □ ci c ci lu a oi n k ■ B 
■ ■ iiiiiiiiiimc « no u a a no o u o o o u o t) o n ci u u o n } u ii i] h u ci h o m h « uin a : ■ ■ 

Some of the Properties Owned by the Savings Feature 
of the Relief Department 

Which May be Purchased on the Monthly Rental Plan 



WESTON, W. VA. 

(About Half Mile From Town) 
1 story and attic frame dwelling, 7 rooms 
and pantry, slate and metal roof, stone 
foundation, lighted by gas. Lot 60 x 235 x 
413.5 X 424 feet. Price $2800.00. 1-10 cash, 
balance in monthly instalments. 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

( SUBURBAN ) 

3306 GRACE AVENUE 
(About 2 blocks west of Reisterstown Road) 

6 rooms, bath, electric lights, furnace 
heat, city water. Lot 25 x 115 feet; ground 
rent $60.00. Taxes $23.25. Price $1200.00. 





GARRETT, INDIANA 

411 SOUTH PETER STREET 
Lot 30 feet by 125 feet. l|-story frame 
dwelling, stone and brick foundation, 9 
rooms, city water; also barn. Price $1700.00. 
1-10 cash, balance in monthly instalments. 




McMECHEN, W. VA. 

SIXTH (OR GRANT) STREET 
Lot 1 and part of lot 2, J. A. Miller's 
addition, 40 feet 8 inches by 42 feet. 2-8tory 
frame dwelling, 8 rooms, brick foundation, 
city water, lighted by gas. Price $2500.00. 
1-10 cash, balance in monthly instalments. 



Please mention our ituigazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



3 




ST. JOE, INDIANA 



MAIN STREET 

19 rooms, shingle roof, brick foundation. 
1 out building 10 feet by 12 feet. Lot 100 
feet by 150 feet. Price $1600.00. Suitable 
for hotel or large boarding house. 



FLORA, ILLINOIS 



AUSTIN STREET 

4 rooms, city water and sewer, shingle 
roof, concrete foundation. Lot 74 feet by 
208 feet. Price $1000.00. 





GARRETT, INDIANA 



SOUTH PETER STREET 

8ro3ms, gas and electric lights, city water 
and sewer, shingle roof, brick foundation. 
Lot 50 feet by 125 feet. Price $1450.00. 



MIDLAND CITY, OHIO 



6 rooms and out building, shingle roof, 
stone and brick foundation. Lot of about 
one-third of an acre. Price $600.00. 




Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



FACTS ABOUT THE WAR 

IMPORTANT WAR INFORMATION BOOKLETS 
ISSUED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

YOUR government desires that everybody be given an opportunity to 
learn all facts about the War. Every American should know WHY 
we entered this war. Every American should know WHY we must 
fight on until the high ideals of Americanism and Democracy are attained. 

President Wilson created the Committee on Public Information to tell the 
people the TRUTH. As a part of its work this Committee has prepared 
a series of thirty -seven booklets, each dealing with a vital war problem- 
These booklets will be furnished free upon request. Fill in coupon below. 



Booklet 
No. 5 



Booklet 
No. 6 



Booklet 
No. 115 



CONQUEST AND KULTUR. Contents: Hundreds of quotations from 
the writings of leading German statesmen, professors and publicists, 
revealing the Prussian idea of world conquest. One section is devoted to 
Germany's designs upon the United States with special reference to the 
Monroe Doctrine. 160 pages with comprehensive map. 
GERMAN WAR PRACTICES. Prussianism in all its horror. Methods 
of the German Military Machine. Documentary proofs of German 
official brutalities upon civilians. Narrating instances of frightfulness 
taken directly from German sources. 

WHY AMERICA FIGHTS GERMANY. A statement why America 
entered the war. Deals with offences of Germany against America and 
against the world. The case in a nutshell written in plain language. 



The above mentioned are but three of a series of thirty-seven authentic war 
publications. Fill in coupon below and these three booklets will be sent you 
together with a complete catalogue from which you may select other booklets. 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION 

The Secretary of State The Secretary of the Navy 

The Secretary of War George Creel 

8 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. 



FACTS ABOUT THE WAR COUPON 

Fill in and mail, under first class postage (3c) to 
Department of Distribution, 

Committee on Public Information, 

8 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. (Date) 

Please send me. free of any charge, the booklets which I have checked, to 
the address given below. 

□ Conquest £?• Kultur □ German War Practices □ Why A merica Fights Germany 

My name is 

Street address 

City 

Baltimore and Ohio Employe* MagaziDc, Juiir July, 1918 



[This space is 
patriotically 
donated to our 
government by the 
publishers of the 
Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Maga- 
zine in apprecia- 
tion of the value 
of having every 
American read 
these important 
war booklets - - 



Pleme menlion our magazine when writing adverliners 



BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Volume 6 BALTIMORE, JUNE-JULY, 1918 Numbers 2 and 3 



CONTENTS 



Arthur W. Thompson and Charles W. Galloway are made Federal 

Managers for Baltimore and Ohio Lines 7 

President Willard's Message on Federal Control 10 

American Big Guns By an Ordnance Officer 11 

Wins Praise of Newton D. Baker 14 

The American Red Cross— What It Is and What It Does., 16 

J. C. McCahan, Jr., Manager of Mail and Express Traffic, Serving 

on Important Committees 21 

Mt. Clare Bowlers are Awarded Trophies for 1917-1918 Season 23 

From the Boys "Over There" ." 24 

Physical Fitness : Dr. E. M. Parlett 26 

Fire Prevention Bulletin 28 

Going Over the Falls in a Barrel '. 29 

Echoes of the Third Liberty Loan Drive on The Baltimore and Ohio 30 

Belgians Employed at Timber Preservation Plant are Doing Their 

Bit for Native Land and Uncle Sam 35 

Employes in Baltimore Give Liberally to Second Red Cross War Fund. . . 36 

A Big Man Who Does Big Things W. E. Buckmaster 37 

Baseball Trophies for 1918 Season 38 

Each Divisional Baseball Team a Nucleus for an Employes' Club 39 

Editorial 40 

Outfitting an Army with Thrift Stamps 41 

Statement of Pension Feature 42 

Woman's Department 43 

Safety First Roll of Honor 47 

Among Ourselves 51 

Our Sweetheart — Poem Minna Irving 79 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write on one side of the sheet only. 



\ 



Arthur W. Thompson and Charles W. 
Galloway are Made Federal Managers 
For Baltimore and Ohio Lines 



HE selection of two Baltimore and 
Ohio men — Arthur W. Thomp- 
son and Charles W. Galloway — 
by the United States Railroad 
Administration as Federal Managers of 
lines east and west, respectively, is a 
source of gratification to officials and em- 
ployes of the Company and has caused 
much favorable comment by the press of 
the country. 

Mr. Thompson is Federal Manager of 
the Baltimore and Ohio in the Allegheny 
District, his jurisdiction extending over 
the lines east. He assumed his new 
duties on June 1. A further honor was 
given him on June 11 when the Western 
Maryland Railway and Cumberland Val- 
ley Railroad were placed under his direc- 
tion. Mr. Galloway's jurisdiction covers 
the western lines of the Baltimore and 
Ohio and also the Dayton and Union 
Railroad. 



Before taking up their duties with the 
United States Railroad Administration, 
Mr. Thompson and Mr. Galloway re- 
signed as officers of the Baltimore and 
Ohio. Mr. Thompson gave up the posi- 
tion of vice-president in charge of the 
traffic, operating and engineering de- 
partments of the Baltimore and Ohio 
System and Mr. Galloway resigned from 
the office of vice-president of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Southwestern and gen- 
eral manager of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Lines West. 

Both Federal Managers have been 
associated with the Company for many 
years. They are thoroughly familiar 
with the work to which they have been 
assigned and this, together with the 
esteem in which they are held by the 
rank and file of Baltimore and Ohio men, 
assures a continuance of the state of high 
efficiency which prevails along our lines. 




Arthur W. Thompson 



HRTHUR W. THOMPSON'S ca- 
reer as a railroad man is one that 
should serve as an inspiring lesson 
to any young man. His rapid 
rise to success is due to his ambition and 
willingness, to work. He applied himself 
with energy to the duties of every position 
he held, and as a result one promotion 
followed closely upon the heels of the 
last. 

Mr. Thompson was born on May 8, 
1875, at Erie, Pa. He is the son of 
Sheldon and Lavern B. (Webster) 
Thompson, both of whom come of old 
American stock. His father's and 
mother's people came from Massachu- 



setts and his mother from Kentucky. 
After a sound public school education 
he entered Allegheny College at Mead- 
ville. Pa., and was graduated from that 
institution in 1897 with the degree of 
civil engineer. He spent his vacation 
prior to the year he left college with the 
P. B. & L. E. R. R. as rodman on loca- 
tion. With the exception of a brief 
period during which he worked for a 
private concern — immediately after re- 
ceiving his degree — he has been in rail- 
road service. 

In 1898 he became associated with the 
Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad as 
instrumentman. The following year he 



7 




CHARLES W. GALLOWAY 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 



entered the Baltimore and Ohio service 
and was placed in charge of parties on 
surveys, etc., in which capacity he served 
until July, 1900. 

From that time to September, 1901, 
he was assistant division engineer of the 
Pittsburgh Division. In 1901 he was 
made division engineer at Cumberland 
and the following year returned to Pitts- 
burgh in a similar capacity. In 1903 he 
was appointed superintendent of the 
Cumberland Division and remained in 
this position until 1904, when he was 
transferred to Wheeling, W. Va., to 
supervise that division. Three years 
later he was made chief engineer, main- 
tenance of way, and in 1910 was ap- 
pointed chief engineer of the Baltimore 
and Ohio System. He was general man- 
ager from 1910 to 1912 and in the latter 
year was made third vice-president. 
Afterward he served as third vice-presi- 
dent of the Baltimore and Ohio, C. H. 



& D. and Staten Island Lines. On 
July 1, 1916, he was appointed vice- 
president in charge of traffic and com- 
mercial development and on December 
1 of the following year . was made 
chairman of general operating com- 
mittee, Eastern Railroads, with head- 
quarters at Pittsburgh. A month later 
he was made vice-president in charge of 
traffic, operating and engineering de- 
partments, and remained in this position 
until his recent appointment as Federal 
Manager. 

Mr. Thompson is a member of the 
following bodies: Acting President of 
American Railway Association, American 
Society Civil Engineers, American Rail- 
way Engineering Association, Engineers^ 
Society Western Pennsylvania, and 
American Academy of Political and 
Social Science. He is also president of 
the board of trustees of Allegheny Col- 
lege, Meadville, Pa. 



Charles W. Galloway 



[ ^ 1HARLES W. GALLOWAY is a 
[ railroad man of broad and varied 

1^^^ experience, having started as a 
gQ^Qj.Q\ utility boy in a tele- 
graph office and by his assiduity won 
promotion after promotion until he 
was appointed to the position which he 
held prior to his being called by the 
government. He is one of the most 
popular officials on the Baltimore and 
Ohio. 

Mr. Galloway was -born on December 
11, 1868, in Baltimore, and entered the 
service of the Baltimore and Ohio in 
1883. The family of which he is a mem- 
ber has been connected with the Com- 
pany from its earliest days. Back in the 
''twenties" of the last century, shortl}^ 
after Charles Carroll of Carrollton laid 
the cornerstone of the first American 
railroad, William Galloway, Sr., grand- 
father of Charles W. Galloway, entered 
the employ of the road. 

The annals of American railroading 
give the Galloway family its first promi- 



nence in recording the memorable race 
between the first locomotive built in this 
country and a horse — William Galloway, 
the elder, having driven the horse in this 
historic test of endurance. Later Mr. 
Galloway became an engineer, which posi- 
tion he filled for fifty years. 

The next in line was his son, Charles 
B. Galloway — father of the Federal 
Manager — who, like his ancestor, was a 
locomotive engineer. 

Between 1870 and 1880, when the 
''cannonball" express trains made sched- 
ules of forty miles an hour to the awe 
of the traveling public, Charles B. Gal- 
loway sat at the throttle of his road's 
limited trains. He worked in this ca- 
pacity until his death, which occurred 
in an accident while on duty. 

It was then that Charles . W. Galloway 
entered Baltimore and Ohio service at 
the age of fifteen years. He started 
as an office boy — a telegraph messenger — 
in the general offices at Baltimore. 
While serving in this capacity he mas- 



10 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



tered the problem of manipulating the 
telegraph key. He then applied himself 
to the study of stenography until he was 
qualified to take the position of secretary 
and began writing for the master of 
transportation, the superintendent of car 
service, the superintendent of transporta- 
tion and the general superintendent. 
This was back in the ' 'nineties." 

On September 23, 1897, he was pro- 
moted to his first official position, when 
he was made trainmaster of the Bal- 
timore Division. He was advanced to 
assistant superintendent on July 1, 1899. 
On November 1, 1901, he was promoted 
to superintendent of the Cumberland 
Division. His record at Cumberland 
was a notable one and he was advanced 



to the superintendency of the Balti- 
more Division on April 21, 1903. 

The next step forward in railroad 
service was to the office of superinten- 
dent of transportation, then to general 
superintendent of transportation of the 
Baltimore and Ohio lines, , embracing 
the Baltimore and Ohio Southwestern 
district. In September, 1910, he was 
transferred to Cincinnati as general 
superintendent of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Southwestern lines and filled that 
office until April 11, 1912, when he was 
promoted to general manager of the 
Baltimore and Ohio, with headquarters 
at Baltimore. Mr. Galloway was later 
promoted to the position he held until his 
recent appointment as Federal Manager 



u 



1/ 



President Willard^s Message on 
Federal Control 



Baltimore, Md., June 17, 1918. 

To All Officers and Employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Company: 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company having relinquished the 
control and operation of its property during the period of Govern- 
ment possession and control, I wish, as President of the Company, 
to thank all officers and employes for their loyal and efficient service in 
the past, and to urge that the same support be given to those who may 
be placed in charge of the property while it remains under Federal control. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, because of its location, is a very 
important transportfcition agency, and I hope that every officer and em- 
ploye in its service will continue as in the past to do everything possible 
to make it an efficient agency of the Government in this great crisis. 
There is nothing so important at the present time as the winning of the 
war, and we should all be willing to make any sacrifice and every effort 
that may be necessary in order to accomplish that end. 



W 

^■4 



American Big Guns 



By An Ordi 

NAPOLEON started on his career 
as an artillerist in a time when it 
was thought that every decisive 
military engagement must be de- 
cided by the bayonet. He said that the 
most important element in the success of 
any military operation was the strength 
and support of its artillery 

In looking over his marvelous military 
career, the student finds that the domi- 
nating factor in his success was the su- 
periority of his artillery and the excel- 
lence of the French artillerist. The 
Germans in their preparations for this 
war followed in his footsteps. Their 
marvelous heavy ordnance is one of the 
greatest surprises of the present struggle. 

Today the two dominating factors in 
the struggle for world supremacy are 
still the bayonet and heavy artillery. 
Without the support of either success 
is impossible. 

Big guns play a major part in decid- 
ing battles, now as in the day of Napo- 
leon. For this reason it is interesting 
to know something about the different 
kinds of big gun being made for our army 
in France. 

Artillery may be divided into two 
classes — mobile artillery, which includes 



ince Officer 

all guns used m the field, and seacoast 
artillery, which is used in fortifications 
on fixed mounts. 

It is the mobile artillery which we 
are vitally interested in at the present 
time for offensive work on the French 
front. This mobile artillery is divided 
into three distinct types — guns, howitz- 
ers, and mortars. 

Guns 

The first of thsee are long-range rifles 
distinguished by high muzzle velocity 
and long barrels of from 30 to 50 cali- 
bers; that is to say, the length of bar- 
rel ranges from thirty to fifty times 
the diameter of the bore, giving a range 
of from 6,000 to 30,000 yards with a 
low angle of fire. 

These guns are classified as wheel 
mounts, antiaircraft (truck mounts), 
emplacement • mounts, and railway 
mounts. The wheel mounts are sub- 
divided as pack artillery (mountain 
guns transported on pack mules); field 
guns, drawn by horse teams and at- 
tached to rumbles; motorized field guns, 
drawn by big ammunition trucks; trac- 
tor-drawn guns of large caliber; and the 
so-called horse artillery, drawn hy horses. 



11 



12 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



with all cannoneers mounted, for fast 
field work in support of cavalry. 

The wheel-mount guns include the 
famous French 75 (3-inch) and the 
4.7-inch guns, which have created such 
havoc among- their German opponents 
and which have been responsible for 
breaking down the greatest military 
offensives of the Germans in the past 
three years. The 4.7 are of greater 
range and caliber but of practically 
the same type as the 75 mm. 

Next in order, according to size, 
come the 5-inch and the 6-inch seacoast 
guns, such as our allies have with- 
drawn from the fortifications and 
mounted on improvised wheel mounts, 
for use as mobile artillery. 

Thcj second class are the antiaircraft 
guns, for which purpose 75s and 4.7s 
are provided, mounted on a carriage 
which will allow an elevation of about 
85° and a traverse of 360°, set up on a 
motor truck. 

Emplacement mounts are large-cali- 
ber guns that are partially mobile. 
They are taken apart and moved around 
in sections in tractors as needed, and 
set up in concrete emplacements. They 
are, more strictly speaking, siege guns. 

The railway-mount guns are con- 
verted seacoast and naval long-range 
rifles of from 8 to 14 inches caliber. 
They have a mount consisting of a 
specially designed carriage on a railway 
car and they are operated, due to their 
extreme range and accuracy, far back 
from the front lines over the heads of our 
own troops. 

Howitzers 

The howitzer is distinguished from 
the rifle by a low muzzle velocity, 
ranging from 1,200 to 1,900 feet per 
second, and a short barrel, approxi- 
mately eighteen times the caliber of 
the gun, developing a range at high 
auKle' fire of from 10,000 to 23,000 
yards. 

The commonest siz(;s of howitzers in 
use are the 155-mm., the 8-inch, the 
240-mm., and, of course, the famous 
16-inch howitzer which we heard so 
nmch about in the early days of the 
war, when the Germans, who first used 
them, created such dreadful havoc, de- 



stroying with them the fortifications 
of Liege. 

The smaller sizes, such as the 155- 
mm. and the 8-inch, are used prin- 
cipally for field work, but also for the 
bombardment of permanent fortifica- 
tions when necessary. 

Howitzers have the advantage of be- 
ing cheaper to make than guns, and 
use cheaper ammunition. Also the life 
of the gun is longer. Indicative of this 
the life of a howitzer 'of the same cali- 
ber as a gun would be about two-thirds 
longer. But they are not as accurate 
and have not as long range as the guns 
and consequently are not adapted for 
all work. 

The life of the guns ranges from 8,000 
rounds for the small field type down to 
600 or 700 for the converted seacoast guns. 

These figures denote only the actual 
accuracy life. It is probable that the 
guns will be fired up to fifty per cent, 
above these figures before retiring them. 
By refining the barrels the life of the gun 
is practically renewed. 

Mortars 

Mortars are distinguished by even 
lower muzzle velocity, from about 480 
to 2,000 feet per second, and by a 
length of barrel of about ten calibers, 
w^th a range of from 2,500 to 15,000 
yards. This extreme range is obtained 
by a very high angle of elevation. The 
common French type is the 240-mm. 
mounted on a railway carriage. 

This practically covers the principal 
guns which are used by our allies to- 
day and with which our troops will be 
equipped in France. The 3-inch and 
4.7-inch guns, U. S. Army Model of 
1906, are practically the same in gen- 
eral principle as the French 75 and 
155, which are of the corresponding 
caliber. But it must be remembered 
that our allies have had three years 
actual experience with which to per- 
fect many of the minute details which 
are so important in the effectiveness 
of the field gun and which are only dis- 
covered under actual field conditions 
of long duration. This has led to 
great improvements over the guns origi- 
nally in use. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



13 



As indicative of the tremendous amount 
of material that one reg'iment of 75s 
comprises, it is interesting to know 
that there are approximately 300 ve- 
hicles, exclusive of the actual fighting 
material, to each regiment. These ve- 
hicles are trailers, tractors, and trucks, 
and artillery repair trucks and supply 
trucks. In the actual fighting mate- 
rial there are 24 guns, 36 caissons, 
60 limbers, and the reel carts for the 
field telephone, making a grand total of 
approximately 430 vehicles to a regiment. 

The estimated cost of the motoriza- 
tion of the artillery alone of the United 
States Army is $500,000,000, of which 
approximately $210,000,000 had been 
expended on the 1st of February. Am- 
munition trucks and vehicles are being 
completed faster than they can be 
shipped. Up to the present time the 
sum of $776,000,000 has been expended 
by the Procurement Division of the 
Ordnance Department in the purchase 
of projectiles. With this sum about 
65,000,000 projectiles have been pur- 
chased. These include shrapnel, high- 
explosive type, and gas and antiair- 
craft shells for howitzers and guns, 
weighing from 12 pounds to 1,600 or 
1,700, and costing from about $10 to 
$125 each, exclusive of the cost of ex- 
plosives or of loading the complete round. 

The rapidity with which our ord- 
nance work was accomplished is mar- 
velous when one realizes the enormous 
amount of preparation that it required. 
When war came to Europe in 1914 
there was not a single manufacturer 
in the United States propeily equipped 
to tura our large quantities of field 
artillery. The work was rapidly taken 
up by our manufacturers for our pres- 
ent allies. The magnitude of the prob- 
lem is indicated by the fact that 
thousands of dupUcate gauges had to 
be made to equip machinists for large 
quantity production. 

First, there must be made what are 
known as granelmaster gauges, flaw- 
less in their dimensions. The grand- 
master gauge is only used to check up 
a number of master gauges, and these 
master gauges in turn are relied upon 
to keep a large number of actual work- 



ing gauges up to standard. Not only 
are tens of thousands of gauges re- 
quired to equip a factory for the pro- 
duction of arms and artillery but the 
gauges must be regularly replaced. Near- 
ly a year was spent by private manu- 
facturers in this country preparing gauges 
for machine tools for arms for Great 
Britain, France and Russia. Even after 
production had been started various 
adjustments had to be made to keep 
up with the evolution of their guns 
into the present types. Both the al- 
lies and the Germans are constantly 
improving on various parts in the con- 
struction of their heavy ordnance, with 
the result that the standard type to- 
day may be changed before the dies 
have been made to carry on the work. 
We, for our part, had to train the man 
to use the guns as well as make the 
guns themselves, and we depended upon 
our allies to hold the forces of the enemy 
in check until such time as we could be 
adequately equipped to take the field. 
As the result of the efforts of our ob- 
servers at the front and the Ordnance 
office at home, we have today reached a 
production of field artillery which is 
equal to fifty per cent, of that of France. 

The United States Government has 
maintained a large staff of militarj^ 
observers on all fronts since the war 
began, and it has been their duty to 
report the result of the allied armies' 
experience in the field, so that our own 
forces might be supplied with the very 
best possible equipment with which to 
meet the enemy. 

It is a fact well known in military 
circles that British, French and Italian 
artillerists do not entirely agree in their 
theories of the proper construction of 
artillery and the control of artillery 
fire. It has been the eluty of our ob- 
servers in reporting from the front to 
sort the good points from each of our 
allies' methods anel incorporate these 
in our own guns, with the result that 
foreign military observers in this country 
admit that the artillery which is to be 
supplied to the American troops by the 
American arsenals and munition plants 
will be unsurpassed by anything used on 
the front today. 



Wins Praise of Newton D. Baker 

Secretary of War Congratulates Baltimore and Ohio Man After 
Hearing Him Sing at Divine Service in a French Church 



El 



SIGNAL honor was paid Overton 
H. Holder, a furloughed employe 
of the Baltimore and Ohio at 
Seymour, Ind., when Newton 
D. Baker, secretary of war, personally 
complimented him on his singing at 
divine service 
in a church 
somewhere in 
France." Mr. 
Holder enlisted 
in the navv 
July 6, 1917, 
and was a 
member of the 
crew on board 
the ship that 
carried the sec- 
retary of war 
to France. Mr. 
Baker not only 
complimented 
him, but also 
inquired for his 
name, age, ad- 
dress, etc. 

Mr. Holder 
is the son of 
Dr. and Mrs. 
U. H. Holder, 
of Washington, 
Ind. He was 
born May 5, 
1895, at Oak- 
land City, Ind., 
and when he 
was five years 
old went with 
his parents to 
Washington, 
Ind. When he 
he entered the 




OVERTON H. HOLDER 



was seventeen years old 
service of the Baltimore 
and Ohio at that town, and was later 
transferred to Seymour, Ind., where he was 



employed as stores department clerk in 
the division accountant's office. In that 
position he remained until called to the 
colors. 

Following is a graphic letter which 
Mr. Holder wrote to a friend : 

As we are 
nearing the 
U. S. and I can 
send mail I will 
write you now 
and mail it 
when we land. 

A few days 
after I got 
back to the 
ship from a 
short furlough 
we hauled 
anchor and 
started on 
another trip — 
this time with 
three trans- 
ports in convoy 
and Newton 
Baker, the sec- 
retary of war, 
on board our 
ship going over 
to France. 
After about 
eleven days 
out, or to be 
exact, on Sun- 
day, March 10, 
we landed at 

, France, 

where I was the 
first sailor from 
went ashore with 
as soon as we 
went at once so 
pictures to 



our ship on shore. I 
the chaplain almost 
dropped anchor. We 
we could get some moving 



14 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



15 



show on the ship, as we always have 
them each night we are in port. At first 
we had no idea where to go to find the 
American Y. M. C. A., where we thought 
we could get the films, but as the chaplain 
<?ould speak French a little we finally 
found it only a short distance from the 
dock. 

Here we found many U. S. soldiers 

and sailors as is a supply base for 

both the army and navy. Also met 
several American men and women doing 
Y. M. C. A. work and let me tell you I 
never met a finer group of people than 
the Y. M. C. A. people in charge of the 
American Y. M. C. A. in . 

The chaplain found that one of the 
men was a fraternity brother and this 
naturally caused him to treat us both 
very good. He took us through an old 
fort or castle built by Julius Caesar dur- 
ing his conquest of Gaul. Later on in 
the afternoon another ''Y" man took us 
out riding in a Ford — through the town 
and out into the country about three 
miles. Some of the streets were so nar- 
row that the Ford almost took up all the 
room. 

Wine shops are everywhere, most of 
them tended by pretty French girls, 
many of whom can speak English a little. 
Girls everywhere — all kinds — but very 
few young men and the ones you do see 
are all in uniform. We stayed six days 

in and I was ashore almost every 

day. One afternoon I was waiting on 

the dock for a boat from the to 

come and take me back when a boat came 



in with some half-naked men in it. Upon 
inquiry I found that they were the sur- 
vivors of an English supply ship hit by 
a ^Hin-fish" (sub.). 

I sing a song at church each Sunday 
morning and the morning that Secretary 
Baker was there he came up to me after 
it was over and asked me several ques- 
tions — my name, age, home, etc., after 
which he paid me a very nice compli- 
ment. He also told the commander that 
he enjoyed it and told the chaplain that 
he thought that it was a manly thing and 
he liked the way I did it without any 
affectation. Well, Buck, this coming 
from as big a man as Newton Baker is 
today, makes me feel ''sort" o' good. 

We have had tough luck this trip — 
that is going over, as we had four fellows 
to die. Two while on the way over and 

two while we were in port at . 

The two that died at sea were buried at 
sea with an honor military burial. 

All hands were called aft to the quarter 
deck, where lay the bodies wrapped in a 
large beautiful American flag. The band 
played, the chaplain said a prayer and 
preached the sermon, a squad of sailors 
fired two volleys with rifles, a bugler 
sounded 'Haps" and at the last note the 
bodies were released to slide down the 
specially built slide into the sea. All 
during this ceremony our ship and the 
transports with us were stopped and all 
had their flags at half-mast. The two 

that died at were given the same 

sort of burial only they were buried in a 
cemetery outside the city of . 



The American Red Cross 

What It Is and What It Does 



(PART II) 



What is the Red Cross Town and Country 
Nursing Service? 

It is the branch of the Red Cross 
Nursing Service through which specially 
prepared Red Cross nurses are sent out 
into small towns and rural districts for 
public health nursing. 

Who pays the salaries of Public Health 
Nurses? 

The local organization employing them. 
The Red Cross assigns them to duty and 
extends a general supervision over their 
work. 

What . kind of organizations may employ 
Red Cross Public Health Nurses? 

Any organization engaged in public 
health nursing, whether public or private, 
which will affiliate itself with the Red 
Cross Town and Country Nursing Ser- 
vice. 

What is the purpose of the Educational 
Courses in Nursing offered by the Red Cross? 

The object of the course in Elementary 
Hygiene and Home Care of the Sick is 
to teach women personal and household 
hygiene in order that they may acquire 
those habits of right living which will 
aid in the prevention of sickness, and to 
give them simple instruction in the care 
of the sick in their own homes. 

The object of the course in Home 
Dietetics is to teach women the proper 
sekiction and nutritive value of food and 
the importance of a well-balanced diet, 
and also to improve their knowledge of 
buying, cooking and serving in their own 
homes. 



To what extent have hospital relief supplies 
been furnished through volunteer effort? 

The mobiUzation of the women of the 
country in producing Red Cross Relief 
Supplies is an accomplishment eclipssd 
only by the result of their effort. The 
output of surgical dressings alone, for 
use abroad, now amounts, according to 
conservative estimates, to the enormous 
number of 100,000,000 a year. The pro- 
bable value of the womlen's labor during 
1918, on projects under way at the begin- 
ning of the year, will exceed $36,000,000. 

WORK AMONG SOLDIERS AND SAILORS 
IN THIS COUNTRY. 

What is the character of the Red Cross work 
among soldiers and sailors in this Country? 

There are three main lines of activity: 
Camp Service; Canteen Service; and San- 
itary Service. 

What is the Red Cross Camp Service? 

Camp Service renders emergency aid 
and performs such work as the distri- 
bution of sweaters, helmets, mufflers, 
socks, kits, etc., at training camps, can- 
tonments and naval stations. Red Cross 
warehouses are maintained at more than 
twenty-five mihtary bases. 

Representatives of the Red Cross visit 
hospitals at the camps, cantonments and 
naval bases, rendering such comfort and 
assistance as is possible to the sick 
soldiers. 

By authority of the Secretary of War, 
the Red Cross is erecting convalescent 
houses at the camps and cantonments. 
These convalescent houses will have sun 
parlors, and, in some cases, sleeping 
accommodations for the relatives of an}' 
soldier who is seriously ill. 



16 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



17 



The department of Civilian Relief 
maintains at each camp one or more 
representatives, who are always at the 
service of the soldiers. The prime func- 
tion of these men is to help relieve any 
anxiety a soldier may have about the 
welfare of his folks at home, and at his 
personal request to inform the Home 
Service Section of the Red Cross Chapter 
in his home town. Thereupon the Home 
Service Section of that Chapter will visit 
the soldier's family quietly and unobtru- 
sively, and give all the neighborly, 
friendly aid it can. 

What is Canteen Service? 

The Red Cross has established Can- 
teen Service at more than 500 important 
railway stations, which are prepared to 
furnish refreshments to the soldiers when 
traveling. At a number of the more 
important railway centers the Canteen 
Service, through cooperation with the 
Red Cross Motor Corps, is in position 
to transfer sick or injured soldiers from 
the train to the local hospital when re- 
quested. A booklet, outlining this work 
and giving the names of all the stations 
at which this Canteen Service is available, 
will be placed in the hands of the com- 
mander of each troop train when leaving 
camp, so that the men can avail them- 
selves of this service when desired. 

What is Sanitary Service? 

The Red Cross cooperates with public 
health authorities to safeguard the health 
of the civilian populations, Uving adjacent 
to military zones. In this capacity the 
Red Cross conducts a house-to-house in- 
spection of dairies, restaurants, markets, 
etc.; investigates and promptly reports 
all cases of infectious and contagious 
diseases and maintains a public health 
laboratory. 

WORK AMONG OUR CIVILIAN 
POPULATION 
What are the occasions for Red Cross Relief 
work among our Civilian Population? 

(a) At all times physical disasters, such 
as floods, tornadoes, fires, explosions, 
earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mine 
accidents, and the Uke. This work is 
known as '^Disaster Relief." 

(6) In times of war, the need for keep- 
ing up the morale of the nation by main- 



taining as far as possible the normal 
standards of life. This need is especially 
urgent in the case of tlie famihes of our 
soldiers and sailors. Such work is known 
as ''Home Service." 

How is disaster relief provided? 

The smaller disasters are, as a rule, 
taken care of by the local Red Cross 
Chapter, in close cooperation with such 
citizens and organizations of the commu- 
nity as will form an effective emergency 
relief committee. 

Major disasters, such as a terrible 
explosion, a devastating flood, or an 
earthquake, require such relief as must 
have centralized direction to be effective. 
Relief in such disasters is directed from 
Headquarters in Washington. 

What is Home Service? 

Home Service is that phase of Red 
Cross work which is concerned with the 
welfare in times of war of the famihes 
of men enlisted in the service of our 
country, and also of famihes, residing in 
this country, of men enlisted in the ser- 
vice of our allies. It extends to famihes 
of men in all branches of the service, and 
also to the families of civilians who have 
been wounded or killed as a direct result 
of war activities. Its object is to help 
keep up the morale of the men in the 
service by helping to maintain the morale 
of their families at home, keeping them 
in good spirits, health and comfort. The 
Home Service of the Red Cross must be 
the nation's assurance that no enlisted 
man's family will suffer from lack of any 
essential thing that lies within its power 
to give. 

Does Home Service contemplate Financial 
Relief? 

While financial assistance will be given 
by the Home Service Sections of Red 
Cross Chapters to tide over emergency 
needs of families. Home Service is essen- 
tially not relief in the sense of money 
payments, or doles of food or clothing. 
The War Risk Insurance Law has made 
the necessary financial . provision for 
dependent wives and other relatives of 
men in the service. Home Service aims to 
make those whom it serves, as far as pos- 
sible, both self-reliant and self-sufficient 



18 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



What are the opportunities of Home Ser- 
vice? 

1. Conservation by service of human 
resources wherever deterioration is 
threatened. 

2. Temporary financial reKef of fami- 
nes where there is an emergency. 

3. ResponsibiUty for financial assist- 
ance in cases not covered by Government 
allowance. 

4. Personal service to the returned 
soldier or sailor, especially when he is 
disabled. 

5. An information service which will 
save time, trouble and anxiety for the 
lonely relatives of enlisted men. 

How does the Red Cross Home Service learn 
of these opportunities? 

From the man in the service, or from 
a member of his family, or some one com- 
petent to speak for them. Home Service 
does not intrude itself, and goes to no 
family without a definite introduction or 
invitation. 

How is Home Service Work organized? 

For each of the fourteen divisions of the 
Red Cross there is a Division Director of 
Civilian Relief, who is in charge of the 
civilian work in his territory. In each 
chapter there is a Civilian Relief Com- 
mittee, as a part of which there is organ- 
ized a Home Service Section to look after 
all the local Home Service cases. This 
Home Service Section is sometimes iden- 
tical with the Civilian Relief Committee, 
but it has always a distinct function. 

The Home Service Section is composed 
largely of Red Cross volunteers, and has 
a membership as representative as pos- 
sible of the various local interests — 
business, professional, church and social 
work. It is under the direction of an 
executive secretary, who knows the 
existing community resources and how 
to make the most of them. 

FUNDS FOR WORK AT HOME 
AND ABROAD 

How are the activities of the Red Cross 
financed? 

(a) All ()V(;rh(\'id expenses, including 
salari(;s, of Uh) (!nl ir(i H(h1 ('ross organiza- 
tion (national head(iuarters, division 



headquarters, local chapters, branches 
and auxiliaries) are met by membership 
dues. 

(6) War Relief is paid for out of the 
Red Cross War Fund. No expenses of 
administration in the United States are 
paid out of the War Fund. Every dollar 
contributed for relief goes for relief. 

What is the Red Cross War Fund? 

This is a fund raised for war relief by 
voluntary contributions of the people. 
The first war fund was raised in June, 
1917, and amounted to a little more than 
$100,000,000. The date of the second 
War Fund Campaign, also for $100,000,- 
000 has been set for May, 1918. 

Who administers the Red Cross War Fund? 

Expenditures of the Red Cross War 
Fund are made only upon the authority 
of the Red Cross War Council. 

What is the Red Cross War Council? 

On May 10, 1917, President Wilson, as 
President of the American Red Cross, 
appointed a War Council of seven mem- 
bers to direct the work of the Red Cross 
in the extraordinary emergency created 
by the entrance of the United States into 
the war. The War Council is recognized 
by law and by international convention 
as the pubHc instrumentality for war 
relief work. 

Through what sources does the War Council 
administer this fund? 

(a) The War Fund, beyond the amount 
granted to the chapters, is administered 
by the War Council through the Red 
Cross Commissions sent to. the various 
countries in Europe for military and 
civihan reUef abroad, and through the 
fourteen division headquarters for mili- 
tary and civilian relief in America. 

(6) Under the terms on which the first 
War Fund was subscribed the chapters 
were permitted to request the refund of 
a per cent, (not to exceed twenty-five per 
cent.) of the money actually collected by 
them. Money thus received by the 
chai)t ers must be spent for war relief work 
and su(;h other (expenditures as are ap- 
proved by the Red Cross War Council. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



1 



How is the distribution of funds of the 
American Red Cross made in Europe in 
connection with the war? 

Special commissions have been sent 
to France, Italy, England, Belgium, 
Serbia, Roumania and Russia to in- 
vestigate the needs of the military and 
civil populations of these countries and 
to establish working organizations 
through which these needs may be 
supphed. These foreign organizations 
report the needs abroad to the organiza- 
tion in America; the organization in 
America in turn furnishes personnel, 
supplies and funds to meet these re- 
quirements. 

Red Cross Work in Europe 

FRANCE 

How do Red Cross supplies from this coun- 
try reach their destination in France? 

Fundamental to all Red Cross activi- 
ties abroad is the problem of transpor- 
tation. Materials for use abroad must 
go across the Atlantic and must reach 
the places in the interior where they are 
needed. To minimize effort and expense 
large warehouses have been established 
throughout the United States at con- 
venient points where finished supplies 
from the chapters are collected and then 
transferred in bulk to the port from 
which they are to be shipped. Vast 
quantities of medical and other relief 
supplies are being sent almost daily to 
Europe. Upon arrival of these materials 
at the French port, they are conveyed 
by Red Cross motor trucks to large 
warehouses throughout France, and from 
these warehouses medical supplies are 
distributed to hospitals; foodstuffs, 
clothing, building material and agri- 
cultural implements to the civilian popu- 
lation. 

THE HUMAN SIDE OF THE AMERICAN 
RED CROSS IN FRANCE 

What is the relation of our Red Cross to the 
American Army in France? 

The American Red Cross recognizes 
that our first duty for humanity in this 
war is the protection of our soldiers ia 
France. It recognizes also that this 
duty lies with the United States govern- 



ment and that the government is re- 
sponsi!)le for it. As a supplementary 
relief organization the Red Cross stands 
ready to cooperate with the government 
in this work, and to put its organization, 
money and supplies into service at the 
call of the American Army whenever and 
wherever they can be of use. Fully 
realizing the disadvantages that are al- 
ways met in a foreign country, and with 
the view of keeping our soldiers in touch 
with things American, the Red Cross 
begins at the port of landing in France 
by establishing rest stations. These 
rest stations extend inland toward the 
camps and are located in a series at junc- 
tion points and railroad stations where 
the soldiers are required to wait for train 
connections. 

What is meant by a Rest Station? 

Rest stations are each made up of 
from two to four barracks, forty to 
one hundred and sixty feet long. They 
include infirmaries fully equipped; dis- 
pensaries; rest and reading rooms; dor- 
mitories holding from forty to two hun- 
dred beds, with shower baths and 
disinfectors; and restaurants capable 
in some cases of giving refreshments to 
a thousand men in an hour. Here our 
men have properly prepared food, the 
welcome of American men and women, 
and a comfortable place to pass those 
tiresome stop-overs on the way to their 
final destination. The staff includes a 
manager, several volunteer workers, and 
in some cases a nurse. 

What is the Red Cross doing for the French 
and American soldiers on duty? 

There are two distinct phases of Red 
Cross relief work for soldiers on duty; 
the operating of rolling canteens, and the 
maintaining of stationary canteens back 
of the fighting line. 

A most daring, yet essential work, is 
that of operating rolling canteens. Often 
a soldier leaves the trench utterly ex- 
hausted. These rolling canteens go right 
down to the communicating trenches 
where the soldiers, passing in and out, 
receive their Quarts" full of steaming 
bouillon or coffee in winter, or cold 
drinks in summer. 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



At junction points on the French rail- 
roads, troops going on leave from the 
battle front often have to spend hours 
waiting for trains. Since there are 
probably not more than a half dozen 
important junctions and an average of 
20,000 men pass each day, only a small 
fraction of them could I ■ housed. For- 
merly thousands had to sleep in the open, 
often in the rain. These men come from 
the fighting zone tired, hungry, infected. 
It is for such emergency that the station- 
ary canteen is conducted. At the can- 
teen the men can obtain substantial hot 
meals at cost, prepared by American 
women; can have hot baths and have 
their clothes cleaned and sterilized and 
take the train refreshed in body and spirit. 
As the number of American soldiers in 
France grows, the canteen will necessarily 
become a greater factor and will be most 
potent in maintaining the morale of our 
army. 

What is the American Red Cross doing for 
the wounded soldier in France? 

The chief work of the American Red 
Cross in helping care for wounded sol- 
diers lies in its cooperation with the 
government in supplying an efficient 
nursing service; in assisting the Army 
Medical Corps in cases of emergency, 
and in furnishing materials for hospitals. 

There were on March 1, 1918, more 
than twenty-three hundred American 
Red Cross nurses employed in Base 
Hospitals and in the French Military 
Hospitals throughout the Republic. The 
total number of hospitals of various sorts 
in the French RepubUc exceeds five 
thousand, and more' than half of these 
are receiving all or part of their medical 
and surgical supplies from the American 
R(h1 Cross. 

What are we doing for the permanently 
disabled soldiers? 

The le-education of mutilated soldiers 
is being carri(Kl on jointly by the French 
Government and the American Red Cross. 
There 'dro bc^tween fifty and sixty schools 
of various kinds for this work. The Red 
Ooss has provid(Hl more than six hundred 
mutilated soldiers with artificial legs of 
the best typ(;, and has established a 



factory near Paris where artificial limbs 
are manufactured. By arranging for 
consultation l)etwcen the surgeon and 
the manufacturer, the Red Cross has 
been able to secure the best possible 
treatment for each case. 

The mutilated soldier must return to 
ordinary community life, and should 
enter industry on a basis of competition 
with able-bodied men. Cripples who 
have lost an arm or a leg, and at first 
seem hopelessly disabled, can be taught 
many processes of industry, such as 
running a lathe, operating a motor tractor, 
controlling a drill, and even the use of 
farm machinery. For the re-education 
of mutilated French soldiers, a five- 
hundred acre farm near Tours has been 
obtained by the Red Cross and placed 
under a competent director. 

What is the Red Cross doing for the civil 
population of France? 

With the wanton destruction of homes 
by the German Army and the uprooting 
of the population in the devastated 
regions, the home as ah institution in 
France is in peril. Reahzing this con- 
dition, the Red Cross is endeavoring to 
keep the soldiers' homes intact; to find 
homes for the outcast children who have 
neither homes nor parents and to help 
the refugees and repatries to find a place 
to live until they shall be able to rebuild 
their homes. 

How are we reaching the home of the French 
soldier? 

The most telling work of the Red Cross 
in France, as far as helping to win the 
war goes, is the care of the families of the 
French soldiers. The Red Cross is 
giving to the needy families of these 
French soldiers supplies and money, 
according to their needs and its capacity. 
If impossible to give supplies, it gives 
money. The information which serves 
as a basis of distribution comes from the 
soldier himself. The company officer 
secures this information from the soldier, 
transmits it to the French general, and 
he in turn informs the Red Cross Com- 
mission. 

{To he continued ) 



J. C. McCahan, Jr., Manager of Mail and 
Express Traffic, Serving on 
Important Committees 




BHE selection of J. C. McCahan, 
Jr., manager of mail and ex- 
press traffic of the Baltimore 
and Ohio, to serve on three im- 
portant committees — Committee on Mail 
Transportation of the United States 
Railroad Administration, Committee on 
Handling Railroad Business Mail of the 
American Railway 
Association and the 
Statistical Commit- 
tee on Railway Mail 
Pay — is a high trib- 
ute to his ability. On 
May 1 Mr. McCahan 
rounded out twenty- 
five years' service 
with the Company. 

He entered the 
service of the Balti- 
more and Ohio as a 
clerk and stenog- 
rapher in the office 
of the maf^ter car 
builder at Camden 
Station. On June 1, 
1895, he was made 
secretary to the gen- 
eral superintendent 
motive power and 
in 1898 went to the 
office of the general 

superintendent of transportation. On 
May 1, 1900, he entered the office of the 
assistant general manager. 

Mr. McCahan on June 7, 1901, was 
appointed secretary to the assistant 
general manager and served in that ca- 
pacity under J. T. Leary, now comptroller 
of the Company, T. J. Foley, now vice- 
president of the Illinois Central, and 
L. G. Haas. On July 1, 1903, he was 
promoted to head clerk to the assistant 
general manager. 

His next promotion came on Septem- 
ber 16, 1907, when he was made mail 
inspector. Three years later he was 
appointed supervisor of mails. He was 



r 



J. C. McCAHAN, Jr. 



appointed supervisor of mail traffic on 
May 1, 1912, and on December 1, 1917, 
was appointed • manager mail and ex- 
press traffic, which office he now holds. 

As a member of the Committee on 
Mail Transportation of the United States 
Railroad Administration he is asso- 
ciated with Guy Adams, mail traffic 
manager of the Union 
Pacific System, who 
is chairman ; Rudolph 
Brauer, superinten- 
dent of the railway 
mail service at Oma- 
ha; G. P. Conard, 
secretary of the Asso- 
ciation of Transpor- 
tation and Car 
Accounting Officers; 
H. L. Fairfield, man- 
ager of mail traffic 
of the Central of 
Georgia, and H. T. 
Mason, manager of 
mail traffic of the 
Frisco lines. Mr. 
McCahan represents 
the eastern region. 

The committee is 
to study the entire 
subject of mail trans- 
portation and one 
of its purposes is to effect a greater 
degree of cooperation between the rail- 
road mail service and the post office 
department. Headquarters have been 
established in the Southern Railway 
Building in Washington. 

Mr. Adams is also chairman of the 
Committee on Handling Railroad Bus- 
iness Mail of the American Railway Asso - 
ciation. In addition to Mr. McCahan, 
Mr. Conard is also a member of this 
committee. 

The chairman of the Statistical Com- 
mittee on Railway Mail Pay is S. C. 
Scott, vice-president's assistant of the 
Pennsylvania lines. 



21 




22 



Mount Clare Bowlers are Awarded Trophies 
for 1917-1918 Season 



HFTER a strenuous season, mem- 
bers of the bowling teams of 
the Mt. Clare Welfare, Athletic 
and Pleasure Association were 
awarded valuable prizes at an enter- 
tainment and dance held at Lehman 
Hall, Baltimore, on the evening of May 
28. The presentation speeches were 
made by John T. Broderick, supervisor 
of special bureaus, and Dr. E. M. Parlett, 
chief of the welfare bureau. 

The program opened with vaudeville 
numbers. The Mt. Clare Orchestra, 
C. W. Hake, director, and L. F. Schwa- 
tora, leader, was first on the bill and came 
in for much well-earned applause. The 
other entertainers included Norman the 
Magician, the McCaslin Sisters, singers 
and dancers, and James Young, mono- 
loguist. 

Then followed the distribution of 
prizes. Mr. Broderick, who was intro- 
duced by H. A. Beaumont, chairman of 
the committee of arrangements, made a 
brief address in which he congratulated 
L. Finegan, superintendent of Mt. Clare 
shops, and his associates on the excellent 
work performed at that place. He spoke 
of the splendid results obtained at Mt. 
Clare in the first Red Cross drive, the 
third Liberty Loan campaign and the 
second Red Cross drive, then under way. 
He praised the members of the welfare 
association for their activities in the in- 
terest of clean sportsmanship and urged 
that they Cooperate in every way pos- 
sible to make the 1918 baseball season a 
huge success. 

The prize for the high individual aver- 
age was awarded D. W. Baker, who, as 
stated in the May issue of the Magazine, 
won the trophy for the high individual 
average in the System-Wide Bowling 
League. Mr. Baker was not on hand to 
receive his prize as he has entered the 
army and is stationed at Camp Meade, 
Md. 



Other awards follow: High individual 
score, one game, C. Sauer; high team 
score, three games, Mt. Clare Press team; 
high average bowler each team — Account- 
ing Department, H. T. Beck; Mt. Clare 
Press, T. Flaherty; No. 2 Machine Shop, 
W. R. Ryan; Stores Department, F. 
Hartman; Pipe and Tin Shops, C. Cum- 
mings; Pattern Shop, J. Schlarb; Boiler 
Shop, M. Weinrich; Foundry, M. Heck- 
wolf; Mechanics, G. Zepp. 

The final standing of the teams was 
No. 2 Machine Shop, Accounting Depart- 
ment, Stores Department, Pipe and Tin 
Shops, Pattern Shop, Mt. Clare Press, 
Mechanics, Boiler Shop and Foundry. 
Each team was awarded monetary prizes 
according to standing. The members of 
No. 2 Machine Shop having finished first, 
received five stick pins and the welfare 
cup. This team won the championship 
in the System- Wide Bowling League, 
which carried with it the cup given by 
vice-president J. M. Davis. 

Dr. Parlett presented the cup on be- 
half of the welfare bureau. He said, in 
part : " Champions of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad System Bowling League, 
and winners of the Davis Cup, I heartily 
congratulate you and wish you new 
laurels for the future. The proficiency 
you have demonstrated has been brilliant 
and a source of great pride to your many 
admirers. The rest of the Baltimore and 
Ohio family may well emulate the high 
standard you have set. May victory 
ever pursue you." 

The officers of the association are: 
George W. Smith, president; W. D. 
Lenderking, vice-president ; Cornelius 
Roe, secretary; Harry T. Beck, finan- 
cial secretary; M. S. Albrecht, treasurer; 
L. Finegan, C. N. Southcomb, J. E. 
Tatum, George W. Smith, H. A. Beau- 
mont, W. S. Eyerly, W. D. Lenderking, 
J. D. Wright and William Kern, board 
of trustees. 



23 



From the Boys "Over There" 



THE following letter was received by 
W. H. Manss, assistant to vice-president, 
in charge of Commercial Development 
Department from a former employe of that 
office. 

My Dear Mr. Manss: 

I received yesterday, after these many 
months, a letter which you had sent to me at 
Camp Grant after our departure from there. 
It contained a mighty good letter from Chester 
Thompson; and right in the same mail was one 
from "Joe" Chatterton, which you w^ere also 
kind enough to ship along to me and which 
came direct over here rather than by a cir- 
cuitous route. 

Since I last wrote you we have moved and 
are now with the 42nd Division, which I note 
is the same that Pryor is with. As soon as 
the opportunity presents itself I sure will look 
Pryor up, so that we can compare notes and get 
together generally. 

I am also not far distant from the hospital 
where Dunning is located, but in the zone of 
the army in which we now find ourselves, it is 
more or less difficult to travel except on official 
business, and I have yet to conjure up anything, 
even semi-official, which will carry me any- 
where near Dunning. 

You remember A. C. Van Zandt, of Mr. 
Hamilton's office? I have heard from him once 
or twice and find that he is with the Director 
General of Transportation in some clerical 
work in his general office, or rather with the 
a.ssistant to the director. While in Paris on 
duty I had a mighty fine talk with General 
Atterbury, who seemed to know personally most 
of the Jialtimore and Ohio men who were in his 
service. It nuro would be mighty finci and a 
great experience to be attached to his staff. 
A letter of introduction irom Mr. Thomp.son got 
me a most cordial reception and a mighty fine 
man i fcnuid the diicdor lo be. 



I have had in the past months very little 
opportunity to do any railroading, although 
for a time on the other job we had. I was more 
or less of a trainmaster on one of the French 
lines and got rnore or less acquainted with 
their methods of doing business. In the hand- 
ling of equipment they are mighty careful and 
their power lasts for years and years; in fact, 
one of the engines we had in our yard was 
built in 1882, which is a fair sample of their con- 
servation of power. You are, of course, fami- 
liar with the type and size of their cars, but, 
because of the coupler arrangements, they can 
do little or none of the fast switching that is 
possible with our couplers, although they stood 
speechless when one of our crews in the yard 
made a flying switch and the inspector was at 
once on our necks because of it. They have in 
their ordre de transport a combination bill of 
lading waybill, receipt card bill, that the car 
travels on, and a station record that would be 
mighty fine if it were possible to make it out on 
the typewriter, but they "ball" that up by 
so many sundry supplementary forms that they 
nullify the value of the best thing I have yet 
seen in their work. They are, however, mighty 
accurate in their records and their shops and 
roundhouses are models of order and neatness, 
but not so much so on output of work. But one 
and all they are fine with the Americans and 
considerate of their deficiencies in the language, 
but horrified at the speed with which they do 
and want to do things. 

I have had some little experience lately with 
some of their civil engineers. They are fine 
technically, but, oh, so far behind practically 
that even one so unversed in engineering matters 
as I can point out to them fallacies in their 
practice. 

Have heard from Thompson, who seems very 
enthusiatic about his company, but I fear that 
wlien he gets over here his enthusiasm will 
more or less "pi'ter out," as very very few of 



24 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



25 



finy of the organizations that come over get 
at the work they came to do unless it be the 
stevedore, who, however, never gets far from 
the base ports. 

If you will write my father at Moundsville 
I feel sure he will be glad to send you one of 
the pictures that I had taken before I left for 
this side. I myself have not seen them, but 
I hope I was treated wdth mercy rather than 
justice. 

Letters are sure mighty welcome over here 
as until yesterday it had been five weeks since 
I received one. 

My best regards to all the office force. Tell 
them I have time to read letters if not to write 
them. When you are walking four miles to work 
and the same distance in return, you can imagine 
that one is not too greatly enthusiatic about 
writing or anything, in fact, except hitting the 
hay. 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) A. C. Spurr. 

Company 21st Engineers, 
A. E. F., via New York. 



From a Former Engineer at South Chicago 

Somewhere in the Mud. 

Dear Friend Frank: 

I received yours of January IL The box 
with the oil can came about two weeks ago, 
and a prouder Hog Head was never seen. 
Everybody stops to examine it and says "some" 
can. I feel pretty proud of it as it is the first 
regular American oil can in France in the army. 
I am going to have it engraved and bring it back 
for a souvenir. 

That sure was some box you made; just what 
I wanted to keep. things in. Yes, the can got 
here in fine shape, and has been under fire 
several times already. I take as much care of 
it as I do of the old machine engine. I ex- 
pect to go to Paris in about a month for three 
days, or I can have a seven day leave to go 
any place else. 

Well, a star in a service flag is fine, but our 
regiment is the first to get a war service stripe. 
As you know, I told you before that we were 
the first American troops to see active service 
and to be under shell fire. 

I do not know John Voight, but will look 
him up, although I have engineer John Wilkin- 
son's boy for a brakeman very often. 

Talk about weather, well we are sure having 
it, although it did not snow so much. It has 
been awful cold and damp. 

Yes, I will have a picture soon, but can't tell 
when, as these Frenchmen are the slowest 
people on earth taking pictures. 

I got the Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, but 
not the Engineers'. It may come tomorrow, 
as there is to be 125 bags of mail to come in 
then. 

Please don't tell me about your good eight 
hour jobs. Why we haven't even got a six- 



teen hour law over here. And we sure need 
a grievance man over here more than any i)lace 
else. We have to set up our own wedges, draw 
our own oil, fill headlights, clean fires, fill 
lubricators, and if they say so, go out and wipe 
her up, and even work in the ash pit if they 
want us to. But it don't matter much, as it 
all means army pay. 

The day call boy is a corporal, and most of 
the engineers are privates. Pretty tough, 
when the call boy makes more money than an 
engineer — ha! ha! But it is all in the game, and 
nobody kicks. We sure have as good a bunch 
of railroad men as ever got together, and are 
from all over the States. 

Gee! The caller just came in and told me 
I would not get out tonight, as they are going to 
wash her out tomorrow. 

In your wife's last letter she said somewhere 
behind the clouds the sun is shining. Well, 
maybe, but them am sure powerful big clouds. 

In a few days we take over a little more 
mileage, so that our division will be twice as 
long. I am afraid it is going to be prett;^^ hard, 
as we get nothing but fine coal, just like the 
Baltimore and Ohio use on their stokers, only 
there is more mud in it. But war is hell any 
way you take it, so will close for tonight. With 
best wishes to you and Lady Edwards, I am, 

Your friend, 

Corporal H. L. Tibbals. 

Company D, 13th Engineers (R'y), 
U. S. Army, via New York, A. E. F. 

St. George Yard Conductor with the 
Old 69th of New York 

Just a line to let you all know that I am still 
alive and enjoying good health. 

Have been through the mill and now back 
at a camp behind the lines feeling none the 
worse for my experience. Our regiment (the 
old 69th) has been all through France by 
foot. We spent six days and nights in the 
trenches, during which time I had all the ex- 
perience a soldier can have — been over the 
top, in gas raids, and through shot and shell 
fire. 

Colonel Hine has left us, having gone since 
last January, 

We have had a tough winter over here. Had 
to march through snow, which was knee deep. 
The weight of the sack on my back was so 
heavy at times that I felt like dropping by the 
wayside. 

It certainly is a sad scene to be walking' 
through desecrated villages — the work of the 
Hun. They never leave anything standing 
when they desert a town. 

The boys are all happy, and have the same 
old saying, "Where do we go from here boys? 
Anywhere as long as it is to some place where 
we can get a shot at the Hun." 

Corporal M. J. Leonard. 
Company F, 165th Infantry, U. S. A., A. E. F, 



Physical Fitness 



By Dr. E. M. Parlett 

Chief of Welfare Bureau 



10 



|N the present war emergency 
every life conserved to the AlHed 
nations is equivalent to the 
destruction of one of the enemy. 
To achieve physical fitness is the prime 
duty of man — the citizen, the employe 
or the fighter. 

To keep superbly fit makes it possible 
to superbly think, work, play and, in 
national emergency, to fight and to 
win. This we shall do in the present 
emergency by and with our Government's 
help, whose first consideration is for, 
and whose strength depends upon, the 
health of its soldiers and its civilians. 

Dissipation, whether in social habits, 
food, or alcoholic drink, may be charac- 
terized as no less than a crime against 
the worthy, honest, and democracy- 
loving progenitors of our race, our State 
and our splendid national army and 
citizenry, and our offspring. Dissipa- 
tion can lead but to physical and mental 
degeneracy. Its ear-marks are loss of 
mental vigor, physical stamina, and moral 
tone, which, when the crucial test comes 
to this nation, the employer or the indi- 
vidual, will find him upon whom the 
nation and the family has depended, 
sadly wanting. 

The future fitness of the race depends 
now upon the youth of the land — for 
it is during the early years of manhood 
that the foundations of most of the 
degenerative diseases are laid. There- 
fore, vigorous stops must be taken to 
curtail the increasing waste of the life and 
vitality of the present and generations to 
follow. A rigid adherence to health laws, 
to systematized athletics and recreational 
activities — more sleep, moderation in eat- 
ing, habits and indulgences, in i\w (^x(;ess- 
ive use of tobacco, eschewing all alcoholic 



beverages and grosser practices, the eat- 
ing of meat or eggs but once daily, the 
thorough mastication of food, the erect 
posture, deep breathing, careful atten- 
tion to personal hygiene as regards exer- 
cise, bathing, clothing, rest, recreation, 
ventilation, sunlight and fresh air, the 
avoidance of over-fatigue, special at- 
tention to the teeth, digestion, eye- 
sight and work-shop illumination, the 
avoidance of social diseases, etc., must be 
matters of careful consideration by all 
who desire, as all of us do, virile, physical 
and mental vigor. 

A conquest of the acute communi- 
cable and pestilential disease can suc- 
ceed only by strict observance to fun- 
damental hygiene and sanitary laws and 
a close and intelligent cooperation with 
city, state and federal health author- 
ties, whose object is to protect the heal- 
thy from the sick by the administration 
of such measures as quarantine, isola- 
tion, the elimination of noxious elements 
in workshops and other places, the de- 
struction of disease transmitting vermin 
and pests, the protection of food and 
beverages against contamination, the 
purifying of water, milk, etc., and at 
all times making careful studies of con- 
ditions which may lead to disease among 
our soldiers and citizens. 

Keeping well means more than es- 
caping consultations with the family 
physician; it means a constantly well- 
oiled, well-geared, and well-functioned 
physical and mental machine. The phys- 
ical machine needs even more careful and 
judicious handling, protection from abuse, 
contamination and clogging, healthful 
environment, proper fuel, proper rest, 
poise, and systematized and carefully 
arranged program of action, and periodic 



26 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



27 



inspection by the specialist, than the most 
intricate and wonderfully contrived ma- 
chine ever constructed through human 
ingenuity. 

One of the nation's chief vices is a lack 
of interest in such vital matters. 

To the railroad man — the clerk, the 
shopman, the trackman or the trainman 
— who values his chief asset, his earning 
or productive capacity, which depends 
primarily on good health, the following 
items are of paramount importance : 

When working under conditions not 
conducive to good health, you are 
giving not only your service for compen- 
sation but your health as well. It is 
well to know and remember that many of 
the objectionable conditions under which 
men work are brought about by the 
worker himself because of his apathy, 
unsound practices and unfamiharity with 
certain fundamentals of hygiene. 

Place of work should be well ventilated 
so that the air is kept cool (65° to 70°), 
fresh and in motion. For office men, 
pauses for five minutes once in the morn- 
ing and afternoon should be made to 
thoroughly air the room by throwing wide 
all the windows ; this should be done at the 
noon hour also. Incidentally, sunlight 
is a great health booster and the most 
efficient germ destroyer known. Are you 
doing your part to keep doors and win- 
dows open to make your place of work 
comfortable, cool and refreshing? 

Are you keeping your living and sleep- 
ing apartments well ventilated and bathed 
in sunlight, whenever possible? 

Is your office, shop or work place 
adequately lighted? Proper illumination 
is of the greatest aid to efficiency; a 
great preventive of spoiled machine 
product and eye troubles. Arrange your 
light so that the rays come trom over 
your shoulder upon the work and so 
shaded that the direct glare in your 
eyes is obviated. 

Are your lockerp, wash rooms and 
toilets kept clean, well ventilated and 
hghted, and free from disease breeding 
conditions? Are you doing your part to 
avoid abusing rest house and other 
facilities and in preventing thoughtless 
and indifferent fellow-employes from 
doing likewise? 



Are you careful always to hold the 
hand or handkerchief before the mouth 
and nose when coughing and sneezing? 
Are you aware of the great danger of 
spreading such diseases as influenza, 
tuberculosis and colds by this so-called 
droplet or spray method? 

Are you spreading disease by pro- 
miscuous spitting? If so, stop it! You 
do not care to be a potential murderer, 
or one who robs a fellow worker's fam- 
ily of his support and protection by 
bringing him down with tuberculosis. 
Five per cent, of the population, approxi- 
matety, suffer from tuberculosis in its 
various stages; that means 5,000,000 
in the United States who are liable to 
spread this disease to others by spitting, 
coughing or sneezing. 

Do you still make use of the common 
towel and drinking cup? If so, the 
sooner you stop this practice the longer 
you will probably live. Is the water 
you drink of standard purity? Have 
you investigated? 

Are you interested in the health con- 
ditions of the community in which you 
live? Have you solicited the Health 
Department to cooperate with you in 
improving objectionable neighborhood 
conditions? 

Are you alive to the fact that flies 
and mosquitoes spread typhoid, malaria 
and other diseases, and that they invaria- 
bly breed in garbage, manure and stag- 
nant water, and that your active help, 
coupled with aid from the local health 
department, can effectively rid your 
premises of these pests? 

Do you know that bad teeth and good 
health are as far apart as the poles? 
Won't you take the trouble to have 
your teeth thoroughly cleaned by a dent- 
ist once every six months; to have them 
repaired at once if necessary, and to 
cleanse them morning and night with 
a good tooth brush? 

Are you taking physical exercise and 
a bath every day of your life? 

Are you having a yearly physical 
examination made to avoid being one of 
the 100,000 who annually die of Bright's 
disease and several hundred thousand 
more who die of heart disease, apoplexy, 
tuberculosis and cancer? These diseases 



28 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



are all preventable by early discovery 
and treatment with little expense to you 
for this slight trouble. 

The present era is one of a nation- 
wide war waged against disease. There 
are 600,000 preventable and needless 
deaths in this country every year. 
Physicians are no longer dealing exclu- 
sively with the purely curative part of 
their profession; they are no longer in- 
different to the needless sufferings, dis- 
ease and deaths occurring every year 
in the United States; they are no longer 
bhnd to preventive measures to control 
and stamp out disease, for such are 
really the highest ideals and greatest 
opportunities of their calling for bene- 
fiting mankind. 



This likewise is the aim of the Wel- 
fare Bureau. 

While you still have your health 
it is our ambition to make you appreciate 
it and help you preserve it. Your per- 
sonal efficiency and, therefore, our national 
efficiency depend upon good health. 
Nothing is so certain as death; you 
can but do your part to help to 
make that certainty as far off as pos- 
sible and in the meantime minimize the 
poverty and sorrow which disease brings 
in its wake. 

Can anything be fairer or cheaper or 
more alluring than a frank appeal to 
you to take an immediate, enthusiastic 
and vital interest in the preservation 
of your own health? 




During 1917 the Company's loss by fire, caused by defective wiring, 
amounted to the above figures. 

The investigations of the Fire Prevention Department have proven that 
most of the loss was caused by careless handling of electrical equipment by 
employes of other various departments. 

Respect Electricity 

Don't Tamper With It 

Observe the following list of "DON'TS" and you will be helping to 
eliminate the fire waste: 

Don't start electrically driven machinery unless you have been thoroughly 
instructed in its use. 

Don't use fuses larger than 6 or 10 ampere sizes in lighting circuits. 

Don't hang extension cords on nails, hooks, steam pipes or other metal 
substances. 

Don't use electric cords in damp places unless you have a waterproof 
cord approved by the Electrical Department. 

Don't use electric portable lamps near inflammable material unless they 
are protected by wire guards. 

Don't tamper with wiring. It is forbidden by a general order of the 
Insurance and Fire Prevention Departments. 

Don't fail to report, without delay, any electrical defects you may note. 

SUPERVISOR FIRE PREVENTION 



Going Over the Falls 
in a Barrel 




involves a risk that few would take. Yet every 
day thousands not only expose themselves to 
dangers as great, but jeopardize others by fail- 
ing to observe the simple rules of Safety First. 

^ The fellow that practices Safety First has a head 
on him and his believing in it is going to do a lot 
towards helping him keep his head. 



^ Never try to beat a car to the crossing; there might 
be a slip and it is sure that the car won't be the one 
to do it. 



^ Open holes are not left for people to fall into, but some 
people seem to think so. 

^ Did you ever see a fellow who got hurt by his own care- 
lessness who felt proud for having done so? 

^ It might be true that accidents will happen, but that does 
not give any one the right to make them happen. 

^ Safety First has saved many a family the price of a tombstone. 



2 



Echoes of the Third Liberty Loan Drive 
on The Baltimore and Ohio 




IN the Baltimore Division one of 
the most enthusiastic workers 
was engineer E. G. Barling, who 
' proved himself a real salesman. 



In the vicinity of Locust Point and River- 
side he secured subscriptions to the 
amount of $9,000. Added to subscriptions 
he obtained in a previous sale his total to 
date is $20,000. The 1148, his engine, 
attracted considerable attention in South 
Baltimore. The cab bore this legend, 
''Bonds Sold Here," and on the tank 
was inscribed, ''This Crew Has Bought 
Liberty Bonds — Have You?" American 
flags and posters were used in the dec- 
orative scheme. 

Cumberland Division 

C. E. Sirbaugh, a car shop employe 
of the Cumberland Division, is some Lib- 
erty bond seller. On the second Liberty 
Loan he sold $10,000 in two and a half 
days and got his picture in the Maga- 
zine, but he has now grown a mus- 
tache and he had a picture made with his 




KNCJINKEIl E. (;. FiAKMNCJ 







m 






r 



C. E. SIRBAUGH 



facial adornment and worked so hard 
selling third Liberty bonds and solicit- 
ing for the Red Cross we thought we 
would send his new picture in. 

He sold $50,800 worth of the third 
issue of Liberty bonds. This county's 
quota for the Red Cross was $1,500 
and Sirbaugh got more than that himself. 
He is the champion long distance Lib- 
erty bond seller and Red Cross solicitor. 

Connellsville Division 

Supeiintendent Broughtoii offered 
piizes of a $5.00 "Thrift Book" to the 
trainmasUu' sending in applications for 
the most Liberty bonds; also one to 
the track supervisoi" sending in the 
most applications and one to the lady 
(^mployc; sending in the most applica- 
tions. The contest startcMl immediately, 



■60 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



31 



rivalry reigning supreme and everyone 
went to work with a vigor and determina- 
tion which has seldom if ever been 
excelled. As the days went on the 
campaign grew warmer; the results, 
however, were very gratifying and all 
that could be desired, as nearly every 
employe on the division, of which there 
are about 3,500, bought bonds and 
there was no one but what was solicited 
many times. The division accountant's 
office reported a total of 3,247 employes 
as buying bonds. The contest closed 
Saturday evening with the following 
high records: Of the girls. Miss N. R. 
Coughenour was the highest, with a 
total of $24,100. Miss Coughenour is 
a clerk in the master mechanic's office. 
Miss Mary Hart was second,, with a total 
of $18,850. Mis? Hart is a clerk in the 
car distributer's office. Miss Blanche 
Stafford, a stenographer in the master 
mechanic's office, was third, with $12,550. 
All of the girls worked hard and were 




THREE SHOTS AT THE "KAISER" 
FOR TEN CENTS 



untiring in their efforts, the rest of 
them ranged from $3,000 to $7,000 
each. In appreciation of their efforts, 
superintendent Broughton has given 
a one-pound box of candy to each of 
those turning in applications. They are 
all commended for their untiring efforts 
in this worthy cause. 

Of the trainmasters, W. S. Toomey 
turned in $35,800, winning the prize; 
E. C. McClelland, of Somerset, was a 
close second, with $34,000 to his credit; 
J. S. Gilmore was third, with $17,300, and 
A. E. McVicker was fourth, with $6,300. 
Being of a tender disposition and philan- 
thropic frame of mind he is accused of 
helping the ladies rather than himself. 
Of the supervisors, W. H. Metzgar was 
the winner, with $14,550 to his credit, 
with L. R. Atkins, assistant supervisor 
at Rockwood, and A. E. Dwire, super- 
visor at Somerset, only a nose behind 
him. 

The total amount of third Liberty 
bonds bought by employes on the Con- 
nellsville Division follows: $207,310 by 
deductions from payroll; $18,790 by 
cash through the superintendent, and 
$51,050 purchased for cash by employes 
as reported by cashiers of the various 
banks, making a grand total of $277,150. 
Who said the employes of the Connells- 
ville Division were not patriotic? 

Supervisor Hanna at Rockwood, su- 
pervisor Metzgar at Connellsville and 
supervisor Dwire at Somerset report 
their employes as 100 per cent. Super- 
intendent's office and all of the offices 
in the depot, together with the agent's 
office force, also 100 per cent. 

The yards, shop and roundhouse all 
did fine, being close to 100 per cent. 
This amounts to about $82.00 per capita 
for the employes of the Connellsville 
Division. 

General superintendent J. F. Keegan 
offered to the division in the Pennsyl- 
vania District that sold most third 
Liberty Loan bonds a Liberty flag. It is 
very gratifying to know that when the 
flag is released it will be sent to the 
Connellsville Division. 

In these days when we hear so much 
about the atrocities that have been com- 
mitted in the name of the Kaiser, who 



32 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



wouldn't give a paltry dime for three shots 
at his effigy? Thomas B. Bracken, sec- 
tion foreman at Manila, Pa., fashioned a 
figure of His Imperial Majesty out of a 
condemned cross tie and erected it at 
a Red Cross social held in his neighbor- 
hood. Ten cents was the cost of the 
privilege of aiming three baseballs at 
the chief of the Huns. The surprisingly 
large sum of $126 was realized and all 
who took a pot at the fiendish counte- 
nance felt better after he had thrown 
the last ball. 

Mr. Bracken's object was to boost the 
Third Liberty Loan and, apparently, 
his efforts met with much success. He 
has the effigy still in his possession, but 
it is not the proud, arrogant Kaiser 
that he had fashioned. It is a badly 
bruised and battered figure. 

Mr. Bracken is an ardent patriot and 
has been an indefatigable worker in the 
interest of the various Liberty Loan 
drives. While he was successful in rais- 
ing a large sum in both of the first two 
campaigns, he attacked the problem more 
vigorously during the last drive and was 
instrumental in raising $3,500 among 
the gang of which he has charge. We are 
inclined to believe that no other section 
foreman on the System can boast of this 
record, comparatively speaking, of course. 



Ohio Division 

The goal set for the third Liberty 
Loan subscription on the Ohio Division 
was $150,000. Well, we got that and 
more, going ''over the top" with a sub- 
scription aggregating $165,000. This was 
accomplished by the cooperation of offi- 
cials and employes alike. Much en- 
thusiasm was manifested when a special 
train, decorated for the occasion, and 
occupied by superintendent Hoffman 
and other division officials, was run over 
the division for the purpose of solicit- 
ing subscriptions. Employes along the 
line responded nobly and the subscrip- 
tions rolled in by wire, mail and tele- 
phone, keeping the tabulators busy. As 
division operator Plumly so aptly puts 
it, 'This is the kind of spirit that will 
help send the Kaiser to a place spelled 
with four letters, singing, 'I will be gone 
for a long, long time.' " 

At Guysville there was much enthu- 
siasm manifested by the citizens in the 
third Liberty Loan special train. A 
large number of the residents and bus- 
iness men turned out and through the 
energetic efforts of our agent, H. J. 
Geisendorfer, subscriptions were obtained 
from private sources to the amount of 
$2,500. The subscribers made special 
request that their applications for bonds 




"LIBERTY LOAN SPECIAL" ON THE ILLINOIS DIVISION 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



33 



he made through the raih'oad company 
and the cash was deposited and the agent 
sent it with apphcations to the treasurer 
at Baltimore. Mr. Geisendorfer deserves 
much credit for the good work. Much 
good was accomphshed by the special at 
towns and villages along the line, where 
they induced citizens to buy Liberty bonds 
to help win the war. 

Indiana Division 

The employes on the Indiana Divi- 
sion maintained their reputation of 
patriotism in the third Liberty Loan 
and the following percentage subscribed: 
Transportation Department, 95 per cent.; 
Motive Power Department, 95 per cent. ; 
Maintenance of Way Department 92 
per cent. 

Illinois Division 

The third Liberty Loan drive on the 
Illinois Division was a grand success 
and there were but a few who failed to 
subscribe for at least one bond. Super- 
intendent Stevens and the other divi- 
sion officials are exceedingly pleased 
with the loyalty shown by the employes. 

The photograph on the opposite page 
is that of the third Liberty Loan special 
run over the division near the close of the 
drive in order to give every employe 
an opportunity to subscribe, to also 
explain the necessity of purchasing to 
those hesitating and to encourage the 
doubtful ones. Reading from left to 
right ar^: engineer J. Pope, fireman P. 
Nancy, conductor C. Blackburn, flag- 
man O. L. Cramer, master carpenter 
H. E. Orr, rehef agent C. S. Everett, 
division accountant P. H. Groscup, su- 
pervisor W. G. Burns, division engineer 
R. E. Chamberlain, agent, Springfield, 
T. T. Long, traveling auditor A. L. 
Carney, superintendent C. G. Stevens, 
division operator M. A. McCarthy, 
trainmaster K. S. Pritchett, road fore- 
man of engines C. H. Creager, master 
mechanic W. F. Harris and district 
passenger agent N. J. Neer. This spe- 
cial was a great aid in bringing the 
Illinois Division subscriptions to the 
high per cent, obtained. 

The total subscriptions taken by 
employes through the Company was 
$120,000 and through the banks was 



$55,700, making a total subscription 
for the Illinois Division of $175,700. 
With approximately 3,000 employes thei'e 
were 2,588 who purchased bonds. Some 
who failed to take third bonds had ob- 
ligated themselves to the fullest extent 
on bonds of the first and second issues. 
Individual subscriptions ranged from 
$2,350 to $50. 

Toledo Division 

The third Liberty Loan special of 
Toledo Division surely gave gratifying 
results, brought about by a most stren- 
uous campaign, the forces of which were 
well organized. The train left Dayton, 
Ohio, on Monday, April 29, and closed 
the campaign when it returned to Day- 
ton at midnight of May 4. Superin- 
tendent Mann was in charge personally. 
The entire staff was pressed into line 
of action, each officer accompanying 
the train over his assigned territory, 
and then instructed to retire, until the 
train should again enter his domain. 

* Chicago Division 

On Saturday afternoon, April 27, 
a third Liberty Loan parade was held 
in Garrett to celebrate our ''going over 
the top," by 200 per cent. The parade 
was, without a doubt, the largest demon- 
stration of its kind ever held in this part 
of the state, and was headed by super- 
intendent Jackson, members of hi? staff 
and city officials. The floats were beau- 
tiful and the amount of work put on them 
was remarkable. 

While the procession had numerous 
features, nothing was more striking 
than the 100 per cent, banners on the 
floats representing the various depart- 
ments of the railroad. 

Among the floats that attracted par- 
ticular attention was a huge British 
tank, constructed by the machine shop 
employes, which was an exact repro- 
duction of the real thing. This, to- 
gether with a large cannon on a truck, 
constructed by the boiler shop employes, 
furnished the shocks that made people 
think they were ^ 'over there" as they 
had constructed them so they would 
shoot, and they certainly did plenty of it. 

The ''hanging of the Kaiser" was of 
unusual interest to everyone, and con- 



34 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




STORES DEPARTMENT FLOAT IN PARADE AT GARRETT, IND. 



templation of such a situation in real 
life seemed to please the people along 
the line of march. The man posing as 
the Kaiser was as perfect an image of his 
R. H. as we have ever seen. In fact, he 
looked so much like '^Bill" that many 
of the people in charge of the parade 
were a little uneasy for fear someone 
might lose their head and take a pot 
shot at him. 

The office forces were well represented, 
displaying a 100 per cent, banner. The 
car department float carried Uncle Sam 
and Columbia. The cab and tank shop 
had an army field kitchen car. The 
night roundhouse force had an airplane 
built on a bicycle. The stores depart- 
ment had an automobile made into a 
locomotive. The same department also 
had a float carrying a base hospital. 
An armored car was made })y employes 
of the tin shop and look(id hke the real 
thing. Another float that was very 
good was one from the blacksmith shop, 
a typical blacksmith shop on a float, 
with a blacksmith and his helper re- 
pairing a locomotive. Employes of the 
lumber yard, all colored men, had their 



float, and displayed the 100 per cent, 
banner. Some of the Baltimore and 
Ohio office girls carried a large American 
flag, in which they received $31.00 
for the Red Cross. 

Immediately after the parade speeches 
were delivered, one of the speakers being 
W. W. Wood, of Baltimore. Mayor 
Clevenger presided and in his introduc- 
tory remarks expressed with enthusiasm 
his pride and that of the city in the re- 
markable demonstration. He praised the 
Baltimore and Ohio employes for having 
responded to the country's call for money 
to a greater degree than any other class 
of people in Garrett. 

Mr. Wood severely arraigned the 
German government for its autocratic 
methods. He explained the vast differ- 
ence between an autocracy and democ- 
racy. He said we should support the 
President with all of our force, because 
force is the only argument that the Kaiser 
can understand. He is often asked 
how long the war will last and he an- 
swers that it will not end ''until we lick 
'em, when the Allies meet in Berlin and 
Hobenzollernism is cmshed." 



Belgians Employed at Timber 
Preservation Plant are Doing 
Their Bit for Native Land and 
Uncle Sam 



D 



EVASTATED, depopulated and 
impoverished Belgium has a true 
son here in the person of Sergeant 
Albert Van den Dreissche, who 
was formerly employed on the Baltimore 
and Ohio System as a helper and extra 
timber treating engineer at Green Spring, 
W. Va., and who is now a member of the 
251st Aero Squadron, Aviation Corps, 
Fort Sill, Okla. Although he is married 
and has two children, he went into what is 
possibly the most hazardous branch of 
Uncle Sam's fighting forces, and is now 
eagerly awaiting the call to go overseas to 
help bring down some of the boches who 
are bombing allied hospitals. 

Sergeant Van den Dreissche enlisted in 
the aviation corps at Cumberland, Md., 
November 26, 1917. 
He was born in 
Caprycke, Belgium, 
April 15, 1877, and 
is a graduate of a 
military school of his 
native land. During 
the period of his 
studies at the 
academy he was pro- 
moted to the rank 
of brigadier. 

The Van den 
Dreissche family has 
proved its loyalty to 
its adopted country 
—more patriotic, per- 
haps, than some who 
have been born 
under the Stars and 
Stripes. Mrs. Mary 
Van den Dreissche, 
wife of Sergeant Van 
den Dreissche, has. 




SERGEANT VAN DEN DREISSCHE 
AND FAMILY 



through the Company, purchased several 
Liberty bonds of the third issue, paying 
cash for each. Besides, their son Gaston, 
who is in the Company's service at the 
Green Spring, W. Va., plant, is not only 
satisfied with paying the rent of the 
cottage in which the family lives and 
which is owned by the Baltimore and 
Ohio, but is also continuing his father's 
relief insurance with the Company and is 
buying a Liberty bond. He is an active 
member of the Boy Scouts, and is an 
enthusiastic American. 

This is a fine show of patriotism on the 
part of the family. The bread-winner 
has gone into the service to face death: 
the wife has invested the family's savings 
in Liberty bonds, while the young son is 
doing a man's share. 
Certainly, America 
might well welcome 
to these shores such 
loyal foreign - borns 
as are these Belgian 
people. They have 
proved themselves 
worthy citizens and 
Uncle Sam is proud 
of them. Every one 
in the Company's 
service should feel 
inspired by their 
acts. 

May they see the 
day in the not far- 
distant future when 
their native flag will 
be flying triumphant- 
ly over the forts 
which were ruthlessly 
laid in ruins by the 
Krupp guns. 



35 



Employes in Baltimore Give Liberally to 
Second Red Cross War Fund 



HE recent drive for contributions 
to the Second Red Cross War 
Fund from the officers and em- 
ployes of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company in Baltimore amount- 
ed to $13,873.10. This response to the 
appeals of the Red Cross for funds once 
more demonstrates the loyalty and patri- 
otism of our employes (who can always 
be counted upon to give as liberally as 
circumstances will permit); especially is 
this the case in regard to the employes 
at Mt. Clare shops, who contributed nearly 
fifty per cent, of the total amount given, 
while numbering twenty-six per cent, of 
the employes in Baltimore. 

This fund was delivered to Red Cross 
headquarters by J. S. Murray, chair- 
man, who desires to take this opportu- 
nity to personally thank the various 
committees for their cooperation and 
assistance in bringing this campaign 
to such a successful conclusion. 

Mr. Murray wishes also to call the 
attention of those employes who have 
signed pledge cards, that it would great- 
ly assist the Campaign Committee if 
remittances were promptly sent by them 
to Red Cross headquarters at 17 South 
Street, Baltimore, Md. The payments 
are due July 1, August 1, September 1 
and October 1. Checks should be made 
payal)le to ''Second Red Cross War 
Fund." 

Th(! following table shows in detail the 
contiibutions made by the different 
departments : 

Dkpautmknt 'J'otal, 

Prosidnnt's Office $1,050.00 

A(rc()untinK Vice President's Office 

(Jomptroller's Office 

(General Auditor's Office 

Auditor Subsidiary Lines' Office. . ( '^^'"^'^^^ 
Auditor of f^iKhursernenl 's Offi(;e.. I 
.Special Accountant's Office J 



Depautment Total 

Auditor of Freight Claims $662.35 

Auditor of Revenue 95.00 

Auditor of Merchandise Receipts. . . 874.50 

Auditor of Coal and Coke Receipts. 318.00 

Auditor of Passenger Receipts 397.00 

Operating Vice-President's Office. . . 255.00 

Traffic Vice-President's Office 80.00 

Law 57.00 

Tax 13.00 

Purchasing Agent 277.00 

General Storekeeper 9.00 

Engineering 254.00 

Valuation 132.00 

Commercial Development 86.00 

Dining Car 87.00 

Signal Engineer 14.00 

General Superintendent Transpor- 
tation 235.00 

Car Service 212.00 

Engineer Maintenance of Way 30.00 

Real Estate Agent 30.00 

Foreign Freight Agent 18.00 

General Superintendent of Motive 

Power 311.00 

Treasury 51.00 

Electrical 25.00 

Freight 69.00 

Superintendent of Motive Power. . . . 15.00 

Telegraph 124.00 

Relief 144.00 

Freight Tariff 138.00 

Paymaster 13.00 

General Superintendent of Police — 27.00 

Secretary's Office 10.00 

Mount Clare 6,409.25 

Printing Shop, Mt. Clare 91.00 

Superintendent Timber Preservation 79.00 

Agent, Locust Point 218.00 

Superintendent, Baltimore Division. 139.00 
Motive Power Department, Locust 

Point 160.00 

Master Mechanic, Riverside 37.00 

Agent, Curtis Bay 44.00 

Motive Power Department, Bay 

View 45.00 

Miscclhmcous 36.00 

Total $13,873.10 



**That these dead shall not have 
died in vain.** — Lincoln. 




30 



A Big Man Who Does Big Things 

By W. E. Buckmaster 

Electrician, Lincoln Street, Chicago 



iALTIMORE and Ohio men, per- 
mit us to present Colonel Frank 
E. Lamphere, ''The Man Who 
Built Camp Taylor/' and the 
man who is making history in army con- 
struction at Port Newark, N. J. one of 

the greatest 

ports on the 
Atlantic coast. 
The colonel — a 
major when he 
constructed 
Camp Taylor, 
Louisville, Ky., 
— received his 
new commis- 
sion on March 
21, and the 
fact that he 
was advanced 
two grades on 
one commission 
is a signal trib- 
ute to his abili- 
ty. The work 
accomplished 
by Colonel 
Lamphere at 
Camp Taylor 
was set forth in 
an article in the 
October, 1917, 
issue of the 
Magazine. It 
was the first of 
the sixteen can- 
tonments for 
the National 
Army to be 
completed and 
in performing 
this prodigious 
task a number 
of Baltimore 
and Ohio men 
from the Chicago Division played a 
prominent part. They were selected 
by Colonel Lamphere because of their 
fitness. They started out by setting 




COLONEL FRANK E. LAMPHERE 



the pace for cantonment construction 
and went ''over the top" in fine shape. 

Colonel Lamphere entered the service 
of the Chicago Terminal Transfer Rail- 
road (now a part of the Baltimore and 
Ohio System) in 1904 as a draftsman 

in the Engi- 
neering De- 
partment. In 
1906 he was 
made assistant 
engineer, in 
charge of track 
elevation work, 
remaining in 
charge of this 
work until re- 
ceiving his 
commission of 
major in the 
Quartermaster 
Department of 
the army on 
June 1, 1917. 
To those fa- 
miliar with the 
Chicago Ter- 
minal situation 
the magnitude 
of the work un- 
der his charge, 
while assistant 
engineer, is at 
once apparent. 

We would 
like to quote 
some figures we 
have as to what 
the Colonel's 
work at Port 
Newark in- 
volves, but it 
is sufficient to 
say that it is 
equivalent to 
building a terminal railroad complete, 
with all dock and warehouse facilities. 

Baltimore and Ohio men are winning 
their spurs in their government's service. 

37 



BASKBALL TROPIIIKS FOR 1918 SEASON 
Upper— PrcHidrmt Willard'fi Cup to bo .awarded tho ClmrnpionHhip Tram of the SyHtom. 
Lf!ft — Ocnora) ManaK' r Hcnion'rf Cup for the diarnpion toam of I'Jastei n lines. 
Ri(?lit — Fedfral Manager Calloway'H f 'up for the eharripion teann of Westorn lines. 

Mf>ttorn— Fedeia! Manager ThoiripHon'H Cliallenge Cup to be awarded the throe times champions of tlie Baltimore and Ohio 
Sy.stem. 

38 



Each Divisional Baseball Team a 
Nucleus for an Employes' Club 

The following extract from vice-president Thompson's address at the Labor 
Day Championship Baseball contest in Baltimore, in 1916, speaks volumes: 

"In carrying on the welfare work we are only following one of the policies 
of our good president, Mr. Willard, in encouraging clean sports, clean thoughts 
''nd clean work, and the result which we hope and expect to attain is, that the 
Baltimore and Ohio will be the best road in the country for its employes. It 
is evident that we are making some strides in this direction with respect to 
the Baltimore and Ohio family, when our baseball clubs can furnish so much 
genuine enjoyment to so many of us whose well-being is so closely identified 
with the Company. 

"We all know that a healthy man is a happy man and, therefore, that 
anything which promotes the physical well-being of our men will go a long way 
toward bringing about the solid comfort and satisfaction which the Baltimore 
and Ohio wants in the life and home of every one of its employes. And this 
ball game, with all its spontaneity, color and enjoyment, is but one manifes- 
tation of what the Company is doing to bring this about. It is only a single 
delightful expression of the larger program which we expect to work out 
successfully under the direction of our Welfare Bureau." 

The physical well-being of the worker and the soldier is the chief asset of 
the nation, recognized now as never before. This asset the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad wants to capitalize in the interests of employe and Company. 

Each divisional baseball team will make a splendid nucleus for an athletic 
and social club. And we can organize the finest association of clubs in this 
country, if we but get together on the proposition at once. Indoor, as well as 
outdoor sports, can readily be developed. Bowling, handball, quoits, tennis, 
volleyball, running teams (cross-country, relay, marathon and dashes), throw- 
ing the hammer and discus, putting the shot, the broad and high jump, pole 
vaulting, etc., offer a variety of recreation and healthful exercise in which every 
employe can have a part. It is hardly too much to say that if every employe 
were interested and actively participating in some kind of sport, we would be 
the healthiest and happiest body of men in the world. And that is an ideal 
well worth aiming for. 

Don't wait for someone else to start your club. Be among the leaders. 
Encourage your superintendent to quick action by telling him how interested 
you would be in such an association. See his chief clerk about it and get 
something substantial moving right away. 

The magnitude, inspiring development and brilliant features, coupled 
with the interest, enthusiasm and success accorded the inauguration of our 
System-wide baseball league, is conclusive proof of the importance and value 
of such features of welfare activities among our employes. The management's 
sanction and approval in such matters should prove an incentive to engage 
the successful cooperation of every employe. Have we yours ? 

WELFARE BUREAU. 



40 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



□ □ 

no 



8 s 

1 i 

If 

!i 
I! 

□ □. 

□ □' 



Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine 



Frank A. O'Connell, Editor 
Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist 
George B. Lucre y, Staff Photographer 



□ □ 

□ □ 



I j 

! ! 

It 
!! 

i i 



June-July Issue 

N this number of the Magazine, 
as you have noted, we have con- 
soUdated the June and July 
issues. The purpose of this is 
to have the Magazine reach you at the 
beginning of the month it is dated. In 
other words, you will receive the August 
issue on or before August 1 and not 
during the latter part of the month or 
the beginning of the following month, as 
would have been the case had we con- 
tinued under the old arrangement. We 
feel that the move will stimulate interest 
in the Magazine for the very good 
reason that in the future every employe 
will know just when to expect it. In 
order to obtain the desired results, it 
will be necessary for ''copy" to reach 
this office at an earlier date. All cor- 
respondents should make a special effort 
to have their notes, with accompanying 
photographs, in this office not later than 
the twentieth of the month. Go to it! 



A Bushel Means a Soldier 

I 1^ l( ) YOU know that every bushel of 
I mJ j wheat now saved means the 
iSGn support of a soldier on the battle 
line until the next harvest? As 
no soldier can live without food, every 
bushel of wheat is the actual equivalent 
of a fighting unit. The moral is clear. 
We must supply soldiers. But it is use- 
less to supply the fighters themselves 
unless we can also supply the where- 
withal upon which the soldier lives. The 
number of men we can put in the field is 
in direct relation to the number of men 
we can feed in the field. Will YOU 
support a soldier until the next harvest? 
□ □ 

War Substitutes 

Economy for Waste. 
Cooperation for Criticism. 
Knowledge of Prices for Gossip about 
Profits. 

Cornmeal and Oatmeal for W^heat 
Flour. 

Fish for Beef and Bacon. 
Vegetable Oil for Animal Fats. 
The Garden Hoe for the Golf Stick. 
Performance for Argument. 
Service for Sneers. 

Patriotic Push for Peevish Puerilities. 
Perishable for Preservable Foods. 
Greater Production for a German 
Peace. 

The Beef You Do Not Eat for the 
Rifle You Can Not Carry. 

Conservation for Conversation. 
Common Sense for Common Gossip. 
Marketing for Telephoning. 
Production for Pessimism. 

— Canadian Food Bulletin 



AU REVOIR! 

OWING to ill health I am forced to ask for a furlough a,s Editor of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Employes Magazine. I am going back to nature and do my "darndest" 
to get well. Here in Maryland we have a Compulsory Work Law and if you hear 
of my being "pinched" for violating said law don't be shocked. 

William F. Braden, for a number of years connected with the editorial staff of 
The Sun (Baltimore), becomes Editor of the Magazine, beginning with the August 
number. Give him the same "glad hand" and whole-hearted cooperation you accorded 
me and he will have no "kick" coming. 

FRANK A. O'CONNELL. 



,. — ^ 



OUTFITTING AN ARMY 
WITH THRIFT STAMPS 

laatocaanaaaDOcaiiacvnaaaaawuc 
jinnmimamtiiiiiiMOiiiiiiiniriaiiimiiiiriaimiitiiriiainmiiiiiiniiiiHiinirQiimiimnn 

One Thrift Stamp buys one waist belt or one hat cord, two pairs 
of shoe laces and four identification tags. 

Two Thrift Stamps buy one trench tool. 

Three Thrift Stamps buy one pair of woolen gloves. 

Four Thrift Stamps buy one bedsack, and 1 1 cents over, or one 
pair of canvas leggings. 

Five Thrift Stamps buy one bayonet scabbard. 

Six Thrift Stamps buy a summer undershirt or woolen stockings. 

Seven Thrift Stamps buy a service hat. 

Eight Thrift Stamps leave 1 5 cents lacking to buy a bayonet. 
Twelve Thrift Stamps buy a shelter tent or one steel helmet. 
Fourteen Thrift Stamps buy a poncho. 

Fifteen Thrift Stamps buy a winter undershirt or undergarments. 
One War Savings Stamp buys a cartridge belt. 
One War Savings and four Thrift Stamps buy 100 cartridges. 
Two War Savings Stamps buy a woolen shirt or 0. D. Breeches. 
Three War Savings Stamps buy two pairs of shoes or a gas mask. 
Four War Savings Stamps buy 0. D. coats or woolen blankets. 
Five War Savings Stamps buy a rifle. 

Thirty-eight War Savings Stamps equip a soldier completely. 



Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of May, 1918, and to whom 
pensions have been granted: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Balik, Franc 

Bowles, Josephus. . . 

Brown, Michael 

Canfield, Michael H. 
Hitesman, William . . 
Snyder, James L. . . . 

Steele, Robert 

Sutor, Paul L 

Wright, Jeremiah B. . 



Blacksmith 

Crossing Watchman. 

Engineer 

Conductor 

Crossing Watchman. 

Agent 

Tinner 

Train Baggageman. . 
Gang Foreman 



M. P. . . 
M. of W 
C. T.. .. 
C. T. .. 
C. T.... 
C. T.... 
M. P. . . 
C. T. .. 
M. of W 



Cleveland . . . 
Baltimore . . . 

Ohio 

Cleveland . . . 

Indiana 

Connellsville 
Baltimore . . . 

Newark 

Cumberland. 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1917, over $312,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 
those who had been honorably retired. " 

The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,375,409.75. 



After having served the Company faithfully for a number ot years, the following employe 
has died: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



Griffin, John Engine Wiper 



DEPART- 
MENT 



M. P. 



DIVISION 



DATE OF 
DEATH 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Ohio May 14, 1918. j 



49 




Home Dressmaker's 
Corner 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review 




An Attractive Costume for Youthful Figures, 
Distinctive for its Simplicity 



HNE is irresistibly attracted by the 
simple frocks fashioned of scrim 
and cotton voile, because their 
colorings are delightful, reflecting 
the shades of the highest-priced fabrics. 
This youthful dress in old rose scrim has 




7730 

AN IRRESISTIBLE VOILE 



a gathered skirt and waist with open 
front. The material is self-checked and 
the touch of black embroidery on the belt 
and pockets, with an additional band of 
black on either end of the collar, stamps 
the model as truly Parisian. Medium 
size requires 53^ yards 36-inch material. 



The absence 
skirt simplifies 



of many seams in the 
its cutting greatly 



as 



CONSTRUCTION GUIDE 7T30 



bLEE-VE 




the guide will show. The front and 
back gore sections of the pattern are 
laid on the scrim so that the triple 
'TTT" perforations rest along the length- 
wise fold. With the exception of the 
back and vest, all of the sections of the 
waist are so placed on the material that 
the large ''O" perforations rest on a 



43 



44 



THE BALTIMORE AND 0?IIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



CLrrriNOciiDE 7730 sum^g Sii>. 16 



.RONT GORt L y ^^^^ 
. EiJ B LU . p. 

lengthwise thread. The tuck may be 
omitted in the skirt if preferred. 

The first seams to be closed are the 
imder-arm and shoulder seams. Then 
turn upper edge of vest under on small 
''o" perforations. Adjust vest to posi- 
tion underneath front, matching the single 
small ''o" and single large "o" perfo- 
rations; tack the right side to position 
and finish the left for closing. Gather 
lower edge of waist l^etween 'T" perfo- 
rations and 1 inch above. Adjust stay 
under gathers with center-fronts and 
center-backs even (single large ''O" 
perforation indicates center-front of 
stay) ; bring small ''o" perforation in stay 
to under-arm seam and bring front edge 
of front to double small ^'oo" perforation 
in stay. 

Close the back seam of the collar, 
line and sew to neck edge of back and 
to the front with notches and center- 
backs even. Then take the sleeve and 
close seam as notched, also cuff seam. 
Finish edges below the ''o" perfora- 
tions for closing. Sew cuff to lower 
edge of sleeve with notches and edges 
even. Sew sleeve to armhole as notched 
with small *'o" perforation at shoulder 
seam, easing in any fulness between the 
notches. Hold the sleeve toward you 
when })asting it in armhole. 




Join gores of skirt as notched, leaving 
left side seam free above lower large 
"O" perforation in front gore and finish 
for closing. Form a tuck creasing 
on crossline of shot perforations; stitch 
4 inches from folded edge. Gather up- 
per edge of skirt between 'T" perfora- 
tions. Adjust skirt to position on waist 
with upper edge along upper row of 
gathers in waist, with center-fronts 
and center-backs even; bring side seam 
to under-arm seam. Leave skirt free 
from center-front to left side-seam, draw 
gathers to the required size; stitch tape 
under gathers or bind the edge. 

Adjust pocket to position on skirt 
with outer edges between indicating 
small ''o" perforations in front and 
back gores. 

Turn one end of belt under on small 
''o" perforations and tack. Arrange 
around the waist with center of belt 
over joining of waist and skirt; lap to 
small ''o" perforations with edges undei- 
neath even and close at left side. 

More than one color may be intro- 
duced in the embroidery with fashion- 
able effect. 

Pictorial Review ^Costvm^ No. 7730. Sizes, 
14 to 20 years. Price, 20 cents. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale at local 
dealers. 



Frocks Fashioned From Fabrics Costing Less 
Than Half-Dollar a Yard 

By Maude Hall 



iHE woman who can make one 
dollar do the work of two for her 
wardrobe whcm she scarcely can 
make two dollars do the work of 
on(! for the market basket in these days 
of war, is a marvel. Yet being well- 
dressed was never much a mattc^r of 
taste, rather than exfxmse, as now. 
'fhe shops abound in dninty fabri(;s 



costing less than a half dollar a yard- 
which may be fashioned into frocks 
stunning enough to be worn on any 
occasion. Now that peculiar stress is 
so laid upon all-day dresses one must 
have more than two or three and the 
thought that attractive materials and 
trinur)ings may be had at reasona})le 
cost is comforting, to say the least. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



45 



Wonderful things are done with ging- 
ham, marquisette, scrim, the cotton 
voiles and foulard substitutes. The ma- 
jority of these fabrics are at least thirty 
inches wide, while many are thirty-six 
inches in width, so that with the narrow 
skirts and simple bodices, it is not difficult 
to get a really fascinating frock out of 
six yards or less. 

Women who go in for gay garmenture 
will delight in the new ginghams, which 
come in shepherd plaid effects. These 
perennially popular plaids are acceptable 
in any material and it is surprising what 
effective little bolero and skirt costumes 
they make. One strikingly pretty model 
carries out the decorative scheme of the 
woollen plaids in that it is bound with 
black braid, the braid in this instance 
being mercerized cotton instead of silk, 
as when it adorns silks and woollens. 
The skirt is gathered under a two-fold 
belt of self-material, the lower edge 
being stitched with braid. The bolero, 
first cousin to the Eton jacket, is also 
outlined with braid and falls to the 
top of the belt, the fronts falhng apart 
to show a blouse of soft white batiste. 
The sleeves are of the flowing type, 
bound with black mercerized cotton 
braid and faced with white batiste, to 
correspond with the collar. 

A number of semi-tailored costumes 
in pique, cotton gabardine and like 
fabrics are shown among the sum- 
mer fashions and they are unusually 
attractive. One model has the little 
jacket built with unusual cleverness, 
with narrow braid and buttons on either 
side of the front. The inserted pockets 
have pointed flaps stitched with white 
braid and the collar is of self-material. 
Under the jacket is worn a blouse trim- 
med with embroidery. A straight skirt, 
finished with a deep hem and gathered 
at the top, under a narrow belt, accom- 
panies the jacket. 

Sometimes, in fact quite frequently, 
a frock appears which indulges in a 
marked but decidedly engaging one- 
sidedness. A check cotton voile with 
floral sprays woven into the intersecting 
blocks to give it novelty, is a perfect 
example of this modish divergence from 
the straight and narrow path. The 



tunic is much shorter on one side of the 
skirt than on the other and the fronts of 
the blouse wind ai'ound the waist to be 
tied at the back so that one end hangs 
longer than the other. The long nar- 
row collar of white batiste fastens at 
one side and the sleeves, flowing of 
course, have cuffs to correspond with the 
collar. 

Delightful dresses for the summer fes- 
tivities are being constructed of figured 
dimities and — who would believe it? — 
old-fashioned calicoes! Indeed, if one 
be inclined toward extravagance, it will 
be an easy matter to go above the half- 
dollar mark in purchasing a calico frock, 
for some of the newest designs, made 
more valuable because of the difficulty 
in importing them bear a striking resem- 
blance to the delicious French cretonnes 
and English prints. One dainty model 
has the foundation skirt made of plain 
pink organdy, the tunic being of figured 
material trimmed with insertion. The 
waist is a model of simplicity, with flow- 
ing sleeves and a long barrow collar of 
pink dimity edged with an accordion 
plaited frill of its own material. 

There are many substitutes for foulard 
and they are faithful duplicates of the 
real silk, of which there is nothing more 
stylish this season. The foulard substi- 
tutes differ one from another chiefly in 
the manner of their trimming, for most of 
them are built upon extremely simple lines. 
One of the most distinctive models yet 
seen has a plain gathered skirt attached to 
a simple waist under a belt of unfigured 
blue. From the belt, at either side of the 
back, there hang narrow panels of plain 
blue, which contrasts effectively with the 
figured material. Finishing the neck is a 
collar of white batiste, which is long and 
narrow at the front and wide and square 
at the back. The collar is hand-embroid- 
ered and has the edges finished with 
buttonholed scallops. Embroideries play 
an enormous part in the subtle and yet 
positive differences which distinguish 
lawns, as well as imitation foulards. In 
the domestic designs, many of which are 
variations of imported models, it would 
seem that originality couM go no further. 

The variety in trimming is no greater 
than in the development of sleeves, 



46 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



nearly all of which seem to boast some 
sort of trimming, regardless of their 
length. There are innumerable models 
with the cuff turned back, the depth of 
the cuff varying from a few inches to half 
the depth of the sleeve itself. Quite an 
original idea for sheer materials is a 
harmequin effect of a sleeve of two 
different things. This is noticed on a 



summer dress of white and green polka 
dotted material which has only a part of 
the sleeve made of the green stuff, the 
under part being entirely of white, which 
forms a sort of drapery and ends gathered 
like a cuff, but it is attached in the same 
fashion we see in many frocks. There is 
no cuff or hem to finish the bottom of the 
sleeve, which is picoted. 




Dainty Towels to Replenish the 
Linen Closet 

By Kathryn Mutterer 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



r iNE cannot make a tour of the 
[ V/ J shops these days without run- 
fS^fll ning acrops dainty new towels, 
for it is time to replenish the 
supply of the summer cottage. Even 
women who stay at home find it advis- 
able to add to their collection, because it is 
doubtful if they will ever have a more 
favorable opportunity to secure such 
handsome, yet simple designs. 

Of course, not all of the latest models 
arc simple, because there is the chry- 
santhemum effect illustrated. The great 
advantage about the pattern, however, 
IS the fact that the stitches require to 
develop it are those known to the veriest 
amateur. The design, in addition to 
being used to decorate a towel, is effec- 
tive for a serving table or bureau scarf. 




No. IIOO-CHRYSANTHKMUM DIvSKJN 



The scallop is given for both ends and the 
design tor one end of a towel 24 inches 
wide. The scallop is worked in but- 
tonholing and all of the design, with 
the exception of the dots in eyelet, is 
in the raised satin stitch. 

The two towels in simple effect also 
require only the simplest stitches to 
develop. The pattern supplies two each 
of the towel shown. Silk thread may be 
used in developing the design shown 
at the top, a delicate rose for the flowers 
and green for the leaves being effective. 
The center flower is worked in eyelet 
stitch, with lazy daisy stitch used for 
the remaining towel and leaves. 

The second towel may be carried 
out entirely in white or the flowers may 
be done in raised satin stitch with French 
knot centers in colors. Roman cut- 
work forms the connecting bands. 

Picforial Review Transfer Pattern No. 
11910, 15 cents. 

No. 11910. Desicjn stamped on pure linen 
liufkahack, 22 inches wide by 38 inches lonuj, 
$1.20; white embroidery cotton, 50 cents. 

Transfer Pattern No. 12439, blue, 15 cents, 
supplyin«i; two eacli of botli towels. 

Pictorial Revieir patterns on sale at local 
dealers. 




Staten Island Division 

On May 3 trainman J. Zimmer discovered 
defective equipment on engine 1181, St. George 
Yard. He stopped engine and had it repaired 
before any damage was done. Mr. Zimmer has 
been commended for his keen observance and 
prompt action. 

At 7.30 p. m., May 8, crossing watchman 
Joseph Gorman, stationed at Wave Street, dis- 
covered fire under a car on Thompson's siding, 
west of his crossing. He immediately extin- 
guished same. Had not Gorman been on the 
alert, a serious fire might have occurred. He 
is commended for his prompt action. 

While extra 1637 west was passing Mariners 
Harbor at 1.30 p. m., May 7, agent King noticed 
defective equipment on a car. He notified 
operator at Western Avenue, at which point 
train was stopped. Agent King has been com- 
mended. 

On May 13 yard conductor R. Beattie, in 
charge of engine 29, had finished loading float 
in Bridge 3 and was about to leave when he 
discovered fire in old rope pile between Bridges 
2 and 3. He immediately gave the alarm and 
rendered prompt action in extinguishing the 
fire. 

At 10.00 p. m.. May 8, John Brown, mate on 
tug George L. Potter, discovered fire near the 
sea end of Pier 8, St. George. He reported it, 
procured pails of water and extinguished the 
fire. 

On May 3 Captain C. C. Keyes, of tug Oscar 
G. Murray, while picking up barge No. 124 
from north side of Dock 6, St. George, to tow 
to Pier 4, American Docks, noticed starboard 
side planking gouged between first and second 
wearing pieces, and second and third wearing 
pieces just below starboard forward freight 
door. Captain Keyes examined it inside and 
below but could find no leak. He reported it 



to tug dispatcher upon arrival at St. George 
after placing boat at American docks. 

On May 13, about 2 p. m., crew on engine 
lying at Bridge 2 discovered fire in pile of junk 
rope. Two engines were sent from the yard 
to hold it in check until tug Baltimore could 
clear No. 2 Bridge and get stream of water on 
it. Tug Potter cleared No. 4 bridge. Mate 
Edward Taylor and mate Thomas Quigley did 
very good work in separating the junk so that 
water could get to the fire. Mate Taylor and 
mate Quigley are hereby commended for prompt 
action taken in safeguarding the Company's 
property. The management congratulated the 
employes of the marine and yard departments 
for their excellent work in connection with this 
fire. 

Philadelphia Division 

H. K. Hartman, division operator, noticed 
defective equipment on a car in extra eas^ No. 
4280 on April 25 and the train was set off at 
Leslie. The car was at the east end of Foys 
Hdl siding when defect was detected. Mr. 
Hartman's alertness is commendable. 

With the aid of a fire extinguisher Louis M. 
Miller, night station baggage agent, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., succeeded in putting out a fire that 
originated in a United States mail truck. The 
truck was standing at the loading platform of 
the baggage room. A call was sent in for the 
fire department ap- 
paratus, but the 
flames were extin- 
guished before its 
arrival. 

On April 2 7, 
while John Ga- 
bosch, machinist at 
our East Side shops, 
was making inspec- 
tion of shafting on 
the Schuylkill 




Draw Bridge, he 



LOULS M. MILLER 



47 



48 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



discovered a bad leak in a tank car containing 
gasoline. He immediately took action to have 
trouble remedied. Mr. Gabosch's prompt 
action is commended. 

On May 14 while extra west engine 4155 was 
passing west of Havre de Grace station at race 
track platform, section foreman W. P. Cook 
and his men, John Dennison, Joseph Smith and 
Russell Boyd, noticed something wrong on a 
car in the train. They promptly signaled crew 
on rear of train to stop, which was done. It 
was found that there was a defective wheel on 
the car, which was set off at Osborne, a short 
distance west. 

Cumberland Division 

At 4.03 a. m., April 23, while extra 4321 west, 
conductor Twigg, was passing Rawlings tower, 
operator R. T. McKenzie noted defect under 
fifteenth car from rear. He held the train at 
advance signal and informed the conductor. 
Mr. McKenzie has been commended for his 
watchfulness and prompt action in the matter. 

As extra 4268 west was passing Engles, May 
22, operator H. H. Chambers noticed defect 
under engine. He stopped the train and had 
trouble corrected. 

At 7.29 a. m., April 27, as extra 4152 east 
passed Rawlings, operator R. T. McKenzie 
observed defect on thirteenth car from the 
engine. Examination developed necessity of 
setting off Baltimore and Ohio car 22,300 for 
repairs. 

As extra 7123 east passed Terra Alta, April 
29, operator C. W. Michael noted shifted load 
of pipe on one of the cars near rear of train. He 
informed conductor and load was given neces- 
sary attention at Rinards. 

Monongah Division 

On May 5 brakeman J. K. Sturm, on coal 
train with conductor CofTman, stopped two 
runaway cars at Wendel Mine. The cars had 
got away from mine people and brakeman 
Sturm, noticing cars running away, jumped on 
one of them and applied the brakes. 

D. H. B. Howard, fireman on local west 2328, 
while passing along west siding "CX" tower, 
March 25, discovered several tons of stone 
which had slid on track, which he promptly 
reported to chief dispatchc^r. For his action 
to protect agairi.'st accident lie is (lommended. 
On March 10 Mr. Howard, while firing on local 



west 2277, when passing new siding at Barrack- 
ville, discovered tree lying across siding. 
He promptly reported matter to superin- 
tendent's office and for his prompt action is 
commended. 

On April 30 W. S. Robertson, section laborer, 
while sitting on the porch of his home at Flush- 
ing, Ohio, noticed a defect on gondola car in 
westbound extra as train was descending heavy 
grade from "FI" tower. He promptly notified 
flagman on train, who turned on air and stopped 
train, thus preventing damage to this car. 

Ohio River Division 

On the morning of May 11 conductor H. C. 
Bledsoe, in charge of yard engine 1227 at 
Huntington, W. Va., observed smoke coming 
from under a car in Huntington yard, and 
immediately took action to extinguish the fire. 
For his close observation and timely action 
meritorious entry has been placed upon his 
service record. 

Cleveland Division 

On April 21 while backing train in siding at 
Strasburg, Ohio, for No. 60, brakeman R. C. 
Lutz found piece of equipment at west switch 
and after inspecting train found that it was off 
car in his train. The car was immediately set 
out. He has been commended by the superin- 
tendent. 

On April 17 conductor B. S. Willmot, in charge 
of train No. 64 at Warwick, noticed defective 
equipment on a car in conductor Slates' train, 
and immediately notified conductor Slates, who 
had car set out. He has been commended by 
the superintendent for his interest and action 
taken. 

On May 17 operator E. E. Gray at "CO" tower 
discovered a defective rail near the tower and 
immediately notified supervisor, who had neces- 
sary repairs made. He has been commended. 

On May 16 brakeman H. F. Cizgen, on engine 
4318 west, train second No. 84, pulling through 
Patterson siding, discovered defective equip- 
ment on a car in his train and promptly notified 
conductor, who had the car set out. He has 
been commended. 

Connellsville Division 

On th(i morning of May 10 John Goldyio, 
Seanor, Pa., found a tree across our telegraph 
wires just east of the switch at the S. & C. Mine 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



49 



on sharp curve and walked to Foustwell, notify- 
ing the track foreman, who removed the ob- 
struction. Superintendent Broughton has ex- 
pressed his appreciation for his thoughtfulness 
and interest in the Company's welfare. 

Pittsburgh Division 

At 5.30 p. m., on May 9, two young men, 
Willard and Lemeon Cole, age fourteen and 
twelve respectively, residing at Taylorstown, 
Pa., discovered a defective rail and reported 
it to operator Gillette at Taylors>toTVTi. He 
reported defect to dispatcher. A letter of 
commendation has been sent the Cole boys. 

New Castle Division 

At 7.00 a. m., May 11, car inspector C. H. 
Shrimp discovered a defective rail in the east- 
ward main track east of Kent, Ohio. Mr. 
Shrimp left the assistant car inspector to guard 
the rail and went out to look for sectionmen to 
have it repaired. Mr. Shrimp was senc a com- 
mendatory letter by the superintendent for his 
action and promptness in reporting this broken 
rail. 

On May 21 the Erie Railroad delivered eleven 
cars on our transfer at Akron at about 2.00 p. m. 
and at 5.55 p. m. these cars ran through switch 
connection with the C. A. & C. delivery track 
over Arlington Street crossover and were for- 
tunately stopped at the foot of the hill to 
clear Hazel Siding by the prompt action of 
brakeman T. B. Mills and E. H. Gross, who 
were in their caboose car on the Pennsylvania 
Transfer, where they noticed the cars running 
away. The prompt action of these two men 
is highly commended. 

Chicago Division 

The following letter was received from super- 
intendent R. B. Mann, of the Toledo Division, 
dated April 22. ''Chicago Division brakeman 
W. D. Hazelton reported guy wire on oil derrick. 
North Baltimore, would not clear man on top of 
car. We investigated this matter and found 
his report to be correct and situation was cor- 
rected. Wish to commend brakeman Hazelton 
for his action in reporting this matter." 

On April 21 conductor S. J. Moste, while 
checking over card bills for his train, discovered 
car offered for Syracuse, billed in error as car of 
hay for Connellsville.- His close checking of 



card bills prevented long haul and delay in 
delivery of car, and for his close attention to 
these important matters he is commended. 

On March 10 while extra east, engine 4023, 
w^as passing North Baltimore, car inspector J. 
E. McCusker observed defective equipment on 
a car and immediately notified train crew. 
He had train stopped and condition corrected. 
For his prompt action he has been sent a letter 
of commendation by the superintendent. 

On March 5, engine 4323, in charge of engineer 
C. E. Hart and fireman M. E. Miller, on east- 
bound train dispatched from South Chicago, 
when passing Kimmell the crew discovered a 
defect on the engine. They made temporary 
repairs and finished their run. 

On April 5 operator W. G. Wineland, "HK" 
tower, discovered defective rail in eastbound 
track at crossing at "HK" tower. He made 
temporary repairs and then notified section- 
men, who made permanent repairs. He has 
been commended for vigilance displayed in 
this case. 

On March 20 engineer C. R. Elson, fireman 
I. I. Wise, in charge of engine 4138, dispatched 
from South Chicago, on arrival at Walkerton 
discovered a defect on their engine. With 
conductor A. W. Karr, brakeman R. R. Rob- 
inson, D. H. Carbaugh and A. F. Wise, thsy 
made repairs and brought train to terminal. 
For their interest in protection of Company's 
property and in getting trains over the road 
they ha ve been commended by superintendent. 

Ohio Division 

Roy Arrasmith, section hand on section M-9, 
Midland District, discovered effective equip- 
ment on a car in train of extra west 2827. Mr. 
Arrasmith notified operator at Sabina, who in 
turn notified agent at Melvin. Train w^as 
flagged and car set out. Mr. Arrasmith is to 
be commended for his watchfulness and his 
efforts to have the train stopped and the dam- 
aged car set out. 

Some time ago extra east 2801 out of Chilli- 
cothe had a new fireman, who was imable to 
keep up steam on engine. Brakeman H. Carnes, 
who was with this crew, volunteered to fire 
engine from West Junction to Athens and re- 
turning, Athens to Chillicothe, preventing 
serious delay to this train. A commendatory 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



entry was placed upon the record of brakeman 
Games for his interest in the Company's 
welfare. 

Indiana Division 

On the morning of May 29 while No. 30 was 
passing our station building at Mitchell, 
engineer E. Donahue of the Mitchell night 
yard crew noticed defective equipment on a 
car and conductor L. F. Cutsinger of the 
Mitchell night yard crew succeeded in commu- 
nicating signal to conductor R. B. Ingraham in 
charge of train No. 30 and the latter stopped 
train from rear end. Engineer Donahue and 
conductor Cutsinger assisted in correcting the 
the defect. 

Illinois Division 

The superintendent and members of his staff, 
while going over the Springfield Sub-Division 
on May 1, warmly congratulated agent H. M. 
Schoen, at Gilmore, Illinois, stating to him that 
he had the cleanest station on the Illinois Divi- 
sion that they had ever seen. The waiting- 
room and office floors had been scrubbed until 
they looked like polished hardwood. The 
interior had been painted and all of the records 
and reports were kept in a neat and orderly 
manner. The superintendent instructed the 
division engineer on the ground to provide 
suitable shelves or lockers in the freight house 
to store old records in order to assist agent 
Schoen in keeping his freight room in as good 
condition as he does waiting-room and office. 
It was explained to agent Schoen at Gilmore, 



that while agent Ausbrook, at Noble, had 
carried the honors on the Illinois Division for 
keeping his station and surroundings spotless, 
he considered agent Schoen should be placed 
in the same class from the fact that his depot 
is an old building while the depot at Noble is 
practically a new building. 

The superintendent also commented on find- 
ing all stations -between Flora and Springfield, 
with the exception of one or two, in better con- 
dition than ever before. 

Shortly after 3.00 a. m., April 5, engineer W. 
E. Ayers, on extra 2862 east, found a small fire 
on Bridge 232-99, east of Clay City, Illinois. 
He stopped and extinguished the fire. Mr. 
Ayers is to be commended for his watchfulness 
and the interest he showed in preventing 
damage to Company property. 

On April 22 third trick operator J. D. Spicier, 
at Sumner, noticed defective equipment on 
train No. 94 while it was passing his office, 
and was imable to stop the train. He notified 
the dispatcher and the train was stopped at 
Lawrenceville and inspected. Mr. Spitler is to 
be commended for his watchfulness. 

On April 22 as train No. 29, engine 1456, was 
passing station at Lawrenceville, station bag- 
gagemaster James Redding noticed defective 
equipment on one of the cars. Mr. Redding had 
the dispatcher notified and train was stopped 
at Bridgeport, where the trouble was corrected. 
Mr. Redding is to be commended for his close 
observance. 



ii 



OURELY a man has come to himself only when he has 
^ found the best that is in him, and has satisfied his 
heart with the highest achievement he is fit for. It is only 
then that he knows of what he is capable and what his 
heart demands. — Woodrow Wilson 



AMONG OURSELVES 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, John Limpert 

A very important, if not the most important 
social event of the office during the past month, 
was the wedding of Miss Nellie M. Pierpont to 
Albert Friese, which took place May 11. The 
happy couple spent their honeymoon at Atlantic 
City and several other places of interest. We 
understand there was some mail awaiting the 
newlyweds on their arrival at the hotel at 
Atlantic City. However, we all join in wishing 
the bride and groom much and everlasting 
happiness. 

On Saturday, May 4, as a fitting climax to the 
drive for the Third Liberty Loan, to which this 
office responded 100 per cent., every employe 
of the 108 subscribing to at least one bond, the 
total amount of which was $6,950, a service 
flag, on which appears six stars and an Ameri- 
can flag, were raised in the office, preceded by 
a short address by L. A. Lambert, in which he 
briefly outlined the present struggle for democ- 
racy and complimenting the office on the 
splendid and patriotic support given the Loan. 

These emblems will serve as daily reminders 
of the fact that the best nation in the world is 
at war with a merciless enemy, whose avowed 
purpose it is to crush all that we hold dear, and 
also that six of our number are doing their 
utmost to frustrate these plans. 

After the address by Mr. Lambert, the en- 
tire office force arose and sang the National 
Anthem, led by "Will" Henry with his cornet. 

In these days of heroic deeds on land and sea, 
one is forced to admire the great bravery dis- 



played by certain employes of this office, who 
though they be thousands of miles from the 
actual war, with a wide and deep ocean between, 
deliberately enter into a contract which prom- 
ises to be a continuous war "until death us do 
part." We do not mention his name, but a 
certain checker, with light bushy hair, silently 
slipped away to New York on a honeymoon. 
We wish the bride happiness and prosperity. 

Over the top again. Three hundred and 
eighteen dollars in cash and pledges secured 
through this office for the second Red Cross 
War Fund. To Miss Elsie Harris is due a great 
deal of credit for this splendid showing. 

From a distance, it looks to us as if old "Dan" 
Cupid has gone plumb crazy with the heat, his 
latest "victim" in this office being Miss M. A. 
Elgin, who henceforth will be known as Mrs. 
1. M. O'Keefe. This makes three in the last 
month, which is going some. At any rate here 
is hoping for a long and happy married life. 

Auditor Passenger Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, George Eichner 

"We must win this war to assure our con- 
tinued existence as a free nation, and we cannot 
succeed without billions of dollars. And it is 
our positive duty to sacrifice." 

This was part of a paragraph of a circular 
sent out on April 6 by President Willard, which 
was read to the clerks of this office by the 
chairman of our Liberty Loan Committee. 

In response the committee received 150 
subscriptions, which was ninety-seven per cent, 
of the office force. Total amount, $11,000. 

The subscriptions were about equally divided 
among the committee, who worked very earn- 
estly in its behalf. 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The committee Avas as follows: 

L. ]\L Grice, ehairman; Miss 13. Broderick, 
Miss F. M. Heiderieh, Miss 11. E. Lutman, Miss 
M. A. Hamlen, Miss Ulla Nilson, Miss Celeste 
Hayden, W. L. Seems, F. S. Johnson, R. E. 
Machin, George Eichner, H. H. Ackler and 
C. E. O wings. . 

Harry S. Phelps of this office, was reappointed 
clerk to the City Council of Laurel, Md., by 
Mayor George P. McCene}^ who was recently 
elected to this office for the term of two years. 
Mr. Phelps served three terms under the ad- 
ministration of Mayor Walters . 

Miss Ruth Tipton of this office and Roy 
Knight were married at Raspeburg, Md., on 
April 20. She was given a pretty silver service 
by her fellow clerks. They are living at 
Bradshaw, Md. 

Miss Neva Battenfeld sprung a surprise on her 
fellow clerks by suddenly announcing her 
marriage to Frank Kent, a petty officer in 
L^ncle Sam's Navy. He is stationed at Nor- 
folk, Va., where they are making their home. 
Miss Battenfeld was given a clock and candle 
sticks to match by her many friends in this 
office. We all wish her the best of luck. 

Frank Snyder of this office has enlisted in the 
Naval Reserves and is stationed at Norfolk, Va. 

Uncle Sam has called four more of our clerks 
to assist in fighting the Him. They are, Edwin 
J. Kuehn, Roland Hasson, Thomas L. Jeffries 
and Chester A. Donelson. 



of railroad practice, yet one who found time to 
relax, evidenced l)y his interest in the game 
of baseball. 

He was born at Buffalo, Putnam County, 
West Virginia, on January 1, 1879. He began 
his railroad career at the age of eighteen as 
telegraph operator for the Kanawha and Michi- 
gan Railroad, and later served that company 
for a number of years as station agent. 

His service with the Baltimore and Ohio 
began when he became telegraph operator at 
Markleton, Pa., and later at Confluence. He 
also served as agent at Opekiska, W. Va. In 1913 
he became a claim investigator in the Freight 
Claim Department at Baltimore and continued 
with that department until his death. His 
work was marked by conscientious fidelity to 
details and everything he handled was well 
done. 

He was married at Carmellton, West Vir- 
ginia, on June 18, 1900, to Miss Lillian Gooch, 
who, with one daughter, Sarah, survive him. 
Mr. Holstein was buried near Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Stores Department 

Effective May 1 E. W. Walther was appointed 
chief clerk to the general storekeeper, vice 
H. P. McQuilkin, promoted. 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, T. A. Kavanagh, Freight 
Agent, West 26th Street, N. R. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. B. Biggs Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. L. MicHELSON Terminal Cashier 

C. E. Floom Terminal Claim Agent 

J. J. Bayer Freight Agent, Pier 22, N. R. 

J. T. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

T. Kavanagh Freight Agent, 26th Street, N. R. 

T. F. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

M. F. Steinberger Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

J. E. Davis Freight Agent, St. George Transfer 

E.J. Kehoe Freight Agent, Pier 4, Wallabout 

Marine Department Members 

E. A. English Marine Supervisor, Chairman 

C. H. Kearney. Assi.stant Marine Supervisor, Vice-Chairman 



Due to the enlistments and selects leaving, 
we are going to add six more stars to the six- 
teen we already have in our service flag. 

Bert Ogden, formerly of the C. H. & D. R'y, 
has been given an indefinite furlough to enable 
him to return to his family at Pleasant Ridge, 
O., near Cincinnati, O., and he expects to secure 
employment at the latter point with the Balti- 
more and Ohio. Mr. Ogden will be very much 
mi.ssed as he has proven his efficiency and gained 

quite a number of friends among us. ^ 

Our former correspondent, George Eichner, Staten Island Rapid Transit 

has been given an indefinite; furlough to go to Railway Company 

Jacksonville, Fla., where, after a brief visit Correspondent, J. V. Costello, Trainmaster's 

to see his relatives, he will enlist in the U. S. Clerk St. Georce 

Navy at that point. r^. • • i c c * ^ •** 

' Divisional Safety Committee 

k j'^ rr • w i^i • > r\£ti H. I{. Hanlin Chairman, Superintendent 

Auditor rreight Claims Uttice S. A. Tukvey Secretarv.Trainmaster's Clork 

Corresp-mdent, H. Ihving Martin h. w. Orue.m.vn Divi.sionEnginc^^^ 

' ' W. A. Dee.ms Master .Mechanic 

Many men who do their work well, bearing W. L. Duyden. signal Supervi.sor 

I e I A xii 1 fiii? H.I'.tAKi.ow Ma.ster Carpenter 

a share of ihu departmental burden, feel that Dr. k. De Revere Medical Examiner 

life is but a Heri(;H of small things. To t hese men A. J. Coni.ey Road Foreman of Engines 

comes the fe(;ling that they an^ without honor • • ■■'^'''nT;'t^or 

• • \/ ,I.F. McCowAN Division Operator 

in their own cf)iiritry. Yet thes(! men are apprc- ,.; ,{ decher Division Agent 

ciat(;d by all who cf)rne into contact with Ihetn. \V.-J. Kenney Attorney 

Thosf! who knew Oscar Iv Holstein, realized C. A. Wilson Supervisor Crossing Watchman 

his full worth. His associates Miid his superior „, ^, Rotating Members t.^„.„. r 

/r. f ,. ,, . . 1 c ,1 I W. NKiDKfiHAt sKH Towcrman, Towcr B 

ofncers f(!li that here was one who gave full and , ,^ cv.huw Freight Conductor 

faithful service. (irv VKV/.r.n Painter 

iliA death, by paralysis, on March 1.3, came W. S.Mmr Locomotive Engineer 

, ' 11 I • 1 • • I .1 .NvPi EH Locomotive I'lreman 

MS a jxTsonal loss lo all who were in his circle Makhmau Clerk to Agent, Tompkinsville 

of friends. He was a man's man. A student G . J. (iooi.ic Inspector 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



53 




THE LATE RUBEN TITUS 



Above is a photograph of Ruben Titus, who 
died February 3. Mr. Titus entered the ser- 
vice of the Baltimore and Ohio when a boy. 
He worked as floatman, deckhand, mate and 
pilot. While a young man, he was able to pass 
the examination before the United States Local 
Inspectors for a master's license. He then 
served in the Baltimore and Ohio service as a 
tugboat captain. He left the service to work 
as a trainman to get the experience. He was 
ambitious to work beyond the position as 
master of a tug. He came back to the Balti- 
more and Ohio as a tug dispatcher, and later 
entered the service of the United States in the 
mine sweeping division. While sweeping for 
mines he was badly injured about the shoulders 
and body and for a period was in the Marine 
Hospital, Stapleton, Staten Island. He died 
at his home in West New Brighton, Staten 
Island, February 3. The picture shows him 
with his two children dressed in the naval 
uniform. His brother, Irving W. Titus, is mas- 
ter of the tug Narragansett and has also been 
in the service of the Baltimore and Ohio from 
a boy, and is regarded as a very capable master 
of tug boats, 

S. A. Turvey, former trainmaster's clerk and 
Staten Island Division correspondent of the 
Magazine, has been furloughed to enter the 
service of Uncle Sam as yard clerk in the olst 
Railroad Regiment of Engineers recruiting 
at Camp Lee, Petersburg, Va. All the boys 
extend to "Sam" their best wishes for a safe 
return. 

Opposite is a photograph of "Joe" Liccardelli, 
who, until drafted into government service, 
was employed as trackman, maintenance of 
way department. "Joe" served in the track 
department as water boy, laborer and leading 
laborer. 



On the evening of May 20 the Safety First 
Bureau exhibited motion pictures entitled 
"Championship Baseball Game," "Competing 
for the Thompson and Davis Cups," "Fighting 
Fire at Locust Point" and "The Rule of Rea- 
son," after which a short address along the 
lines of safety first was made by the Honorable 
J. Barry Tiernan (Richmond County Judge). 
At the conclusion of Judge Tiernan's address 
the floor was cleared for dancing. Music was 
furnished by Professor Guth's Jazz Band. 
There was a large attendance and all present 
had a very enjoyable evening. 

Former assistant marine supervisor E. J. 
Kelly is a visitor each time he has shore leave. 
Captain Kelly cannot forget that he is still a 
Baltimore and Ohio man at heart, even though 
he is in the naval service. 

The tug Shriver, Captain A. Bohlen, has been 
painted, and is a beautiful picture. Just from 
the shop, after having a new rudder applied. 

The tug Cowen is again in service after 
having considerable w^ork done on engine and 
house. Captain E. G. Clarke is proud of his 
boat. 

Captain J. Young of the relief crew, has had 
his license extended to cover the ferryboat 
at Perth Amboy. "Jack" is now a full-fledged 
passenger and towing man. 

Engineer C. Johnson, of the tug Underwood, 
is also a beam engineer and is employed as 
engineer on the extra ferryboat in service on 
Sundays and holidays. 




"JOE ■■ TJCCARDELLI 



54 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAC5AZINE 



Edward Taylor, mate, has entered the Naval 
Reserves located at Pelham Bay. He has been 
given the rank of first class boatswain's mate. 

Harry Flood, who left the Company to go 
in the service of M. and J. Tracey Towing Co., 
has returned to the Baltimore and Ohio service 
as mate and extra captain. 

The McMyler at Arlington is again working 
twenty-four hour shifts. Captain H. Mclntyre 
has been transferred to tug Narragansett in 
night service, taking care of the work at that 
point at night, placing of boats, etc. 

Harry Lockwood, mate in the marine depart- 
ment, resigned May 24 to enter the United 
States Naval Reserve Force as boatswain on 
the submarine chasers. The best of luck was 
extended to Harry to get all the U-boats he can. 

Miss Eva Runnow has been transferred from 
the lighterage department, St. George, to 
stenographer in the superintendent's office. 

Miss Margaret Gordon, secretary to light- 
erage agent, has been promoted to demurrage 
clerk, vice Miss Runnow. 

Miss Margaret Eymer has been employed 
as secretary to lighterage agent, vice Miss 
Gordon. 

The following men have been called in the 
draft: J. Devoti, L. V. Shea, and F. J. Marino, 
passenger trainmen; H. McCafferty and R. 
Barrick, freight trainmen. 

F. G. Nodocker, former chief clerk to light- 
erage agent, has been furloughed to enter the 
service of Uncle Sam in the Stevedore Regi- 
ment, Camp Hill, Newport News, Va. All the 
boys extend their best wishes to "Freddie" for 
a speedy return. 

Engineer J. W. LaForge, on May 17, before 
leaving St. George with train No. 20, com- 
plained to his father, employed by the Balti- 
more and Ohio as car inspector, that he did not 
feel well. After starting from Dongan Hills 
fireman F. Haug heafd the injector break and 
looking over the boiler noticed engineer La- 
Forge was not in his proper position. He 
climbed in the engineer's side of the cab and 
found LaForge on the floor imconscious. The 
fireman stopped the train, blew out flag and 
notified conductor. The engineer was taken 
from the train and placed on the ground to await 
arrival of ambulance. He died before the 
ambulance arrived. LaForge was employed 
June 1, 1894 as wiper, promoted to flreman 
October 18, 1898, and engineer October 19, 
1905. He was a first chiss engineer and had a 
l£f>()(\ record. 

Staten Island Railroad Club 

On May 6, at 8 o'clock, the regular monthly 
meeting was held at the ('lub Hf)UK(', Livings- 
ton, Staten Isliind, and tlic following nierjibers 
were (;l(;ct(;d ofhcurn for the (insuing year: M. 
F. Steinb(;rger, prcisident; J. B. Shari), vice- 
preHident; J. V. (;f)HteIlo, secnitary, arul Joseph 
S. I''af)regaH, treasurer. 



The third annual picnic and field day of the 
association will be held at Midland Park, 
Grant City, S, I,, July 17. The committee is 
arranging for a baseball game between one of 
the Baltimore teams and the Staten Island 
teams. There will be running, jumping and 
other track events in the afternoon. At night 
there will be bowling, dancing, etc. 

Philadelphia Division 

Correspondents 
J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 
J. C. Anderson, Shop Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent 

C. E. Owen Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

T. Bloecher Division Engineer 

J. P. HiNES Master Mechanic 

J. E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

H. K. Hartman Chief Train Dispatcher 

T. B. Franklin Terminal Agent 

J. N. GoDMAN 4 Captain of Police 

F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W, Pence Medical Examiner 

E. G. Owens Road Engineer 

W. E. Burns Road Fireman 

H. F. Lane. Road Conductor 

J. F. Cooney. Yard Conductor 

Wm. Tisdale Machine Shop Foreman 

R. F. MiNNicK Car Builder 

Felice Cori Section Foreman 

W, M. Devlin Secretary 



S, M, Hoy, assistant yardmaster at East 
Side for some years past, was, on May 23, 
appointed assistant terminal trainmaster, Phila- 
delphia, vice W, V, Kelly, resigned, 

J. J. McAleer, for a long time tallyman at 
Race Street, Philadelphia, and who had been 
on the pension list for about a year, has taken 
back his old position as tallyman at Race Street. 

J. A. Sullivan has been appointed captain of 
police, Philadelphia Division, vice J. N. God- 
man, transferred to the office of the general 
superintendent of police. 

L. J. Overbeck has been appointed train- 
master's clerk at Philadelphia, vice E, F, 
Kenna, promoted to secretary to superinten- 
dent. 

The wife of H, S, Benedict, assistant divi- 
sion accoimtant, went to Lankenau Hospital 
to be operated on for appendicitis, and at last 
accounts was doing nicely. 

R. B, White, superintendent, took a few days 
off and with his family visited friends and 
relatives in Cincinnati and other [)oints in that 
vicinity. 

On May 16 the general safety committee 
presented a series of motion pictures in the 
ass(;mbly room. Chestnut Street passenger 
station, which was well attended and enjoyed 
by all. I'he picture "Rule of Reason" was 
especially entertaining. 

R. K. Trump, assistant yardmaster, Phila- 
delphia, has b(Mui a])|)()inted night general 
yardmaster at Philadelphia,, effective May 15. 

Burns Gebner was employed May 1 as a 
gen(!ral clerk in master mechanic's office at 
J<>!tsi Si(l(!, v\(H) Raymond ()gl(% resigned. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




CLAIM DEPARTMENT, CAMDEN FREIGHT STATION 



Miss Helen Sentman was transferred from 
superintendent's office, vice Miss Marie Burke, 
transferred to yard department, effective May 1. 

As a matter of general information for the 
benefit of all who read the Magazine we take 
a great deal of pride in announcing 352 sub- 
scriptions to the third Liberty Loan by motive 
power department employes at East Side. 
We subscribed a total of $21,950. 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B. Moriarity, Superin- 
tendent's Office, Camden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

P. C. AiAEN Chairman, Superintendent 



W. E. Neilson Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 
E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 



E. K. Smith Secretary, Brunswick 

C. H. WiNSLOW Secretary, Washington 

Relief Department 

Dr. E. H. Mathers Medical Examiner, Baltimore 

Dr. J. A. RoBB Medical Examiner, Washington 

Di{. J. F. Ward Medical Examiner, Winchester 

R. B. Banks Divisional Claim Agent, Baltimore 

J.M. Powell .Captain of Police, Camden Station 

Transportation Department 

S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick, Md. 

C. A. Mewshaw Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. E. HuRLOCK Division Operator, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J. J. McCabe. .Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 



W. T. MooRE Freight Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Freight Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Freight Agent, Brunswick 

W. E. Netlsen Freight Agent, Camden Station 

J. L. Hawbs Freight Conductor, Riverside 

W. T. Edgar Yard Conductor, Camden Yard 

C. W. McDaniels Passenger Fireman, Riverside 

J. W. Cavey Pa.ssenger Engineman, Riverside 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan. General Forerpan, Locust Point 

C. W. Selby Supervisor, Gaithersburg 

vS. J. LiCHLiTER Supervisor, Staunton, Va. 

W. O. RuNKLES Section Foreman, Brunswick 

C. RiTTER Signal Repairman, Mt. Royal Station 

R. W. Mitchell Carpenter Foreman, Baltimore 

Motive Power Department 

T. F. Perkinson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. Williamson General Car foreman, Riverside 

T. O'Leary Car Foreman, Washington 

C. W. C. Smith Machinist, Brunswick 

C. B. BosiEN Machinsit Apprentice, Riverside 

J. W. Peyton Leading Car Inspector, Brunswick 

G. N. Hammond Material Distributer, Locust Point 

Above is a picture of the claim department, 
Camden freight station. 

The group is arranged as follows: Front row, 
seated, left to right, P, C. Chapman, Miss 
Agnes Moriarity, Miss Fannie Stern, Miss 
Emily Socoloff, Miss Bessie Barnhardt, E. J. 
Files; second row, kneeling, left to tight, R. J. 
O'Connell, A. F. Bauernschub; back row, stand 
ing, left to right, J. R. Lamb, N. J. Sauers, J, 
C. Ward, A. A. Barnes and C. F. Perkinson. 



L 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




INBOUND BILLING DEPARTMENT, CAMDEN FREIGHT STATION 



Above is a picture of the inbound billing 
department at Camden freight station. In the 
group are: J. G. Fosbrink, J. M. Cole, G. E. 
Pritchard, F. Steinacker, R. W. Loney, J. M. 
Watkins, L. Hoffman, L. Schwab, A. Epstein, 
E. A. Burns, W. N. Zepp; Misses E. C. Martin, 
E. Miller, C. M. Litchfield, M. Groscup, I. 
Crawford, B. Saltzman, and S. Diamond. 

Effective June 1 Walter G. Carl was ap- 
pointed division accourrtant, Baltimore Divi- 
sion, headquarters Camden Station, Baltimore, 
Md., vice Oscar B. Street, furloughed account 
of military service. 

On May 1 W. A. McCleary was appointed 
terminal trainmaster, Baltimore Terminals. 

R. T, Gaither was appointed assistant 
terminal trainmaster, Baltimore Terminals, 
May 1. 

W. E. Neilson was appointed assistant super- 
intendent, Baltimore Division, vice J. P. Kava- 
nagh, resigned. 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, /Secretary 
Y. M. C. A. 

a. H. WiNKujw Chairman, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

l)n. Jamkh li. Ghiek. .Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 
Motive Powek Department 

W. M. (iRANT Boiler Foreman 

H. A. H RIGHT Gani? Txjader 

f/. J. Ayekh Ganc Li-adcr 

A. F. KuKtium Storekeeper 

T. E. Ckohon Yard Engine! Dispatcher 

N. TiFPET PVjrenian, Car Shop 

H. A. Hakefield AasiMtant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

J.J. Dehmond GanK Ix,'ader 

G. Vai-rntink Yard En«ino Dispatcher 

B. HowAKo . AH.si.stant Ff)reni!in 

It. \lr.t\imvu Foreni.in, Station 



Transportation Department 

P. H. Deleplane Train Director 

L. T. Keaxe Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 

Maintenance o' Way Department 
W. M. Cardwell Master Carpenter 

F. W. Hodges Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

H. L. Bell Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

A. M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Richmond Signal Maintainer 

As usual the Washington Terminal employes 
went "over the top" in their contributions to 
the second Red Cross War Fimd, subscrib- 
ing about $1,500. The Washington Terminal 
Women's Auxiliary also did splendid work. 
They were assigned to Liberty Hut, where the 
big meetings of the week were held, 3,500 to 
4,000 people being in attendance each evening. 
Each night was dedicated to one of our allies 
and interesting speakers, citizens of the various 
countries, addressed the meeting. Monday 
night was "English," Tuesday "French," Wed- 
nesday "Belgium and the smaller nations," 
Thursday "Italy," Friday "Canada," and 
Saturday "the United States." The auxiliary 
collected during the week about $18,000. 

Mrs. IClla C. Barker, a member of the Wash- 
ington Terminal Women's Auxiliary, recently 
returned on furlough from France. She was in 
the canteen work of tlie Red Cross at the front 
and had many wonderful experiences in her war 
work "over there." She has made a number 
of addresses since her return, both in Washing- 
ton and New ^'ork. 

Ma(hinie liartlett, a Red Cross nurse under 
the French Government since the l)eginning of 
the war between France and (Jennany, gave an 
inspiring address at the 'IVrminal sh()|)s during 
tlic noon hour, May 24. Siip(>rintend(Mit W.J. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



57 



Wilson introduced her and followed her address 
with appropriate remarks, urging loyalty, sup- 
port and cooperation in every way with the 
■United States and our allies, to win the war. 

The Washington Terminal Women's Aux- 
iliary made a most creditable showing in the 
Red Cross parade May 19. They had one of 
the best floats in the line, demonstrating the 
work of the Red Cross auxiliaries, sewing 
machines running, knitting, making bandages, 
etc. They received frequent applause all along 
the line of march. 

A new motion picture machine has been pur- 
chased for the Terminal Railroad Y. M. C. A. 
and picture shows will be given Aveekly, with 
occasional exhibitions for the men and their 
families. The men at the shops will not be for- 
gotten and will have an opportunity to see the 
pictures once in a while, during the limch hour. 

George G. Pennell, for several months assist- 
ant secretary, foimd it necessary on accoimt of 
ill health to resign. He had made many friends 
during the time he has been with the Railroad 
Y. M. C. A. and their good wishes for entire 
recovery go with him. 

Frequent letters from the men who have gone 
to camps and across the sea are received and 
all are enthusiastic in their desire to have a 
part in making the world safe for democracy. 
No complaints, but all anxious to get into action 
for Uncle Sam and the allies. 

April was another record breaker in the num- 
ber of beds used, the daily average being 202. 

Among other valuable books added to the 
library is Fred H. Colvin's "Aircraft Mechanics 
Handbook," a collection of facts and sugges- 
tions from factory and flying field to assist in 
caring for modern aircraft. A number of our 
members are now in the air division of the 
signal corps, and others are trying to enlist in it. 



Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting, Chief Clerk 

The accompanying photograph of W. A. Keys, 
Jr., the taller of the two boys in the picture, 
will be of interest to those among our readers 
who remember him when he was handling 
freight some few years ago on our platform at 
New York Avenue station; but perhaps he 
will be better know as the son of "Doc" W. 
A. Keys, who is chief clerk to car foreman 
T, O'Leary. 

Our gallant sailor boy enlisted in the U. S. 
Navy in April, 1911, serving as a coal passer 
on the Cattleship "Kansas." He served for 
four years on the "Kansas," during which time 
he was promoted to water tender. At the end 
of his first four j^ears he reshipped, and is now 
serving as chief petty officer on the S. S. "Wads- 
worth." About three months ago he became 
the happy father of a bouncing ten pound boy, 
and it is the intention of the father to teach 
the boy to climb the rigging, and all other 
accomplishments dear to the heart of a "jolly 



tar," and thus make a good sailor of him, ready 
at any time to amswer the call of Uncle Sam. 

Some of the boys from this station, who are 
at Camp McClellan, Alabama, have taken ad- 
vantage of the furloughs granted them, and have 
come to Washington to visit their relatives 
once more before being sent "over there," 
Amongst these was Irwin Stein, former stenog- 
rapher in this office, who called to see us and 
entertained us with a glowing account of the 
conditions of the soldier's life in camp. Some 
of us have received interesting letters from 
Corporal W. L. Santman, who is stationed at 
the same camp. Lee is looking forward to 
enjoying his furlough, and we hope to see him 
walk into the office before many days have 
passed by. We are always glad to see any of 
our boys who are going to the front to fight for 
our homes and our freedom, and they always 
receive a hearty w-elcome when they drop in to 
see us. We cannot forget that we are forever 
their debtors and the following short article, 
taken from the Washington, D. C, Herald, 
May 7, seems to be very appropriate in con- 
nection with this sentiment: 

An English boy of only twenty years was 
killed in France. Foimd on his body was a 
letter of comfort to his parents: 

"We shall live forever in the results of our 
efforts. We shall live as those who by their 
sacrifice won the great war. 

"You must console yourself with the thought 
that I am happy. The measure of life is not its 
span but the use made of it." 

This is the fine spirit of the true soldier and 
there is no compensation to the world for the 
loss of those who have it. 

It makes debtors forever of those who remain 
at home to profit by the peace to come. 



W. A. KEYS, Jr. (RIGHT) 




58 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



We can never close our account with those 
who die on the field of honor. Perhaps the 
humblest tribute we can pay to their memory 
is to follow the wisdom of the young English 
hero, 

"The measure of life is not its span but the 
use made of it." 

We recently got busy and raised a large ser- 
vice flag in front of our office. It is, of course, 
onl}' a slight tribute to our boys who have 
gone, and who are now preparing to go, but it 
conveys to the community that we are trying 
not to forget that we are represented at the 
front by some of our number who are ready to 
lay down their lives that we who are left behind 
may enjoy peape and prosperity. 

Our subscriptions to the Third Libert}^ Loan 
exceeded our expectations, but not our hopes, 
as we were able to send in eighty-two applica- 
tions for a total sum of $4,520 through this 
office. 

The American Red Cross has also benefited 
by manj' generous contributions from the boys 
and girls at this station. We are giving all 
we think we can, and then some, keeping on 
giving "till it hurts." 

Sickness has again depleted our force. 
Tallyman W. A. Clark was obliged to give up 
for a time and demurrage clerk J. C. White is 
also confined to his home. Our sincere wishes 
go out to them for a speedy recovery and return 
to their desks with renewed strength and vigor. 

A surprise came to us all recently when the 
news leaked out that one of our lady clerks 
had decided to change her name and take 
unto herself a husband. Miss Clara Porton, 
who, by the way, was the first young lady to 




nOY A. CIUAK.S 




HARRY RUEHL 



accept a position in this office, became Mrs. 
Clara Hurwitz, Our hearty congratulations 
are extended to the happy bride and bridegroom 
and our appreciation of the surprise was shown 
in the shape of a "wedding shower." One 
day, on Mrs. Hurwitz's return from lunch, 
she found her desk all littered up with packages 
containing tinware, linen of all descriptions, 
and other articles dear to the heart of "newly- 
weds." 

Mrs. Hurwitz acknowledged the gifts in a 
pleasing manner, and everyone who had a share 
in the shower felt glad that they had an oppor- 
tunity to contribute. The only drawback in 
the affair is the fact that the bride of necessity 
left us. This, of course, we regret, but we all 
wish her a long life, with health and pros- 
perity. 

Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, \. F. Riley 

Divisional Safety Committee 



L. FiNEOAN Chairman. Superintendent of Shop^ 

K. P. Poole Vice-Chairman, Asst. Supt. of Shops 

\'. F. IJiLEV Secretary, Secretary to Supt. of Shops 

.1 Howe General Foreman 

II A. Bkaumo.nt General Car Foreman 

(;. II. Kai'tnos Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

Dh. F. II. Dui(;s Assistant Medical Examiner 

J'. F. VVa(;ne!{ Shop Hand, Erect inK Shop 

H. T. Stickem, lioilermaker, Boiler Shop 

(;. F. Klein Piece Work Inspector, No. 1 .Machine ShEp 

E. M. HuNTiNO Machinist, No. 2 Machine Shop 

W. H. Robinson Pipe Fitter, Pipe and Tin Shop 

(I M. Kif«EB Moulder, Foundries and He-Rolline Mill 

.1. T. (JiLE8 RIackamifh, Blacksmitii Shop 

(.',. ScHMALE Machine Operator, liolt and Forae Shop 

W. P. May Machinist, Air Brake Shop 

C. KEH8LER Patternmaker, Pattern Shop 

A. G. Mekcer Machinist, No. 3 Machine Shop 

and Steel Car Plant 

T. V. Dover. . . .Shop Hand, Tender .and Tender Paint Shop 
H. .\lker Shop Hand, Axle Shop and Power Plant 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZENE 



59 



J. E. Leary Gang Foreman, Freight Car Track 

J. Jankiew icz Car Builder, Passenger Car Erecting Shop 

W. F. ZoELiERS Upholsterer, Passenger Car Plant, 

Finishing and Upholsteiins Shops 

J. J. PiTSiNGER Mill Machine Hand, Saw Mill 

and Cabinet Shops 

W. Banaiian Foreman, Stores Department 

On opposite pajie is a photograph of one of our 
boys, Harry Ruehl, of the stores department, 
Mt. Clare, who went into the service of Uncle 
Sam last month. 

On page 58 is a photograph of Roy A. Groves, 
U. S. Marine, who enlisted July 19, 1917. He 
was selected for foreign service in February, 
1918, and placed on one of the U. S. convoj^s. 
He has been over twice, and advises all young 
men not in the service to join the Marine 
Cori3s. He was employed in the press room 
of the Relief Press, Mount Clare. 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
W. C. MoNTiGNAXi, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
Laura E. Lingamfelter, Stenographer, Mainte- 
nance of Way Department 

Division Artist 
Mable R. Crawford, Tonnage Clerk, Division 
Accountant' s Office 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Deneen Chairman, Superintendent 

T K. Faherty Assistant Superintendent 

t'. R. Rees Secretary 




RALPH GROVE 



E. P. Welshonce Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainmaster, East End 

L.J. WiLMOTH Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

W. T. Hughes Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechainc 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

Dr. J. A. DoRNER Medical Examiner 

Dr. J. H. Mayer Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

W. D. Strouse Joint Agent 

L. O. Miller Car Foreman, Ea.st End 

R. A. TuLL Car Foreman, West End 

F. L. Leyh Stoiekeeper 

E. A. Workman Storekeeper 

Robert Chh.ders .* Divi.sion Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

L S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Tati.or Master Carpenter 

W. h. Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. Montignani. Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
M. E. Mullin. . .Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. C. Hauser , Conductor 

F. Haddix Engineer 

H. H. Grimm Fireman , 

J. D. Defibaugh Machinist 

C. W. Robinson Car Inspector 

F. B. Rathke Yard Brakeman 

Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association 
of Cumberland, Md. 

President 

Griffin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Vice-Presidents 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

A. J. Kelly General Yardmaater 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secrf-tary 

C. W. Fries Chief Clerk to Division Accountant 

On May 1 T. R. Stewart was appointed 
master mechanic, Cumberland Division, head- 
quarters Cumberland, Md., vice F. P. Pf abler, 
granted leave of absence to accept service with 
the Division of Locomotive Repairs, United 
States Railroad Administration. 

Thomas R. Rees, secretary to superintendent 
and one of the correspondents for the Magazine 
on this division, has been promoted to secretary 
to E. E. Hamilton in Baltimore. Mr. Rees 
assumed his new duties June 1. While his 
many friends here were sorry to lose him, all 
were gratified at the well merited promotion. 

Effective May 15 H. A. Lapp Avas appointed 
assistant storekeeper at Cumberland, Md., 
vice W. H. Shaw, furloughcd. 

Opposite is a picture of west end Cumberland 
Division brakeman H. E. Grove's son Ralph, 
age thirteenth months, who is the pride of the 
family. 

The engineers and firemen located at Pied- 
mont hill are a patriotic croAvd of men. On 
May 30, at 12:30 p. m., they raised a flag on a 
fifty-five foot pole that had been planted in 
front of the rest house. Engineers Kight, 
Hook and Smith went to EvQretts Tunnell Cut, 
which is on the seventeen mile grade and cut 
the pole. The Italian Band of Piedmont, 
which is composed mostly ( wor ] train an 



GO 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 





TRACK No. 7, TIMBER PRESERVATION PLANT, GREEN SPRING, W. VA. 



track men, furnished music for the occasion 
and they have some band, and deserve a great 
deal of credit. 

J. F. Harrison, of Piedmont, was chairman 
and introduced the speakers. The Rev. Ray, 
of the Piedmont Presbyterian Church, and 
Senator Sutherland, of West Virginia, made 
the addresses that were much appreciated. 
On this flag pole there floats Old Glory and 
beneath it is a service flag of five stars, for the 
five who are in the service. 

Claudius Terrell, son of agent J. Z. Terrell, 
has enlisted in the aviation corps and has been 
ordered to Dallas, Texas. He left on train 
No. 1, May 31. 

Corporal T. W. Wagoner, formerly of the 
division accountant's office, who was among 
the first to land in France with General Per- 
shing, has been appointed second lieutenant 
on the firing line. Good for ''Tob." We are 
all glad to hear of his success and know that he 
is worthy of it. 

The accompanying photographs were taken 
along track No. 7 in the yard at the timber 
preservation plant at Green Spring and show 
our method of piling and caring for ties while 
seasoning for treatment. These photographs 
giv(; a fair view of the care given our ties. 

'J'he one opposite was taken at the lower or east 
end of this track near the l(;ad and shows how 
nicely ties were jjil(;d to conform to th(; curve. 
The one above is a straight away view of this 
f rack and is a sn!ii>shol of ;ij)proxiinat('ly 170, (KM) 
ties with the plant buildings at t h(! far (!nd of th(! 
track. The ties are unloadcul from car to 
ground by i)iecework(!rs nnd pihsd 7 and 1, 
Hi tiers liigh and 4 tiers back from the track; 
each pile when eomi)l(!te contains 412 ties, 
exclusive of tlu; sill ti(;s, which are cull ti(!S that 
have been giv(^n light preservative; tr(!alinent. 



Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

Sergeant J. A. Wolford, whose picture appears 
on opposite page, is one of our shop boys who went 
into the National Army in the first draft. He 
left Martinsburg with the first contingent for 
Camp Lee, Va., and began his military career 
as a private. A short time later he was pro- 
moted to corporal. When a call was made for 
volunteers to ga to France, Corporal Wolford 
volunteered and was sent overseas in charge of 
colored troops. He was then promoted to ser- 
geant and is in Company D, 505th Engineers, 
''somewhere in France." He wrote to his 
mother recently and told her ''not to worry." 




MErnoJ) OK PHJNG TIES AT GREEN 
SI'KINCJ, W. VA. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 




J. A. WOLFORD 



He is there to do his duty and feels proud o^ 
the fact. He says if the people back home 
could realize the sacrifices the French have 
gladly made, they would double their eflforts. 
He said that the French people treat the Amer- 
icans fine and try to make them feel at home. 
After what he has seen it makes him feel doubly 
glad he is there to do his share in behalf of 
France and of this country. 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 
E. S. Jenkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

C. F, Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 



Hugh Wilson Chairman, Superintendent, Grafton 

J. McClung Trainmaster, Grafton 

J. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Grafton 

C. E. DoTSON Road Foreman, Grafton 

G. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton 

H. L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton 

J. O. Martin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg 

Dr. C. a. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton 

Dr. E. a. Fleetwood Medical Examiner, Clarksburg 

P. B. Phinney Agent, Grafton 

J. D. Anthony Agent, Fairmont 

S. H. Wells Agent, Clark.sburg 

R. L. ScHiLL Agent, Weston 

E.J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon 

W. E. Cl.vyton Assistant Chief Clerk to Superintendent 



On May 1 E. Bartlett, trainmaster, was 
transferred and now has charge of the M. R. 
and Short Line Districts, with headquarters 
at Fairmont, W. Va., vice B. Z. Holverstott, 
promoted. 

Effective May 1 J. McClung, trainmaster, 
was transferred and placed in charge of Parkers- 
burg Branch, Clarksburg to Parkersburg, includ- 
ing Clarksburg Terminal, with headquarters at 
Clarksburg,W.Va., vice E. Bartlett, transferred. 

Effective April 25 A. F. McWilliams was 
appointed assistant trainmaster and rules exam- 
iner, with h(!adciuartcrs at Grafton, W. Va. 



On May 1 J. Niland was appointed train- 
master in charge of G. and B. District and 
Parkersburg Branch from Grafton to Clarks- 
burg, W. Va., with headquarters at Grafton, 
W. Va., vice J. McClung, transferred. 

Baltimore and Ohio employes at Grafton, 
W. Va., have raised a service flag in honor of 
R. L. Foley, L. Garlow and J. H. Kirkpatrick, 
who have entered the service of Uncle Sam. 
The flag was placed in the pipe fitters' and help- 
ers' department as the three men were formerly 
employed there. Those who promoted the 
affair were D. B. Ramsey, C. E. Hedrick and 
W. L. Moore. The men at the Grafton shops 
have shown their patriotism in various and 
substantial ways. 

The many friends of J. C. Newham, the 
efficient manager of the Grafton Relay tele- 
graph office, who was operated on at Mercy. 
Hospital, Baltimore, several weeks ago, are 
glad to see him back again and hope for a speedy 
recovery. 



Wheeling Division 

Correspondent, C. F. Miller, Ojjice of 
Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. V. Smith Superintendent 

E. C. Wight. Division Engineer 

F. C. Schorndorfer Master Mechanic 

C. Malone Trainmaster 

M.J. Walsh Road Foreman of Engines 

M. E. Cartwright Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

F. M. Garber Car Foreman 

Dr. D. L. Norris Medical Examiner 

H. H. Tederick Track Supervisor 




THOMAS G. CONNERS 



62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




H. K. Reid Engineer 

G. E. Gatewood Conductor 

L. O. SwANN Fireman 

H. Parker Machinist Helper 

L. C. Nichols Brakeman 

J. R. Padden Secretary 

The picture on page 61 is that of Thomas 
G. Conners, who is now at Fort Scribben, Ga. 
Mr. Conners for three years was employed 
in the car distributer's office at Wheeling, 
and during that time made many friends. 
From the picture it appears that he is enjoying 
camp life. He will be glad to receive letters 
from any of his friends on the division. 

J. H. Kellar, relief agent, Wheeling Division, 
was chosen by Uncle Sam for the army. He 
left with Wheeling's quota May 27 for Camp 
Lee, Petersburg, Va. Mr. Kellar was em- 
ployed by the Company for eleven years and 
has many friends on this division as well as 
other divisions. They all wish him the greatest 
success. If "Jake" proves to be as valuable 
a man for I'ncle Sam as he was for the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, the war will soon be over. 
Mr. Kellar has been succeeded by C. E. Todd. 

H. A. Ingram, chief clerk to division engi- 
ne(!r, was called by Uncle Sam on May^ 27. 
Mr. Ingram was in the emjiloy of the Com- 
pany at Wheeling for tlie past thr(!e months, 
(luring wlii(;h time he nuid(! many friends, who 
wish him success. 

Ricluird Murphy, first tri(rk main line dis- 
f)atcli('r, who has be(;n off duty sinc(! A|)ril 4 
Dwing to sickness, is able to b(; back at his 
table, ilis many friends werii'glad to see him 
r(;turn. 

MisH Mary Land(TH, orie of the popular 
yolSftg h-ulies employed in ihv. Benwood yard 
oUicl', pulled one over on her inany friends. On 
.January 10 .Miss Landers was married to Wil- 



liam Boyce, although nothing was said by her 
about it imtil just recently, when Miss Landers 
resigned. The many friends of the yoimg 
married couple join in hearty congratulations. 

Earl Abbot is another of the Baltimore 
and Ohio patriotic young men. He enlisted 
in a railroad regiment March 25 and is now 
in training at Fort Slocum, New York. Mr. 
Abbot has been with the Baltimore and Ohio 
for the past four years. Mr. Abbot was em- 
ployed as assistant chief clerk to the district 
superintendent motive power at Wheeling. 

C. H. Bonnesen was appointed trainmaster, 
Wheeling Division, headquarters Wheeling, W. 
Va., vice W. Beverly, furloughed for military 
service. Effective May 1. 

The accompanying picture is that of track 
foreman W. M. Lemley, second from right, and 
his gang. They have been working about the 
viaduct at the Wheeling passenger depot. 
^From left to right, B. W. Ernest, Mrs. Oley 
Henthorne, W. M. Apporman, Louis Neidert, 
E. Gronseth, W. E. Dorsey, W. M. Lemley, 
and E. F. Haught ; kneeling, A. B. Lund. Mr. 
L(!mley has charge of section twenty-three 
and has been in th(^ service of the Baltimore 
and Ohio for tw(>nty-nine years. This gang 
has shown that they ar(> true Ain(u-icans, as 
they are all owners of a Third Liberty Loan 
Bond. 

Ray Dare, employed as geniMal clerk in the 
general superini (>n(i(Mit 's oflice at Wheeling, 
now located with Fncle Sam's boys at Camp 
Le(!, Va., visited his nuuiy friends at Wheeling 
rec(uitly whiU^ home on a short furlough. 

11. A. Ingram has accepted jjosition as raaih- 
tcnance of way clerk at Wlie<'ling. vice H. A. 
Moore. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 



L. B. Stiipp has accepted the position as 
no-bill clerk at Wheeling and his many friends 
at Brunswick will be glad to learn of his re-en- 
tering the services of the Baltimore and Ohio. 
Mr. Cameron, who was formerly no-bill clerk at 
Wheeling, has resigned to accept another posi- 
tion. 

Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 
S. S. RouscH, Office of Superintendent 
Miss Helen Wright, Office of Division Engineer 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Root Superintendent 

F. G. MoRAN., Trainmaster 

J. G. KiRCHER Road Foreman of Engines 

O. J. Kelly Master Mechanic 

L . E . Haislip Division Engineer 

F. R. Davis Terminal Trainmaster 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

E. Chapman Captain of Police 

F. A. Carpenter Agent, Parkersburg 

S. E. Eastburn Agent, Yardmaster, Huntington 

H. F. Owens Secretary 

Rotating Members 

P. M. Roe Engineer 

O. W. McCarty Fireman 

H. Neal Conductor 

M. F. Caldwell Brakeman 

A. C. Smith Car Department 

C. R. Taylor Locomotive Department 

J. E. Rosier Stores Department 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, G. B. Gymer, Secretary to 
Superintendent, Cleveland 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. B. Green Superintendent 

G. B. Gymer Secretary 

J.J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. J. Head Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 




I 



W. C. LINN 



E. C. TICKERS 

G. R. Galloway Ma.ster Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. H. Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A.J. Bell Terminal Agent 

Dr. a. a. Church Medical Examiner 

G. J. Maisch Claim Agent 

M. E. Tuttle Division Operator 

Rotating Members (to serve six months) 

J. Hickman Relief Agent, Cleveland 

F. E. Weeks Dispatcher, Cleveland 

P. Esposito Section Foreman, Akron 

T. Ridley Carpenter Foreman, Canton 

D. Robinson Brakeman, Lorain 

W. L. Cutter Engineer, Lorain 

E. C. Haviland Engineer, Cleveland 

N. WiLBOis Conductor, Akron 

J. F. Hert Conductor, Cleveland 

J.J. Hurley Enginehouse Foreman, Cleveland 

V. Lucas Steel Car Foreman, Lorain 

Above is a photograph of E. C. Vickers, 
former clerk to road foreman of engines and 
telegraph operator. Note the happy smile. 
Mr. Vickers enlisted in the Signal Corps some 
time ago. 

Within the past month the following clerks 
in division accountant's office at Cleveland have 
enlisted: Frank Hert, Albert Smith and John 
Andrews. This mftkes a total of five who aro 
now serving Uncle Sam from this office. 

A recent addition to the division account- 
ant's offices at Cleveland is Miss Leonora 
Winters, who is filling position of stenographer. 

Mrs. Lucela Cole, clerk in division accoimt- 
ant's office, recently married, has started to 
bake biscuits for her "hubby" in their new 
home in Lakewood. 

Opposite is a photograph of W. C. Linn, who 
is now serving his country "Over There." All 
of his fellow employes feel if he serves his 
country as well as he did the Baltimore and 
Ohio that his presence will be valuable to Uncle 
Sam. Mr. Linn was formerly passenger brake- 
man and extra conductor on this division. 

Charles Blythe, the fifteen year old son of 
C. B. Bh'the, who is in the Company's service 
at Mineral, Ohio, is an orator of promise. 



64 



THE BALTBIORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




STORES DEPARTMENT FLAG RAISING, CONNELLSVILLE, PA., MAY 4 



Recently he made a fine address on 'Tatriot- 
ism." In it he embodied all that civilians 
can do to help the boys "over there." He 
urged upon his auditors to contribute to the 
Red Cross and to buy War Savings stamps. 
He also said that the organizations which are 
arranging social affairs and amusements for 
the soldiers at the camps here and in France 
should have our unstinted support. "Liberty 
and democracy," he said, "must be fought 
for until the autocracy of the world is overcome. 
It is our hope and desire that the last stand 
for autocracy is being made in this war." The 
day after he made his address he entered the 
service of the Company and will continue in 
the Company's employ until school reopens. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

]). V. Stevknh Chairman, Superintendent, Newark 

.1. P. DoKHEY \'ice-Chairinan, Trainmaster, Newark 

C. R. DiEMAK Division Engineer, Newark 

]i. A. Vek.non Road Foreman of lOnsincs, Newy '. 

W. I). Johnston Master Mechanic, Newark 

A R f^LAYTOH Division ('laim Agent, Newark 

D. J. IIoHT T. M. & C. T. D., C;olumbus 

G. I). Mn-LER Shopman, Newark 

Dk. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner, Newark 

F. HAf KENHTOH Gonductor, Newark 

VV. H. RiHHi.EK Fireman, Newark 

L. C. DEfKKH EnKineer, Newark 

(). A. GoLLiNH ' Gar Repairer, Newark 

F. Stkkah Filacksmitli, Newark 

D. 10. Snof.K , Yard (Conductor, Newark 

T. J. Daly Wiis ajjpointed trainmaster, 
Newark Division, h(;ad(juarterH ('ambridgc, 
Ohio, vice J. I*. Dorscy, 1 ransfcrrcd. luffed ive 
May 3. 



On May 3 W. Streck was appointed train- 
master, Newark Division, headquarters Newark, 
Ohio, vice T. J. Daly, transferred. 

On May 3 J. N. McDonald was appointed 
road foreman of engines, Newark Division, 
headquarters Newark, Ohio, vice W. Streck, 
promoted. 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Sup't, Connellsville 
S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 

Connellsville 
C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Ass't Sup't, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

M. H. Broughton Ghairman, Superintendent 

G. M. Stone Assistant Superintendent 

A. E. McViCKER Trainmaster 

A. P. Williams Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

G. N. Gage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dk. F. H. Weidemann Medical Examiner 

G. M. Tipton Freight Agent 

W. G. Garter Freight Agent 

G. A. Albright Freight Agent 

II. B. Pigman Division Operator 

F. T. Robinson Engineer 

A. G. Watson • Fireman 

J. E. Leckemby Gonductor 

J. T. Deneen r Brakeman 

H . T. Robinson Machinist 

J. G. Percy Boilermaker 

S. \\. May Road Foreman of Engines 

J. S. (JiLMORE Trainmaster 

J. .1. Ryland Secretary 

On May 4, at 12.30 p. m., (nnployes of the 
stores departincMit, ('onnellsviUe, Pa., partici- 
I)ated in a flag raising. At the opening of the 
ceremonies, R. P. Reed, storekeeper, intro- 
ducv.d t lie si)cakcra, the Rev. Proudfit and the 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



65 



Rev. Richardson, local ministers, who delivered 
patriotic addresses. A number of patriotic 
selections were rendered by the Connellsville 
Baltimore and Ohio band. The flag was raised 
by Miss Cecilia Friel, stenographer to the 
storekeeper. As the flag reached the top of the 
pole a number of small flags, which were hidden 
from view, descended like a shower upon the 
crowd, while those present sang "America." 

C. A. Cage has been appointed master me- 
chanic, headquarters Connellsville, Pa., vice 
T. R. Stewart, promoted. Effective May L 

Trainmasters, yardmasters, agents and 
others, numbering about fifty persons, met 
with superintendent Broughton, of the Con- 
nellsville Division, and discussed Director 
General McAdoo's universal through way- 
billing of freight innovation, so as to have a clear 
understanding of the new order, effective May 
20. Demurrage will be assessed on all cars 
imtil the shipping orders are in the hands of the 
billing agent. 

Mr. Broughton also discussed the matter of 
Liberty bonds with the new men and urged 
them all to invest as liberally as possible. 

Below is a photograph of F. O. Garlitz, former 
brakeman on Connellsville Division. He is a 
first sergeant and stationed at an aviation camp. 

"The members of the crew of this engine all 
have Liberty Bonds. Have you?" 

This inscription in large letters on a canvas 
streamer appeared on the sides of engine 1109, 
the depot shifter at Connellsville. It at- 




SERGEANT F. O. GARLITZ 




SERGEANT L. A. LEIBERGER 



tracted much comment. The members of the 
day crew are: conductor D. A. Lunnen, engineer 
John Riley, fireman J. Graft and brakemen W. 
O'Hara, G. W. Woodward and Harry Rodgers. 

The depot shifter at Cumberland was simi- 
larly decorated. The local crew went their 
Cumberland brothers one better, as the latter 
specify that they have purchased "a bond," 
while the local crew men attested their patri- 
otism by saying that they purchased not one 
bond but "bonds." 

Above is a photograph of Sergeant (Tony) 
L. A, Leiberger, former brakeman on Connells- 
ville Division, now in Company A, 10th 
Regiment Engineers, "somewhere in France." 
"Tony" just wrote that he now wears a gold 
stripe on his arm, and that he intends to stay 
"Over There" until it is all over. 

The sergeant's Connellsville friends all wish 
him further .promotions and good luck. 

The record of cars moved on the Connellsville 
Division was again broken on Alay 16, when 
seventy-six trains moved 4,549 cars, of which 
2,638 were loaded and 1,911 were empties. The 
number of loaded cars handled per train was 
thirty-four and the average number of empty 
cars handled per train was twenty-five. 

On Saturday May 18 the record was again 
broken when we moved 2,973 loaded cars, being 
the largest number of loaded cars moved in one 
day. The empties moved were 1,147. 

G. A. Nicola, section foreman. Cheat Haven, 
Pa., gathered a keg full of grease plugs amount- 
ing to thirty-seven, ten oil plugs and ten set 
screws, putting them on engine 1383. This is 



66 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



very commendable and superintendent Broiigh- 
ton has expressed his appreciation of the good 
service. 

Thomas Stewart, retiring master mechanic 
of the Connellsville shops, was presented with 
a coffee urn, suitably inscribed, by the di\ision 
office employes. The presentation took place 
in superintendent Broughton's office at 10 p. m.. 
May 19, before Mr. Stewart's departure for Cum- 
berland, where he becomes master mechanic of 
the Baltimore and Ohio shops. The presen- 
tation was made.by dispatcher E. F. Dougherty 

Earlier in the day employes presented Mr. 
Stewart with a gold watch and charm. The 
presentation was made at the shops by C. R. 
Conlon, the master mechanic's chief clerk. 
Mr. Stewart made many friends during his 
brief sojurn here. 

He leaves with the knowledge that he has 
the best wishes of Connellsville Division 
officials and employes. 

In connection with the raising of a flag in 
honor of six employes of the Baltimore and Ohio 
at Smithfield who have entered the service a 
great rally in the interest of the Liberty Loan 
was held there May 19. A parade, a mile long, 
the largest in the history of the place, marched 
behind the Baltimore and Ohio Band of Con- 
nellsville Division, 

During the evening girls from the Connells- 
ville offices sold bonds to the amount of $5,000, 
increasing the total for the community, which 
is a small one, to $20,000. The subscribers were 
almost exclusively railroad men and their 
families. 

The loan campaign and the rally were under 
the direction of J. Scott Gilmore, formerly of 
Connellsville, trainmaster for the Baltimore 
and Ohio, to whom much credit is given. 

Accompanying superintendent Broughton, 
the band and the girls were master mechanic 
T. R. Stewart, assistant master mechanic 
, C. A. Cage and members of the office force. 
Mr. Broughton spoke briefly. The other 
speakers were Mr. Gilmore, Wooda N. Carr 
and A. E. Jones, of Uniontown. The party 
from Connellsville returned home in auto- 
mobiles provided by the people of Smithfield. 

The men who have entered the service are 
Fleming Field, Cecil Clemmer, William Boord, 
William Foye, N. R. Preece and G. W. Still- 
wagon. Th(! flag was donated by railroad men. 

Pittsburgh Division 

Corre.Hfjondent, C.]. Kp:ssl?:ii, Car Accounlant' 
Office, Pittshurjrh 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. J. lUiM)Y .Chuirrnun, Superintendont 

T. W. liAKHKTT Vice-Chuirrriun, Triiiniiiii.s(er 

J. M, McKifi-BAUBR Sccrot.ary 

II. II. .Makhh DiviHion HnKinoer 

M. ('. Tmomphon Road Foreman of J^ngines 

a. W . C Day Divi.sion Operator 

R. B. Stout Superintenflent of Shop.'s 

A. J. Weihc General Car Foreman 

F. HiiYNK Claim Clerk 

W. F. Dknbkb Tc-rminal ARont, I'ittHburKh 

Dr. a. J. HfmHYsn , .Medical Examiner 

G. S. Dir.TA Hrakeman 



One of our most energetic employes, Philip 
Mahon, is on his way to France as an army 
field clerk, Mr. Mahon entered service as a 
stenographer in 1908 on the Cumberland Divi- 
sion. He came to the Pittsburgh Division 
February 15, 1917, as private secretary to 
superintendent T. J. Brady. 

It is needless to say that Mr. Mahon's ab- 
sence will be keenly felt. Everybody liked 
him. He has our very best wishes for a safe 
journey across the Atlantic and a triumphant 
return home in the not remote future. And 
when he returns to us he will certainly be re- 
ceived with open arms. 

Earl Tovey, clerk in superintendent's office, 
has cast his lot with Uncle Sam. He has en- 
listed in the U. S. Marine Corps. 

Mr. Tovey was an all-round athlete while 
attending F. A. H. S. He played third base on 
the Baltimore and Ohio baseball team for two 
years and captained them to championship in 
1916, not losing a game that year. He played 
guard on the football team and was a star 
quarterback of the Pittsburgh Collegians' team 
for three years. He played left field for the 
Collegians and received offers from various 
teams but refused them to play with the Balti- 
more and Ohio. He was not only an athlete 
but was one of the leading stars of the St. 
Stephen's Dramatic Club. 

"Jack'^ Langford, chief clerk to general yard- 
master at Willow Grove, has entered military 
service and is located at Camp Lee, Va. 

Miss Loretta Kinney, our messenger girl, 
has a new job. She is now a real clerk. We 
wish her much success. 

"Jim" Voss, clerk in the general superinten- 
dent's office, has resigned and is now employed 
by H. Koppers & Co. We all miss "Jim" very 
much and wish him much success. 

Night yardmaster "Joe" Williams, of 
Demmler yard, has been at home because of 
illness. His fellow-workers hope for his speedy 
recovery. 

Leroy Cornell and Edward Kenney, both 
yard brakemen, have been drafted into military 
service. Both boys will give a good account of 
themselves when they go to France. 

Brakeman John O'Donnel and conductor 
"Mike" Mulcare are also to be in the service of 
Uncle Sam pretty soon. They expect to "go 
over the top" in a short time. If "Mike" ever 
gets near enough to the Kaiser to give him a 
right hook to the jaw, there'll be a funeral in 
Berlin. 

Engineer Frank Hackett has gone to Ken- 
tucky for the benefit of his health. All sin- 
(terely hope that he will (juickly recover and 
that he will be back in harness again. 

William Brady has been promoted to night 
hostler at Demmler. William is a jovial boy 
and it is hoped that otluu- promotions for him 
will follow ra])i{IIy. Good luck. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



67 



Car foreman W. H. Linsinbigler has been off 
duty for several months because of rheumatism. 
He is back on the job and seems to be getting 
along fine. Welcome back. 

Brakeman James J. Sweeny is considered an 
expert dancer and has captured what is known 
as a "Jazz medal." What's the attraction at 
Braddock, "Jim"? Be careful. 

James Conlin has purchased a Studebaker. 
Good for "Jim." Better watch those police 
traps, though. 

Engineer George Kane has cultivated a war 
garden. Better put a watch dog near it, 
George, for there is a certain gentleman who 
likes radishes and another who eats onions 
greedily. Watch 'em. 



Glenwood Shops 

Correspondent, Frank Rush, Sec'y to Sup't 

Below is a picture of J. A. Shuck, car- 
penter at the Glenwood shops. Mr. Shuck 
has been in the service of the Baltimore and 
Ohio about thirty years and is known by all 
employes at Glenwood. Besides being a vet- 
eran he is a member of the local safety com- 
mittee and the fire department. No matter 
whether he be in bed or at work when the fire 
whistle blows, he is always on the job. 

It was with regret that we heard of the death 
of Mrs. W. W. Bowser, wife of machinist Wil- 
liam W. Bowser, of the Glenwood shops. He 
has the heartfelt sympathy of all the shop boys. 




Pipefitter F. C. Harbaugli has been ill with 
pneumonia for a number of weeks, but we 
expect him back to work soon. 

John Howe has been appointed superintendent 
of shops at Glenwood, vice R. B. Stout, who left 
our service. Mr. Howe is well known at 
Glenwood, having worked here previously as 
boilermaker foreman. He is well liked by all 
the employes and we all wish him success in his 
new position. The employes at Glenwood 
presented Mr. Stout with a present before 
he left. Of course, the presentation speech 
was made by the Rev. McCabe, who is on the 
job on all occasions like this. 

John Applebee has been appointed round- 
house foreman at Glenwood. We were glad to 
hear of his promotion and wish him success in 
his new position. 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYESIMAGAZINE 



The employes at Glenwood shop should get 
busy and give some news to the correspondents 
of the Magazine so that Glenwood will always 
be well represented. How about news on 
Merits? Surely some of our men are perform- 
ing something for which they should receive 
credit and we would like to hear about them, 

C. T. (Pete) Dillow, roimdhouse foreman at 
Glenwood, has taken imto himself a wife. The 
roundhouse employes at Glenwood presented 
Mr. Dillow with a valuable present. Of course, 
the Rev. McCabe was again on the job and made 
the presentation speech. What would w^e do 
without him to make these presentation 
speeches? He sure is some orator. 

Opposite is a picture of W. W. Bosworth, 
formerly pipefitter in the Glenwood roundhouse. 
Mr. Bosworth enlisted in the Engineers' Re- 
serves last June and is now in France. Letters 
are being received from him frequently and they 
all bring the glad news that *'we will get the 
Kaiser." 

John Jones, president of machinists' union of 
Glenwood shops, foimd "one pocketbook con- 
taining a large sum of money." The loser was 
"Dan" Imler, boss carpenter, Glenwood shops. 
Mr. Imler recovered the lost pocketbook 
through the honest}^ of Mr. Jones. 

Born to Mrs. Thomas Hudson, wiie of boiler- 
maker Thomas Hudson, of Glenwood shops, 
a bouncing boy. Both mother and boy are 
doing well. Thomas is a star pitcher on the 
Glenwood baseball team and is well known 
about the shops. 

John Muirhead, blacksmith helper in Glen- 
wood shops, has left our service to go with the 
Corborundum Company, at Niagara Falls, N.Y., 
as assistant purchasing agent. We wish John 
success in his new position. 

The third Liberty Loan drive in Glenwood 
back shops was quite a success. Two noon 
hour meetings were held which were addressed 
by a prominent attorney from Pittsburgh and 
by G. W. Sturmer, of Baltimore. During each 
meeting the music was furnished by the Balti- 
more and Ohio Glenwood shop orchestra. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Choral Club has 
been organized and rehearsals are being con- 
ducted. From all indications this is going 
to prove (juite a success. 

(.'onipliments to all (jllenwood back shop 
f ini)loyes for the mann(!r in wliicli they are re- 
.sj)onding to the various collections being made. 

Uorn to Mrs. W. Z(;iler a bouncing boy. 
\U>t]i inoth(;r and boy are doing well. 

Tlie machine shoj) at Gi(;nwood is always on 
the job. 'I'hey now have a service flag with 
eight stars in it to njpresent uum of that shop 
.who have entered governnH!nt service. The 
7)ipe shop also has a service flag. 

M. 8. Smith, timekeeper in th(; Pittsbiirgh 
office, has tak(!n untf> himself ;i wife. (Jood 
boy, Morrell. 




W. W. BOSWORTH 



Lester R. Clem, wreckman at Glenwood, 
took unto himself a wife, Miss Catherine Alli- 
son, formerly of W^ashington, D. C. Mr. Clem 
treated the boys to smokes. 

The safety committee at Glenwood has been 
reorganized and is making weekly inspections. 
Keep up the good work. 



New Castle Division 

Correspondents 
J. A. Lloyd, Chief Clerk to Superintendent 
C. S. Maynard, Operator, Chardon, Ohio 
V. P. McLaughlin, Operator, BD Tower, Akron 
Junction, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



C. W. VanHorn Chairman, Superintendent 

C. P. Angell Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

D. W. Cronin Division Engineer 

A. H. Hodges Master Mechanic 

T. K. Faherty Road Foreman of Engines 

James Aiken Agent, Youngstown, O. 

Dr. F. Dorset Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne Claim Agent 

F. PL Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahill Division Operator 

W. Dam RON Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Master Carpenter 

J.J. FiSHBURN Secretary 

RoT.\TiNG Members 

E. J. Hunt Road Conductor, New Ciustle Junction 

C C. Anderso.n Road Fireman, New Ca.stle Junction 

S. O. Lewis Road Engineer, New Castle Junction 

N. Thatcher Machinist, New C;istle Junction 

(J. H. CJlenn Yard Engineer, llaselton, O. 

I'\ I). Lancaster Yard Conductor, riunesville, O. 

Miss E. R. Biooehstakf Clerk, New Castle Junction 



M iss Pearl D. Clark . . Chief Clerk to Agent , Youngstown, O. 

J. O. Huston has been ap|)()inted trainmaster. 
New Casth; Division, lieadciuarters New Castle 
Junction, Pa., vice C. P. Angell, promoted. 

J. P. Dorsey has been appointed trainmaster, 
New Castl(! Division, headquarters Willard, 
Ohio, vi(!e J. O. Huston, promoted. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



69 



J. L. Shriver has been appointed road fore- 
man of engines, New Castle Division, head- 
quarters New Castle Junction, Pa., vice T. K. 
Faherty, promoted. 

W. E. Sample has been appointed road fore- 
man of engines. New Castle Division, head- 
quarters Willard, Ohio, vice J. L, Shriver, 
promoted. 

Clarence D. Updegraff, eastbound yard- 
master at New Castle Junction, is wearing a 
particularly happy smile since May 27, on which 
date a young man was ushered into his home. 
The young gentleman will be called Henry 
Howard Updegraff and Clarence will, of course, 
be called ''Dad." 

W. E. McCardell, former yardmaster at 
DeForest Junction, has been called for mili- 
tary service, as has yard clerk K. W. Richards, 
also employed at that point. William D. Reed, 
pensioned yardmaster, has again stepped into 
the breach and is acting as yard clerk until a 
younger man can be secured. Mr. Reed, 
over seventy-one years of age, is enjoying good 
health and able and willing to do his very best 
for the country and for the Company he served 
faithfully and well for forty-one years. 

Below is a photograph of L. L. Anderson, 
formerly operator on the New Castle Division, 
and lately agent at West Farmington, Ohio, 
which was taken while he was home on furlough 
visiting his father, A. C. Anderson, operator 
at East Claridon, Ohio. Mr. Anderson is mas- 
ter signal electrician, 308th Regiment Field 





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Wc cordially invite all employes to inspect 
carefully the advertising now appearing in our 
Magazine. It is our purpose to offer only such 
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70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Signal Battalion, an^ his many friends on the 
New Castle Division will be well pleased to 
hear of his rapid advancement. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, O. V. Kincade, Assistant Chief 
Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. H. Jackson Chairman, Superintendent, Garrett, Ind. 

T.J. Rogers Vice-President, Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

T. E. Jamison Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

John Tordella Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, III. 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind. 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

W. F. MoRAN Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

D. Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

J. E. Fisher Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

Dr. W. A. Funk Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

Dr. C. W. Hedrick Medical Examiner, Willard, O. 

J. D. J.1CK Claim Agent, Garrett, Ind. 

J. F. MiLBURN Act. Sec'y, Y. M. C. A., Willard, O. 

John Draper Agent, Chicago, 111. 

W. P. Allman Agent, Avilia, Ind. 

H. C. Baretta Engineer 

W. J. WiSENBAUGH Fireman 

C. B. Maxwell Conductor 

A. C. Smith Brakeman 

S. R. YiNGLiNG Machinist 

W. G. Mehl Machinist 

J. N. Davis Machinist 

C. F. Wessel Car Inspector 

H. J. Blake Air Brake Repairman 

C. D. Bergstres.ser Yard Brakeman 



Opposite is a photograph of Ernest Crow, 
stenographer to division engineer, John Tor- 
della. Ernest was furloughed March 27 for 
military service and is now stationed at Fort 
Hamilton, N. Y., and reports army life gre^t. 

Account of the vacancy caused by the death 
of former trainmaster T. E. Jamison, train- 




ernest crow 

master T. J. Rogers, east sub-division, was 
transferred to east sub-division; J. E. Fisher, 
road foreman of engines, promoted to train- 




1 LAG HAISi;]) AT WOM' I,AKi: \ Mil), 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 



master, east sub-division; W. E. Frazier, assist- 
ant road foreman of engines, promoted to road 
foreman, and fireman M. E. McCuen promoted 
to assistant road foreman of engines, east sub- 
division. 

James J. Roberts, Chicago Division fireman, 
furloughed for military service, is one of two 
men from Indiana who received a commission 
at the close of the third officers' trainincr 
school at Camp Upton, N. Y. He was assigned 
to the field artillery. 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

On page 70 is a picture of the flag at Wolf Lake. 
Our force there is surely a bunch of patriots. 
On April 22 a fine silk flag 6 x 12, purchased by 
the employes, was raised at that station. 

Agent Altherr, our four minute man, was 
present and in the course of his remarks told 
the men that this flag stood for all the good 
things they enjoyed and that their appreciation 
of these privileges should consist of something 
more than merely lifting their hats or just 
standing when they heard the National Anthem. 

Among the employes called to the colors 
from this station during May are the following: 
Stanley Bejgrowicz, John Staszkiewicz, J. 
Tluziski, H. W. Giesler, W. Armstrong, A. 
Glon, H. J. Blake, Frank O. Carlson, T. J. 
Conroy, A. E. Sleight, D. F. Zern and T. G. 
Conroy. "Joe" Stack, clerk from our office, left 
on May 21. The office force made him a pres- 
ent of a wrist watch. Agent Altherr made the 
presentation speech. "Joe," in responding, said 
he hoped to be able to bring back something 
in the way of a royal souvenir. William 
Hogan, Jr., is another one from our office who 
has entered the radio division at Great Lakes. 

William Frame, engineer of transfer elevator, 
made a trip to New York a few weeks ago to 
see his son, who sailed for France. 

Harry Carr, assistant to chief clerk in train- 
master Huggins' office, was married on April 
16 and is living at Windsor Park. 

We are very fortunate in securing the ser- 
vices of Miss LaVerne Peterson, an experienced 
switchboard operator. 

Miss Florence Cameron, stenographer in 
general foreman Quigley's office, has returned 
from a trip to Washington in the interest of a 
friend leaving for France. 



Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, W. E. Buckmaster, Chief Elec- 
trician, Lincoln Street, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. L. Nichols Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster 

C. P. Palmer Division Engineer 

R. L. Faithorn Assistant Engineer 

Alex Craw Division Claim Agent 

J. A. QuiNN Captain of Police 

C. L. Hegley Examiner and Recorder 

H. McDonald Supervisor, Chicago Division 

William Hogan Supervisor, Calumet Division 

F. K. Moses Master Mechanic 

F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines 

Charles Esping Master Carpenter 




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Please mention our magazine when writing arlvertisers 



72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



NIGHT FIRE BRIGADE, CHILLICOTHE, OHIO, SHOPS 



Dr. E. J. Hughes Medical Examiner 

C. O. SiEFERT Signal Supervisor 

E. J. DoYXE Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

Edward Mattingly General Car Foreman 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

D. M. Julian Car Foreman, Chicago 

Ray Elder Car Foreman, East Chicago 

W. A. MooRE Engine Foreman, Blue Island 

L. R. Shearer Engine Foreman, East Chicago 

J. E. Cartan Engine Foreman, Robey Street 

W.M. H. Curry Locomotive Engineer, East Chicago 

P. S. Pearson Locomotive Engineer, Blue Island 

John Latshaw Locomotve Engineer, Robey Street 

O. Norwood Machinist, Robey Street 

VV. IL Smallman Machinist, East Chicago 

J. McBrtde. Boilermaker, East Chicago 

HoBK/cT Dove Boilermaker, Robey Street 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Oj;crfit()r, DO 
Office, Cfiillicotho, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Cominittee 



E. \V. HoKKMAN Chairman, Superintendent 

I{ . M \i,i,ON Trainmaster 

J. M. MkM(EI,l Road Foreman of Engines 

\V. V . Hayes Master Mechanic 

A. IL Fheyoano ; Division Engineer 

J. fJ. Sklby Medical Examiner 

E. Coi-K Supervisor 

G E. Whahit Agent, Portsmouth, O. 

T.J. Dunkle Conductor 

E W. Foster Brakeman 

C. Deiningeh Engineer 

C. N. Varian Firc^man 

H. M. Cunnfnoham Yard Conductor 

W. F. Ottman Painter Fon^mnn 

G. H. Medert Machinist 



President Willard's western trip in May in- 
cluded a stop at Camp Sherman, on the Ohio 
* Division, where the party was met by General 
Glenn and staff in autos and then driven over 
Camp Sherman, After the trip was made 
through the camp they visited the rifle range, 
where target practice was in progress. After 
arriving at the depot at Chillicothe a special 
train was provided, which ran to Renicks via the 
Norfolk and Western Railroad for inspection 
of new interchange facilities. 

The photograph accompanying this article 
shows the night fire brigade of the Chillicothe 
shops ready for action. Fire chief W. R. Fox 
is shown under mark X. On the night of 
March 31 the oil house at Chillicothe caught 
fire, origin unknown, and the blaze had gained 
considerable headway when the fire alarm 
sounded from the shop whistle. In exactly 
one minute and fifty-six seconds the fire fi.ghters 
had the water on the blaze and in a short time 
had it subdued. The men are to be commended 
for their ciuick and (effective work in st()i)ping 
wh:it might iiave been a disastrous fire, en- 
dangering the entire shoi)H. The city fire de- 
I)artinerit was called, but arrived too late to 
be of service. 

()p(^rator W. C. Pratt and J. B. Brcsnehan 
have joirHMl t he colors. Mr. Pratt has enlisted 
in the navy as a second chtss radio operator, 
Mr. Hresnehan goes to ('amp Sherman. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 



Assistant j'ardmaster E. F. Fisher and wife 
returned from a three weeks' trip in the west, 
visiting Joplin, Mo. ' 'Ernie" has the same ideas 
about vacations that he has about laying in 
his coal — he gets them both early and avoids 
the rush. 

Yard brakeman E. H. Morgan has taken an 
indefinite leave of absence to enlist in the 
United States Marines. 

Vacancies filled on division operator Plumly's 
last bulletin as follows: 

Leesburg, second trick operator, F. A. Ma- 
loney. "SG" office Cincinnati, two tricks, S. 
H. Smith and P. E. Jackson. 

On April 18 and May 8 respectively Michael 
Brown and John L. Fenton, veteran engineers 
on the Ohio Division, were placed on pension. 
The old record of Mr. Brown, familiarly known 
as ''Mike," shows him starting as a fireman in 
March, 1871, being promoted to running in 
March, 1873. 

Engineer Brown holds the record for fast 
passenger running on the west end Ohio Divi- 
sion. With a special train of four cars, carry- 
ing a company of Elks, he made the run from 
Chillicothe to Cincinnati in one hour and forty 
minutes with engine 1419. He made one stop, 
at Loveland, for water. Distance 97.9 miles. 
This record is one to be proud of and has never 
been equaled on this division to the writer's 
knowledge. Engineer Fenton was employed 
in August, 1873, and promoted to supervisor 
of trains and 'engines, Ohio Division, in 1892. 
He was also employed as night storekeeper at 
Chillicothe shops for many years. 

Below is a photograph of C. L. Romine, 
formerly employed on the Ohio Division as 
telegrapher. He enlisted in the signal corps 
October 7 and was stationed at Camp Sherman, 
Chillicothe, Ohio. 





Dofit-stell^E^--^ 
YOU never had a chance! 

"Four years ago you and I worked at the 
same desk. We were both discontented. Re- 
member the noon we saw the International 
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woke me up. I realized that to get ahead I 
needed special training, and decided to let the 
I. C.S. help me. I wanted you to do the same, 
but you said, 'Aw, forget it!' I have been 
climbing ever since; you had the same chance 
I had, but you turned it down. No, Jim, you 
can't expect promotion until you've trained 
yourself to handle bigger work." 



There are lots of "Jims" in the world— in stores, 
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BOX 8 5 10, 

Explain, without obligating me, 
or in the subject, before wliich I 

□ LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER 

□ Locomotive Fireman 

□ Traveling Engineer 

□ Traveling Fireman 
Air Brake Inspector 
Air Bralie Repairman 

_ Round House Foreman 

□ Trainmen and Carmen 
Railway Conductor 
MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

_ Mechanical Draftsman 

B Machine Shop Practice 
Boiler Maker or Designer 

□ Stationary Engineer 

□ Gas Engine Operating 

□ CIVIL ENGINEER 
Surveying and Mapping 
R. R. Constructing 
Bridge Engineer 

_ ARCHITECT 

□ Architectural Draftsman 

□ Contractor and Builder 

□ Structural Engineer 

□ Concrete Builder 

□ TRAFFIC MANAGER 



SCRANTON, PA. 

how I can qualify for the position, 
mark X. 

□ BOOKKEEPER 

□ R. R. Agency Accounting 

□ R. R. Gen I Office Acc'ting 

□ Higher Accounting 

□ Stenographer and Typist 

□ Mathematics 

□ SALESMANSHIP 

□ ADVERTISING 

□ Railway Mail Clerk 

□ CIVIL SERVICE 

□ i:rj:cTKiCAL ExNuineer 

□ Electrician 

□ Electric Wiring 

□ Electric Lighting 

□ Electric Railways 

□ Telegraph Engineer 

□ Telephone Work 

□ mine fokeman on eng r 

Metallurgist or Prospector 
CHEMIST 
_ Al lOMOItll.E OrEIUTING 

□ Auto Repairing 

□ Good English ■□ Spanish 

□ AGItlCUI/nUE !□ French 

□ I'oidtrj' Raising ■□Italian 



8: 



Name 

Present 
Occupatio:i 

Street 
anc" No 



C. L. ROMINE City ■ 

Please mention our magazine when writinfj adi erlisers 



74 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Ohio Division firemen Frank Foster, C. Tippy, 
A. S. Hallett and George Thompson have been 
drafted and will go to Camp Sherman, with the 
exception of Thompson, who goes to P'ort 
Thomas, Ky. 



Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

A. A. Iams Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind- 

J.B. PuRKHiSER Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind- 

H. S. Smith Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind- 

C. E. Herth Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind- 

J. M. Shay Master Mechanic, Cincinnati. O- 

S. A. Rogers Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind- 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind- 

P. T. HoRAX General Foreman, Seymour, Ind- 

E. Massman- Agent, Seymour, Ind- 

.1. E. Sands Agent, Louisville. Ky- 

.1. E. O'DoM Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O- 

F. O. BuNTOx Secretary, Sej'mour, Ind. 

Rotating Members 

V. L. Dowell Fireman, Seymour, Ind 

W. F. Clause Conductor, Seymour, Ind" 

Joe Stewart Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

L. D. Harrixgtox Section Foreman, Blocher, Ind. 

R. C. Moore was appointed agent at Dabney, 
Ind., vice T. R. Moore, transferred. Effec- 
tive May 14. 

F. O. Biinton, secretar}' to superintendent for 
the past several years, accepted a position in 
Cincinnati Terminals, causing the following 
promotions in superintendent's office: 

E. G. Masher, stenographer to chief clerk, 
to secretary to superintendent. 

L. F. Ackerman, clerk, to stenographer to 
chief clerk. 

L. M. Osterman, clerk to division operator, 
to clerk in superintendent's office. 

Miss E. A. Humes, formerly employed as 
stenographer to district engineer maintenance 
of way, Cincinnati, who has several years' ser- 
vice in division offices at Seymour, has re- 
turned to position as clerk to division operator. 

E. C. Harrington, file clerk, has been fur- 
loughed to enter radio service of navy and 
H. J. Himmler promoted to fill this vacancy 
and B. A. Phillips succeeds H. J. Himmler. 

J. I. Tolliver has been appointed agent at 
(icorgia, Ind., vice V. D. Donovan, transferred. 




No. u i'ri,i,i.\(; i.x io .Noin ii \ i;i{.\(>.\ 




FLAG RAISING AT BRIGHTON, OHIO, 
APRIL 6 



T. R. Moore has been appointed agent at 
Huron, Ind., temporarily, vice J. I. Tolliver, 
transferred. 

E. C. Harrington, file clerk in superinten- 
dent's office since September 10, 1917, has ex- 
perienced some little trouble the past few 
months in taking on sufficient weight to make 
him acceptable for service in the Navy, but 
he accomplished the feat and reported at Louis- 
ville for service May 22 for assignment in 
radio service. 

J. R. Bobbitt, with several years' service as 
operator and dispatcher on this division, but 
lately with the Erie at Rochester, N. Y., paid a 
visit to the boys in the division office building 
last week. Mr. Bobbitt is at present in the 
naval telegraph service and his imiform was 
very becoming. 

The Kentucky Derb}- at Churchill Downs, 
May 11, proved to be such a strong attraction 
that several of the young lady clerks in the 
division office building could not refrain from 
making the trip to the Falls City. 

Miss L. E. Brand, with several years' ser- 
vice on various desks, transportation depart- 
ment, and who left the service for a position 
with Seymour Business College, has concluded 
railroad work is more interesting than that of 
the college and has accepted position in office 
of division accoimtant. 

C. E. Morton, chief clerk to division engi- 
neer, has just recently been appointed. general 
athletic representative, Southwest District, and 
H. H. Prinn, signal supervisor, Cincinnati, has 
been api)()inted local chairman, Indiana Divi- 
sion. 

Our management is very much interested in 
this "Welfare" work and there is no question 
but that it will prove very beneficial to all 
ernj)loyes who will participate. 

It has been decided that all bona-fide em- 
ployes, who are candidates for the bas(;ball 
IcaiiiH, will b(! allowed three hours per week off 
duty for which the Kailroad Company will pay 
them at the rate they r(>c(M"v(' in their regular 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



75 



employment. Such teams must be formed not 
later than June 15. Those employes composing 
the teams when they have finally been selected 
will be allowed three hours per week during the 
term of the baseball season, ending on Labor 
Day. 

When the representative division teams are 
obliged to travel from one district to another 
to play off scheduled games, they will be 
allowed the equivalent of their regular wages. 

This division was not represented in the 
baseball activities of the Baltimore and Ohio 
during the 1917 season, and we certainly do not 
want such a thing to occur this year. I am 
quite sure there ^re a number of good ball 
players among the. employes on this division 
who entered service not later than January 1, 
1918 (necessary to have been in service January 
1, 1918, to be eligible to play this year) and if 
not good players now, they have been, and 
there is still a sufficient supply of sporting blood 
to enable them to ''come back." 

We want three or four teams organized on 
this division at once in order that we will be 
able to start the scheduled games on time this 
year, and all employes who wish to play ball 
on one of these teams will immediately make 
the fact known to our division chairman, 
B. H. Prinn, Cincinnati. In applying state 
specifically your qualifications, location, etc., 
so that it may be readily determined in which 
team you are needed, or the most convenient 
location. 

The campaign now is for ball teams; however, 
later on we hope to be able to interest you in 
other Welfare work — bowling, basketball, com- 
munity dances, etc. 

Don't neglect to make your application at 
once for position on one of the ball teams, and 
I am depending upon our best team to play off 
the championship game at Baltimore, Labor 
Day, and secure the cups offered by our 
officers. 

Due to the harmony and excellent organiza- 
tion existing among the men of the night force 
at Storrs station roundhouse, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
a percentage of 100 was reached in six hours in 
the second Red Cross drive by seventy-one 
employes. Two of the night machinists made 
a very artistic and original Red Cross flag 
from a large piece of canvas for a back ground — 
four red classification flags placed so as to form 
the Red Cross with one white flag in the center 
on which some very dainty and artistic decorat- 
ing was accomplished by a blue pencil — in the 
upper left hand corner noting the time of the 
start; in the lower right hand corner the time 
of the finish; in the upper right hand corner 
was attached one of the circular posters "Help 
Our Boys Live" and the lower left hand corner 
a window poster, "The Greatest Mother in the 
World." In the center "Night Force 100%." 
The night force has been highly complimented 
upon the originality of the flag and the earnest- 
ness and interest exhibited in this most worthy 
cause to "Help Win the War" and "Bring Our 
Bovs Hack Home" alive to their loved ones. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, T. W. Calvin, Transportation 
Department 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. T. Horn Chairman, Supervisor of Transportation 

J. H. Meyers Trainmaster 

J. M. Mendell Road Foreman of Engines 

L. A. CoRDiE Assistant Terminal Agent 

Dr. G. R. Garver Medical Examiner 

J. M. Burke Car Foreman 

H. P. HoGAN General Foreman 

G. A. Bowers General Foreman 

T. Mahoney Supervisor 

Rotating Members 
E. R. Hottel Machinist 

H. W. Kirbert Engineer 

C. R. Doolittle Yard Master 

G. Hurdle Inbound Foreman 

R. H. Searls Claim Clerk 

E. T. Horn, supervisor of terminals, is back 
after an absence of several weeks taking mineral 
water baths for rheumatism. We are glad to 
chronicle that his condition shows marked 
improvement. 

J. J. Gallagher, who bears the nickname of 
"Harp," is wearing a great big smile since his 
baby scored "perfect" at the Hartwell baby 
show. Of course, he says the baby resembles 
its father. 

On May 25 there was a flag raising at Smith 
Street freight house. The program consisted 
of patriotic addresses, band music and the 
hoisting of Old Glory. A large crowd attended. 

J. L. Flanagan has been appointed chief yard 
clerk at Elmwood, vice W. A. Richter, 
promoted. 

R. S. Jennings has been appointed relief 
yard clerk. 

Arthur Lauther has resigned position of file 
clerk in office of supervisor of terminals to 
accept a position with the Pollak Steel Co. 

H. B. Smith is a new employe in office of 
supervisor of terminals. He hails from Pitts- 
burgh and is an old Baltimore and Ohio 
employe. 

J. J. Flanagan, troop train expert in office of 
assistant superintendent of transportation, never 
sleeps. At least we think he does not, because 
he is engaged in juggling cars nights as well 
as days. • 

John Perkins solemnly asserts that his new 
baby is the finest one that ever opened its eyes 
in Cincinnati. To prove it he passed around 
a box of fine perfectos. 

D. E. Todd, chief dispatcher, has been 
appointed rules examiner. 

"Sam" Edmonds' timely action probably 
saved the life of a little boy swimming in Mill 
Creek, and who was being carried under by the 
current. Hearing the screams of the boy 
Edmonds plunged in the water and pulled him 
out. After getting the water out of the boy's 
lungs the little fellow started home, not much 
the worse for wear. 



76 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Edward Xicman, tallyman, was called to 
the colors this month and sent to Columbus 
Barracks. Understand he is now working in a 
powder plant in Maryland. 

F. A. Calhoun, of assistant superintendent of 
transportation Hooper's office, has resigned to 
go to the C. & O. as secretary to superintendent 
Taylor. F. O. Bunton, formerly of superin- 
tendent lams' office, Seymour, is now con- 
nected with the office of supervisor of terminals 
at Cincinnati. 



Illinois Division 

Correspondents 
Walter S. Hopkins, Chief Clerk to Division 

Accountant, Flora, III. 
Omer T. Goff, Secretary to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



C. G. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent 

Omer T. Goff Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

J. W. Odum Trainmaster 

R. E. Chamberlain Division Engineer 

W. F. Harris Master Meciianic 

C. H. Creager Road Foreman 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator 

H. E. Orr : Master Carpenter 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor 

M. F. Wvatt Supervisor 

G. H. Singer Agent, East St. Louis 

C. S. Mitchell .Agent, Flora, 111. 

Rotating Members 

W. H. Mullen Engineer 

Paul Nane Y Fireman 

CO. Davis Conductor 

.I.E. BuRRis Rrakeman 

H. C. S.MITH Machinist 

George Quayle Machine Man 

Frank O'Shatz Car Inspector 

Kd Widdows Track Foreman 



The photograph below is that of W. C. Dietz, 
general foreman at Flora, 111., and also manager 
of the Flora Baltimore and Ohio baseball team. 




W. (J. Dii;i z 




FIREMAN C. E. MANN AND ENGINEER 
"JERRY" POPE 



Mr. Dietz entered the service of the Balti- 
more and Ohio in the car department at Wash- 
ington, Ind., November 1, 1896, where he re- 
mained until made joint car inspector with the 
Baltimore and Ohio and Illinois Central at 
Odin, 111., in 1903. In 1908 Mr. Dietz was trans- 
ferred to Springfield, 111., as foreman at that 
point, where he remained imtil 1914, at which 
time he was appointed general foreman at 
Flora. Mr. Dietz had always been an ardent 
admirer of all forms of athletics and in addi- 
tion to his many other duties has always found 
a little time to devote to the interest of the 
Welfare Association. Only a few years back 
Walter ranked well as a ball player in amateur 
leagues which played Sunday baseball, and 
since the organization of baseball on the divi- 
sions has been quite a fan. Through the influ- 
ence of superintendent Stevens, Mr. Dietz has 
taken charge of the baseball team at Flora 
for the coming season and there is no doubt 
but that the team under his management 
bids well to compete for the championship at 
Baltimore on September 2. 

The photograph above is that of fireman 
C E. Mann and engineer "Jerry" Pope. This 
picture was taken at Flora just after the arrival 
of these two men with engine 876 with the Lib- 
erty Loan Special, a train of exhibits of war 
relics. 

A meeting of all employes interested in 
baseball was held in the general foreman's 
office at Fh)ra on May 3. Division chairman 
Hopkin.s explained the baseball situation on 
the Illinois Division, at the same time making 
a report as to the financial situation and dis- 
(•usH(>d the matter of purchasing paraphernalia 
needed. Manager Dietz took full charge of 
the team, arranged to have the grounds put 
in proper shape and division accountant P. H. 
(Iroscuj) having been appointed secretary 
and treasurer of the association, took charge 
of t he finances. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 



On May 4 Thomas M. Stevens, father ()f 
C. G. Stevens, died at his home at Sunnier, Illi- 
nois. Mr. Stevens was past eighty-two years 
of age and had for some time been in poor 
health. The funeral services were held from 
the M. E. Church at Sumner, on Sunday, May 5, 
a special train being run from Flora to Sumner 
and return to accommodate the employes and 
their families who desired to attend the fimeral. 
The floral offerings sent by the employes w^ere 
beautiful and superintendent Stevens was very 
grateful for the remembrances, also to the train 
and engine crews that volimteered their services 
to rim the special train. 

History tells us of some wonderful exploits, 
deeds of daring, etc., but the trip made by divi- 
sion accountant Groscup in his new Paige 
from St. Louis to Flora is more wonderful even 
than fiction. The numerous experiences had 
by ''Phil" while on this trip are being pub- 
lished in a separate book, they being too 
thrilling for the Magazine. The trip was 
started on Friday and it seems that the 
weatherman whispered to "Phil" that every- 
thing would be lovely. However, shortly after 
departing from St. Louis the God of Thunder 
evidently had on a grouch, for he immediately 
stirred up the atmosphere to such an extent 
that the rain poured and the roads became 
exceedingly muddy. After leaving the popu- 
lated portion of the country and entering into 
the rural districts "Phil" states it was extremely 
lonesome. It was very interesting to hear 
related the many experiences; most every gar- 
rage found something wrong with the machine 
that needed immediate attention, and the gaso- 
line tank seemed to have holes in it. We have 
information that the self-starter was not prop- 
erly charged when leaving St. Louis, thereby 
making it necessary for "Phil" to crank the 
car something less than a thousand times. 
The self-starter has now been fixed and every- 
thing is lovely, and "Phil" is very much sur- 
prised at the number of friends he has since pur- 
chasing his new touring car. 

Just a little note as to the loyalty of the 
division accountant's office — one hundred per 
cent. Third Liberty Loan Bonds; one hundred 
per cent. Red Cross; one hundred per cent. 
War Savings Stamps. On the south side of the 
office hangs the service flag, now containing 
four stars, representing four good American 
soldiers who have or will go to the western 
front from the division accountant's office and 
there's nothing too good for them. We're in 
for one hundred per cent, on anything that will 
help them through. 

Looks rather suspicious, five of the boys have 
sent their wives out of town on a visit at the 
same time. Of course, they are all retiring at 
the usual hour and will all have the same story 
when she returns — "My how I missed you." 

Owing to material clerk Smith being called 
in the draft, C. F. Stanford has been employed 
as junior clerk in "the division accoimtant's 
office. 



Miss Maud Russell, who has be(«n off sick 
for some time, has returned to work. 

We had the pleasure of having with us for 
several weeks Charles H. Harker, traveling 
timekeeper. Ask "Charley" how he washed 
his face in the morning. 

W. S. Hopkins, chief clerk to the division ac- 
countant, has made his regular semi-annual 
trip to Cincinnati to buy a hat. Panama this 
trip, 

F. A. Conley, chief clerk to the superinten- 
dent, says that when he does buy a car it sure 
is going to have a self-starter. There is no 
question but that Frank will be the possessor 
of a machine soon, at least the indications are 
such. The greatest problem now is the kind. 

"Dimmy" Workman, who for sometime has 
been employed as messenger in the division 
offices at Flora, told us the other day that he 
had some important business in St. Louis. 
Nothing was heard from him for three or four 
days then we received a card from him saying 
that he had enlisted in the marines and was 
at that time at Paris Island, S. C. It's "all 
off" with the Kaiser now. Go to it "Dimmy," 
we are with you. 

Traveling auditor A. L. Carney has purchased 
a new auto and is spending a whole lot of time 
looking over the roads and now knows how 
most of them look around here. We under- 
stand that when he bought the machine he 
started to drive it out here from St. Louis and 
after getting about half way discovered that 
the machine was not equipped w^ith a sub- 
marine attachment or was not fitted up to 
float, so he decided to lay up for the night. 

Lyman Riggle is now working as messenger 
in the division offices at Flora, vice M. C. 
Workman, who has joined the marines. 

One fine evening Henry Bruner, file clerk in 
superintendent's office, and R. O. Dykins, train- 
master's clerk, decided to go fishing. The next 
day they reported having caught about twenty 
fish, averaging about two or three poimds, 
and by the way they talked we have our doubts 
as to whether or not there are any fish left in 
this part of the country, except the small ones 
they threw back in the water. They claim that 
this is not a "fish story" about their big haul. 
We imderstand that Henry had a little trouble 
climbing over a barbed wire fence. 

There was so much rain here last spring that 
some of the boys gave serious consideration to 
trading their automobiles for submarines. 

A few days ago brakeman Robert G. Herrin 
left for Camp Dix, N. J. Everybody was 
sorry to see him leave and all wish him good 
luck. 

Live stock agent E. R. Walsh, of East St. 
Louis, left a few days ago for Camp Taylor, Ky. 

Some of the other fellows who have enlisted 
in Uncle Sam's service are engineer W. N. Hill, 



78 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



switchman H. F. Reimer, yard conductor I. 
Sullivan, brakeman Don Clark and brakeman 
A. R. Harris. 

Chief dispatcher C. F. White has purchased 
a new Overland auto. He says that in running 
it he does not have to worry about terminal 
overtime, deadheading or relieving crews, 
also says he is not delayed by the block or by 
meeting points very often. The machine also 
helps him get awa}^ on call. 

Yard clerk C. G. Weiss, who was laid up 
with pneumonia for sometime, is now back 
on the job at Cone and reports feeling a great 
deal better. 

Conductor BadoUet is back on the west end 
coal train job he ''held down" several years ago. 
He says business at the mines on the west end 
has been hibernating long enough. 

Dispatcher F. J. Smith has been away for 
two weeks on a vacation and has just returned 
to work. Understand he bought out a big 
business of some kind while he was gone. He 
was relieved by extra dispatcher C. D. Russell, 
who is now working for dispatcher T. R. Cox, 
who is away on his vacation. 



Washington, Ind., Shops 

Correspondent, J. R. Minter, Sho'p Draftsman 

Sometime ago we advertised for ''Senator 
Dick," the fuel inspector. "Senator" made his 
appearance a short time ago at this station, and 
relieved the suspense, as we thought something 
had happened to him. 

"Joe" Yeager, pipefitter, went fishing. 
Enough said, gentlemen, enough said. 

Work has been started on the twenty-foot 
extension to be made to the engine house at 
this point. 

The young lady clerks employed in the offices 
here are organizing a tennis club. We expect 
to see many exciting contests. 

Russell Isenogle, formerly a clerk in the 
general foreman's office, enlisted in the army 
and is located at Camp Laurel, Md. Russell 
has three brothers in the service, Alva, P^lva 
anrl Leo, all of whom were clerks in the employ 
of flie Baltimore and Ohio. 

J. Harold Bourgholtzer, statistical clerk in 
su|)erintendent of shops' office;, left for ('amp 
Zachary Taylor, Ky., May 27, for service in 
the National Army. 

Frederick J. IVice, M. B. clerk in the 
general car foreman's office and F. J. Stone, 
shii){)ing cl(!rk in stores department, left for 
Columbus Jiarracks, May '2'.i. 

We are pleased to present above 1 fu; likeness of 
T. R. Mayfi(!ld, laf)or(!r in the enginehouse. 
Mr. Mayfield is a very pleasant gentleman and 
filways has a kind worrl for cvf'ryone. 




1 , U. -MAVJ Ii:]JJ 



Toledo Division 

Correspondent, F. M. Drake, Relief Agent 
Dayton, Ohio 



R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent 

E. J. CoRRELL Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

H W. Brant Trainmaster 

F. J. Parrish Division Engineer 

I. E. Clayton Division Operator 

M. DiBLiNG Machinist. Lima, O. 

Edward Keefe Road Engineer, Ivorydale, O. 

T. J. McDfrmott Road Conductor, Dayton, O. 

H. T. Heilman Secretary to Superintendent, Lima, O. 

Dr. F. H. Hutchinson Medical Examiner, Lima, O. 

Dr. R. C. Potter Medical Examiner, East Dayton, O. 



The following employes have responded to 
the call of our country, and with last informa- 
tion were at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio: 
F. B. Redman, operator, Bates, Ohio; R. E. 
Young, operator clerk, Perrysburg, Ohio; 
M. M. Hemmert, agent-operator, Botkins, 
Ohio; C. L. Jenkins, operator. Bates, Ohio; 
A. G. Patterson, operator, Ottawa, Ohio. 

A matter of historical importance is the 
remodeling of the old stone building at Stockton 
station. This building was erected fifty-two 
years ago as a water station, the tank being 
constructed of wooden staves and steel hoops, 
and placed on the inside of the stone building, 
setting on pillar stones. l'\)r a long time no 
one has given it. enough attention to look into 
it until it was decided to put it in shape to be 
used as a section bunkhouse. Workers pro- 
nounce the masonry as ij) apparent perfect 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



79 



condition, the steel hoops in good contact, 
while the only evidence of the wooden hoops 
is the accumulated dust. 

Probably one of the most important matters 
in the way of construction work is the two 
and one-half miles of track now nearing com- 
pletion, which, beginning at the curve known 
as Tates Point, located on the Wellston Sub- 
division, between Lebanon Junction and East 
Dayton, extends to a point near North Dayton 
coal dock on the Toledo line. 

It was necessary to cross both the C. C. C. 
& St. L. and Erie Railway tracks at grade, 
and the construction of two complete inter- 
locking plants, also ten public road and street 
crossings. 

The most extensive portion, proportionately, 
was the structure, necessary to span the old 
Miami and Erie Canal and Mad River, being a 
two thousand foot bridge of trestle and steel 
construction. The entire grading is almost 
level, with few curves, the greater being only 
six degrees. 

The proposition not only opens up a most 
inviting .field for commercial locations, the en- 
tire territory being almost level, with Mad 
River near by for a water supply for any man- 
ufacturing plant or plants who desire to locate. 



but from a transportation stand point will 
eliminate many serious delays to both railroad 
and street traffic because of the great volume 
of tonnage that will pass over this line instead 
of the Dayton joint track. 

In order to be able to take care of a large 
volume of this traffic two more large yards are 
under construction and no doubt will be com- 
pleted by the time our readers get this, one 
known as Needmore the other Leo Street. The 
former will have a capacity of 500 and the latter 
900 cars, with an additional passing siding con- 
structed in connection with the former. A 
standard yard office of Baltimore and Ohio 
specifications, which provides wash room and 
sanitary facilities, is also being constructed. 



Sandy Valley & Elkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, L. E. Gatewood, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. R. Laughlin Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenship ... .Section Foreman 

S. H. Johnson Engineer 

E. E. Cassidy Fireman 

J. M. Moore Conductor 



Our Sweetheart 

By Minna Irving 



We saw her in the happy years 

Before her smiles had turned to tears, 
A dainty, charming, gay coquette, 
Who danced the graceful minuet 
With dusky tresses curled, 

Perfumed and powdered and arrayed 

In filmy lace and rich brocade, 

With love and laughter in her glance 
And kisses on her lips — fair France, 
The sweetheart of the world. 



We see her wan and wasted now, 

A bloody rag about her brow. 

Her feet and bleeding bosom bare. 
Dead roses in her tangled hair, 
Her cheeks with tears impearled. 

The Hun has laid his heavy hand 

Upon her beauty, joy is banned, 

She has forgotten how to dance. 
To laugh, to sing— alas ! poor Fran 
The sweetheart of the world. 



But courage! O'er the rolling sea 
The flower of Western chivalry. 

The knighthood of the U. S. A., 
All armed and eager for the fray, 
With starry flag unfurled; 
A million strong and more to come. 
To music of the fife and drum, 

Like cavaliers of old romance. 
Are hurrying to rescue France, 
The sweetheart of the world. 



80 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



/^5l Stones 



% Stories 



12 



r>\ete ' 



xed; . 



Go\d 
274 



tops; 



long 



red 
\d tops- 



Finish This Story For 
Yourself — 

The girl got $6 a week and was lonely. " Piggy " — you 
can imagine his kind — ^was waiting downstairs. He knew 

where champagne and music could be had. But that night she didn't 
go. That was Lord Kitchener's doing. But another night ? 

12 

Volumes 



0. HENRY 



tells about it in this story, with that full knowledge 
of women, with that frank facing of sex, and that clean 

mind that has endeared him to the men and women of the land. 
From the few who snapped up the first edition at $125 a set before it 
was off the press, to the 120,000 who have eagerly sought the beautiful 
volumes offered you here — from the professional man who sits among 
his books to the man on the street and to the woman in every walk of 
life — the whole nation bows to O. Henry — and hails him with love 
and pride as our greatest writer of stories. 

This is but one of the 274 stories, in 12 big volumes* 
you get for 27% cents a week, if you send the coupon 



To Those Who Are Quick 

KIPLING Volumes 

GIVEN AWAY 



Never was there an offer like this. Not only do you get your 274 
O. Henry stories in 12 volumes at less than others paid for one volume of 

the first edition, but you get Kipling's best 179 short stories and poems and his long 
novel — without paying a cent. You get 18 volumes, packed with love and hate and 
laughter — a big shelf full of handsome books. 



Send the 
CouponWith 
out Money 



Send the Coupon and you will 
understand why O.Henry is hailed 
as " The American Kipling." 

From East to West; from North 
to South ; by all the peoples of the world, 
O. Kenry has been eagerly seized upon 
as their own. The milUonaire and the man 
who stoically wonders where the next mouth- 
ful is coming from, the budding debutante, 
and the wayward sister, all feel in common 
the kindly touch of the human heart in O. 
Henry's stories. One and all have felt that 
at last here was the chance to see the hearts 
of every kind of person, to get a world of 
pleasure, and a library of the best and most 
worthy literature obtainable. 



Send the Coupon and you will 
understand as never before why 
other nations are going wild over him. 

Why memorials to him are being 
prepared ; why universities are planning 
tablets to his memory ; why text books 
of English literature are including his 
stories; why colleges are discussing his 
place in literature ; why theatrical firms 
are vying for rights to dramatize his 
stories: why newspapers all over the 
country are continually offering big 
sums for the right to reprint his stories. 



We will ship the complete 

sets so that you can look them 
over in your home and then de- 
cide whether or not you wish 
to buy. If you are not delighted 
with O. Henry and the free 
Kipling notify us and we will 
take the sets back as cheerfully 
as we sent them. How could 
any proposition be more fair? 

The Cloth Binding 

If you prefer the set of O. Henry 
in cloth bindincchange pricejl9.50 
to$\SAX), and change monthlypay- 
ments from $1.50 to $1.00. There 
is so small a difference however 
bf twcen the price of the cloth and 
the beautiful half leather that we 
Rtrongly urife our customers to 
buy the haltUather, 



FOLD HERE, TEAR OUT. SIGN AND MAIL 



INSPECTION COUPON 

THE RIVERSIDE PUBLISHING CO. 

543-549 Marquette BIdg.. Chicago. Ililno's 

Please ship me on approval the Works of O. Henry, 12 volumes, half lea' ner 
l)inrline, gold tops. Also the 6 volumes set of Kipling bound in silk cloth. If I 
krcp the books I will pay you $1 00 as first payment within 10 days after books 
arc received and fl.SO per month until your special price of $19.50 for the O. 
Henry set only is paid, and it is agreed I am to retain the Kipling set without 
tliarge. If not satisfactory I will notify you within 10 days and return both sets 
to vou as soon as you give nie shipping instructions as oflered readers of 
The Baltimore and Ohio lunployet Magazine. 



Name 



Address- 



Occupation— 



I'lcaHc nicntioii (nir iikujuzuk: when writimj advcrlif^rrs 



(Committee on Public Information) 



\ ASSEMBLING U. S. ENGINES IN FRANCE I 



AUGUST, 1918 



FOOD AND THE MAN 



A well-balanced and 
nutritious meal costs 
no more than a poorly 
planned one. A roast 
is not always possible, 
but there are many 
cuts of meat which 
may be boiled, broiled, 
stewed or roasted and 

— _ — — — " ' I will cost less than the 

meat which goes into the frying pan. Ask mother to give you a boiled dinner 
or a stew oftener. 

Fish is recommended for several meals each week. Graham bread is superior to 
rye, and rye is preferable to white bread, both as a food and as a health agent. 

Fruit is not a luxury but a necessity, and in the months when too expensive 
for a large family, use prunes, evaporated apricots, peaches, apples, etc. 

Milk or buttermilk is preferable to coffee or tea, but hot food or drink should 
be served twice each day. If tea and coffee are served, use in moderation. Give 
children cocoa or milk. 

Pie, cake, doughnuts, 
etc., clog the bowels 
and put your system 
out of order. Eat 
only enough dessert 
to satisfy craving for 
sweets. Serve oftener 
and eat less at a time. 

( I'hotoHriiHrli'Mi/ KitKhnttn Kodnk Co. ) 



Plmxe mcnliitn our nKUfdzine ivhcn irn'lifKj (i(lvertisers 





THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



1 



[ip'illlll' 

[l,.i„;illl 




Get Ready for 

"Old-Timers' Shoots" 

Trapshooting has its "old-timers" — veterans 
of the game for fifteen or more years. By at- 
tending shoots, serving as officials, increasing 
the membership, instructing new members, promoting 
club events and otherwise serving the club, they've been 
the "old reliables" whose loyalty rightly deserves recog- 
nition by fellow-members and sportsmen everywhere. 

Show these "old-timers" you are appreciative of their 
work to make trapshooting the "sport alluring." 

At the Gun Clubs 

members and officials will give you a royal welcome. 
You can take part in "Old-Timers' Shoots" and be eligible 
for the trophies provided for the participants in this 
national event in honor of trapshooting's worthy veterans. 

Club officials should make arrangements now to con- 
duct an "Old-Timers' Shoot" in May or June. Write 
to Sporting Powder Division for complete information. 
Use the coupon. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

Wilmington, Delaware. 

NOTE— When in Atlantic City, visit the Du Pont 
Products Store, Boardwalk and Penn. Avenue, and 
Trapshooting School on Ocean End of Young's 
Million Dollar Pier. 



The Du Pont American Industries Are: 

E. I, du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, Del., Explosives. 
Du Pont Chemical Works, New York, Pyroxylin and Coal Tar 
Chemicals. 

Du Pont Fabrikoid Co., Wilmington, Del., Leather Substitutes. 
The Arlington Works, 725 Broadway, New York, Ivory Py-ra-lin and 

Cleanable Collars. 
Harrison Works, Philadelphia, Pa., Paints, Pigments, Acids, Chemicals. 
Du Pont Dye Works, Wilmington. Del., Dyes and Dye Bases. 




MAIL THIS COUPON 

Marking X Before Subject 
of Interest and Send Address 
to Adv. Div., Du Pont Co., 
Wilmington, Delaware. 



□ "Old -Timers' Shoot" 

□ Sporting Powders 

□ Trapshooting 

□ Explosives 

□ Blasting Supplies 

□ Harrison Paints 

□ Auto Finishes 

□ Vitrolac Varnish 

□ Bridgeport Wood Finish 

□ FABRIKOID 

□ PY-RA-LIN 

□ Commercial Acids 

□ Metal Preservatives 

□ Bronze Powders 

(Baltimore & Ohio Employes Magazine) 



iiiniii j 



illl'llll 
illlllllit 



iiii.iii:iia:i;:ii:riiiiiii:::iii]im i 






•) p:iii:cii:i::]|]i::ii:]ii:ii:iii:iid^^ E| 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



2 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Some of the Properties Owned by the Savings Feature 
of the Relief Department 

Which May be Purchased on the Monthly Rental Plan 



WESTON, W. VA. 

(About Half Mile From Town) 
1 story and attic frame dwelling, 7 rooms 
and pantry, slate and metal roof, stone 
foundation, lighted by gas. Lot 60 x 235 x 
413.5 X 424 feet. Price $2800.00. 1-10 cash, 
balance in monthly instalments. 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

r SUBURBAN) 

3306 GRACE AVENUE 
(About 2 blocks west of Reisterstown Road) 

6 rooms, bath, electric lights, furnace 
heat, city water. Lot 25 x 115 feet; ground 
rent $60.00. Taxes $23.25. Price $1200.00. 




GARRETT, INDIANA 

411 SOUTH PETER STREET 
Lot 30 feet by 125 feet. If -story frame 
dwelling, stone and brick foundation, 9 
rooms, city water; also barn. Price $1700.00. 
1-10 cash, balance in monthly instalments. 




McMECHEN, W. VA. 

SIXTH (OR GRANT) STREET 
Lot 1 and part of lot 2, J. A. Miller's 
addition, 40 feet 8 inches by 42 feet. 2-8tory 
frame dwelling, 8 rooms, brick foundation, 
city water, lighted by gas. Price $2500.00. 
1-10 cash, balance in monthly instalments. 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




FLORA, ILLINOIS 



AUSTIN STREET 

4 rooms, city water and sewer, shingle 
roof, concrete foundation. Lot 74 feet by 
208 feet. Price $1000.00. 




MIDLAND CITY, OHIO 

6 rooms and out building, shingle roof, 
stone and brick foundation. Lot of about 
one-third of an acre. Price $600.00. 



ST. JOE, INDIANA 



MAIN STREET 

19 rooms, shingle roof, brick foundation. 
1 out building 10 feet by 12 feet. Lot 100 
feet by 150 feet. Price $1600.00. Suitable 
for hotel or large boarding house. 




GARRETT, INDIANA 

SOUTH PETER STREET 

8 rooms, gas and electric lights, city water 
and sewer, shingle roof, brick foundation. 
Lot 50 feet by 125 feet. Price $1450.00. 





Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



4 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Where to Spend Your Vacation 



Employes are urged to patronize the advertisers in these columns when on vacation. 
They promise to extend a cordial welcome to Baltimore and Ohio employes. 



Atlantic City, N. J. 



Try 








Clarendon 


A favorite house with Balti- 
more guests. 

Half block from Steel Pier. 




Hotel 


Boardwalk and all principal 
places of amusement. 




Virginia Avenue, near Beach 


Open surroundings. 




Atlantic City, N. J. 


Elevator. Electric lights. 




Rooms, single or en suite, with 






private baths. 






All rooms have hot and cold 






running water. 






Careful service. 






Write for rates and booklet. 






Ownership Management. 




Open All Year 


MONROE HUTCHINS 









Allegheny Mountains 


Virginia Beach, Va. 


ON THE TOP OF THE ALLEGHENIES 

Brookside Inn and Cottages 

10 miles from Oakland. Md,. and 3,000 feet above sea 
level. Best of everything -write for booklet. 

E. J. KIRKPATRICK, Manager 
OAKLAND, MD., POSTOFFICE 


The Pocahontas and Annex 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 

The Pocahontas is located directly on the Ocean Front 
in the center of the most popular portion of the beach. 
Large Verandas and Every Modern Convenience. 
CUISINE EXCELLENT 
For rates apply MRS. A. B. WILLIAMS 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 




BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



BALTIMORE. AUGUST. 1918 



Number 4 




CONTENTS 

Appointments Announced by Federal Managers 7 

William T. Manning, Former Chief Engineer, Dies 9 

A Romance of the Old Main Line 13 

Act of Kindness Brings Unique Reward 17 

United States Railroad Administration Bulletins 18 

Shipping Board Chairman Tells Value of Ship Building 19 

The American Melting Pot 21 

"S'teen Little Thrift Stamps" 22 

"A Bit of Laughing Gas" 23 

Don't Cough, Don't Sneeze, Don't Spit 24 

Wilson's Call to Freemen Death Knell to Kaiserism 25 

Our Worst Enemy, Carelessness 26 

Passing of Grafton Roundhouse 27 

The American Red Cross Aims 29 

Safety Lesson from the Arctic 33 

Pins Is Pins 34 

Baseball Activities 35 

Editorial 40 

Service Flag Poems 41 

Letters From Our Men in France 43 

Statement of Pension Feature 46 

Sergeant T. H. Wales Killed "Over There" 47 

I Was Just Thinking Miss Floy Whitmore 48 

Fire Prevention Message From President Wilson 50 

Home Dressmaker's Corner 51 

Book Reviews 55 

Safety First Roll of Honor 56 

Among Ourselves 59 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write on one side of the sheet only. 




6 



Appointments Announced by Federal Mana- 
gers of Eastern and Western Lines 



H. W. THOMPSON, Federal Mana- 
ger for the Allegheny Region, 
has announced a number of 
appointments that affect the 
Baltimore and Ohio Lines, East, and 
the new officials are now in their re- 
spective offices. The Federal Manager 
also realigned a number of divisions of 
the Baltimore and Ohio and other rail- 
roads that are under his control. 

The appointments, effective July 1, 
were as follows: 

R. N. Begien, assistant to Federal 
Manager (operating), with headquarters 
at Baltimore. 

J. M. Davis, Manager Baltimore and 
Ohio New York Terminals, with head- 
quarters in New York. 

S. Ennes, General Manager Baltimore 
and Ohio-Eastern Lines and of the Coal 
and Coke Railway, with headquarters in 
Baltimore. 

M. C. Byers, General Manager Western 
Maryland Railway, Cumberland Valley 
Railroad and Cumberland and Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, with headquarters at 
Hagerstown, Md. 

A. Fries, Traffic Manager, with head- 
quarters in Baltimore. 

F. H. Clark, General Superintendent 
Maintenance of Equipment, with head- 
quarters in Baltimore. 

H. B. Voorhees, General Superinten- 
dent Transportation, with headquarters 
at Baltimore. 

E. M. Devereux, Treasurer, with offices 
at Baltimore. 

H. R. Preston, General Solicitor, with 
offices at Baltimore. 

H. A. Lane, Chief Engineer, with head- 
quarters at Baltimore. 

W. S. Galloway, Purchasing Agent, 
with headquarters at Baltimore. 

J. J. Ekin, General Auditor, with head- 
quarters at Baltimore. 

E. E. Hamilton, assistant to Federal 
Manager with office at Baltimore. 



In his announcement concerning the 
new boundaries of districts, Mr. Thomp- 
son states the following: 

The Potomac District is created, con- 
sisting of the following: 

Cumberland Valley Division — Cum- 
berland Valley Railroad, Western Mary- 
land Railway between North Junction, 
Hagerstown, Md., and Shippensburg, Pa.; 
Edgemont, Md., and Quinsonia, Pa.; 
Philadelphia and Reading Railway be- 
tween Shippensburg, Pa., and P. H. & P. 
Junction (Harrisburg, Pa.) ; Carlisle and 
Gettysburg, Pa. 

Hagerstown Division — W e s t e r n 
Maryland Railway from Virginia Avenue, 
Cumberland, Md., to Baltimore, Md., 
except portion included in Cumberland 
Valley Division; Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad, Weverton, Md., to Hagers- 
town, Md. 

Elkins Division — Western Maryland 
Railway, Virginia Avenue, Cumberland, 
Md., to Elkins, W. Va., and Belington, 
W. Va.; Cumberland and Pennsylvania 
Railroad. 

The Charleston Division is hereby 
created, embracing the line from Charles- 
ton to Elkins, W. Va., including branches, 
and that portion of the Monongah 
Division, W>ston to Pickens and Rich- 
wood. 

The West Virginia District is extended 
to include the territory as above outlined. 

The Coal and Coke Railway, which 
extends from Charleston, W. Va., to 
Elkins, W. Va., and branches, will be 
operated as a part of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad. 

The Western Maryland Railway be- 
tween City Junction, Cumiberland, Md., 
and Connellsville, Pa., will be operated 
as a part of the Connellsville Division 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

Officers and employes will report to 
the superintendent at Connellsville, Pa. 

On July 10 Mr. Thompson announced 



7 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



that the Western Maryland Railway Ter- 
minals at Baltimore will be operated as 
a part of the Baltimore Division, Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad. 

On Western Lines 

C. W. Galloway, Federal Manager of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Western Lines, 
also announced the same day a number 
of changes that likewise went into 
effect July 1. Unless otherwise stated, 
the headquarters of the new officials 
will be Cincinnati, Ohio. 

F. A. Deverell becomes assistant to 
the Federal Manager (accounting). 

As general solicitor, Morison R. Waite 
has been named. 

C. L. Thomas becomes traffic manager. 

L. G. Curtis, formerly district engineer 
of the entire Baltimore and Ohio System, 
becomes chief engineer. 

S. U. Hooper is named superintendent 
of transportation. 

W. S. Galloway, named purchasing 




STANDARD TRACK ON INDIANA DIVISION WEST OF SEYMOUR (LAY-OVER) 



agent by Federal Manager Thompson 
for the Eastern Lines, will also be the 
purchasing agent for the Western Lines. 
His headquarters will be in Baltimore. 

E. M. Devereux will serve likewise 
for the Western Lines as treasurer, with 
headquarters in Baltimore. 

J. J. Ekin becomes general auditor of 
the Western Lines also, with head- 
quarters in Baltimore. 

E. W. Scheer becomes general super- 
intendent of the Northwest District, 
with headquarters in Cleveland, Ohio. 

F. B. Mitchell assumes the duties of 
general superintendent of the Southwest 
District. 

J. B. Carothers is made assistant to 
the Federal Manager. 

Mr. Galloway announces in his orders 
that the Northwest District will embrace 
the Chicago, Newark, New Castle and 
Cleveland Divisions. 

The Southwest District will embrace 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Toledo Divi- 
sions, and Dayton and Union Railroad. 



f 



William T. Manning, Formerly Chief 
Engineer of Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad, Dies Suddenly 



HE sudden death on July 8 last 
of William T. Manning removes 
one of the most efficient railroad 
engineers in the country and 
his many friends over the Baltimore and 
Ohio System, of which he was chief 
engineer for some years, will be deeply 
grieved to learn of his passing. 

Starting with the railroad as rodman, 
he arose through different grades until he 
became the chief engineer. He after- 
wards engaged in private practise of his 
profession and up until the time of his 
death was studying inventions that 
might be of value to the railroads. He 
is best remembered as the engineer who 
carried to a consummation the building 
of the Belt Line Railroad, which passes 
beneath the heart of Baltimore and which 
was a clever piece of engineering in- 
genuity. 

Mr. Manning, whose father also was 
a construction engineer on the railroad 
and who carried through several big 
undertakings, entered the employ of the 
Baltimore and Ohio as rodman in 1873. 
He was assigned to the Chicago Division 
and served there until 1880. Having 
obtained practical experience in his 
chosen profession, his father took him 
as an assistant in the construction of 
the Gunpowder tunnel for the Baltimore 
City water works. 

He returned to railroad work on the 
completion of the water system and 
became resident engineer of the Somerset 
and Cambria Railroad and later held 
the same position with the Ohio and 
Balthnore Short Line. He next was 
resident engineer for six months with the 
Rochester and Pittsburgh Railroad and 



following that went to the Wheeling 
Division of the Baltimore and Ohio in 
the same capacity. 

From 1883 to September, 1886, he 
served as assistant master of road for the 
Pittsburgh Division of the Baltimore and 
Ohio and from September, 1886, to July, 
1887, was superintendent of the Ohio 
Division. From the latter date until 
October, 1890, he was engineer main- 
tenance of way on the Pittsburgh 
Division. Following this assignment he 
went to the Staten Island Rapid Transit 
road as chief engineer and served simul- 
taneously in the same capacity for the 
Akron and Chicago Junction branch of 
the Baltimore and Ohio. The latter 
road was being constructed and Mr. 
Manning showed much skill in getting 
the hne through. He also served as engi- 
neer in charge of the construction of 
the new terminals at Pittsburgh, which 
he designed. 

From April 5 to October 19, 1892, he 
served as assistant chief engineer of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, also 
discharging the duties of chief engineer 
during the absence of Henry T. Douglas, 
who went to Europe to regain his health. 
From January 31, 1894, until March 10, 
1899, he was chief engineer of the rail- 
road and also of the Pittsburgh and 
Western. From April, 1896, to the time 
he severed his connection as chief engi- 
neer, he also was in charge of the mainte- 
nance of way of the Baltimore and Ohio 
lines east of the Ohio River. He served 
as consulting engineer until December 1, 
1900. 

Mr. Manning was born February 10, 
1856, at Alexandria, Va., coming to 




9 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



11 



Maryland with his parents when very 
young and completing his education at 
Glenwood Institute, Howard County. 
He was of a most practical turn of mind 
and one of his early achievements was 
the designing of angle bars, which, he 
maintained, would give greater safety 
to trains. Instead of having the heads 
of the bolts holding the angle bars to 
the rails all pointing in one direction, he 
alternated them in a ''staggered" man- 
ner. He also designed the Manning 
Rail, by which the standard rail was 
changed by making the head heavier, 
adding metal on the side of the head 
next the flange of the wheel, thus pro- 
viding greater wearing quality, especially 
on curves. 

Mr. Manning married Isabelle B. 
Hewson, of Philadelphia, about twenty- 
one years ago. He is survived by a son, 
William Hewson Manning, and a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Addinell M. Hewson, and four 
brothers, Charles T. Manning, formerly 
an engineer of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad, Joseph T. Manning, Sidney T. 
Manning, also at one time in the employ 
of the railroad, and Powell T. Manning. 
Mr. Manning was buried July 11 in Green- 
wood Cemetery, Baltimore. The honor- 
ary pallbearers were A. W. Thompson, 



Federal Manager of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Lines, East; Findley H. B. Bullock, 
Cleveland P. Manning, Dr. George A. 
Hocking, Wilbur T. France, Augustus 
Bradford and George E. Cuttle. 

Edgar A. Legare Passes Away 

HVERYONE in the Freight Claim 
Department was deeply grieved 
at the death of Edgar A. Legare, 
one of the most faithful and 
efficient employes in this department. 
When the minister who conducted the 
funeral services said of him: "He per- 
formed the duties of his office with fidel- 
ity and to the best of his ability," he 
summed up all the characteristics that 
had impelled Mr. Legare. The minister 
was speaking of Mr. Legare's work as 
deacon of a country church, but he put 
the same energy into his business with 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which 
he served for sixteen years. He was a 
big, cheery type of man, one that his 
friends in the office called "Eddie," just 
to see him smile. He died early on the 
morning of July 3 and many of the mem- 
bers of the office force attended the 
funeral. 



The Bravest Battle By Joaquin Miller i i 

i I 

' """ i I 

I I 

The bravest battle that ever was fought, | f 

Shall I tell you where and when? j j 

On the maps of the world you will find it not ; | j 

'Twas fought by the mothers of men. i i 



I Nay, not with a cannon or battle shot, But deep in a walled-up woman's heart- 

I With sword or nobler pen ; Of woman that would not yield, 

I Nay, not with eloquent words or thought, But bravely, silently bore her part- 



11 



i i 



From mouths of wonderful men ; Lo, there was the battle field. || 

I I 

No marshaling troops, no bivouac song, 

No banner to gleam and wave ; 
But, oh! these battles, they last so long, | | 

From babyhood to the grave. I I 

I I 

Yet faithful still as a bridge of stars, O, ye, with banners and battle shot, j | 

She fights in her walled-up town — And soldiers to shout and praise, j j 

Fights on and on in her endless wars, I tell you the Kingliest victories fought, | | 

Then silent, unseen— goes down. Were fought in these silent ways. § | 



NOTICE. 

€a €mhuim anJj d^nginemcn Jirst f ibisron, 



0)1 and after the Xst of Odoher next, Tonnage Trains West, whm delayed, ivill 
Ofdi/ have tintil 12 o'clock and 50 minutes to make Plane No. 1 for Eastuard hmnd 
Tonmifje Trains, instead of 1 o'clock and 30 minutes. 

Tonnage and Delayed Coal Toains East will he governed hy the folloiviwj Time 
Table, between Plane Xo. 1 and Ellicott's Mills, uhcn Twimujc Trains have not all 
passed West: . 

T .A- S E - 

Plane No. I, Leave i2M P. M. 

Guilher'8 Siding, , . . ' . . . Arrive 1.30 

, Leaoe l,'S5 " 

Sykesville, . \ ; 1.43 

Mi.rnotisville, " 2.10 « 

Wootlstock, '< 2.22 « 

Klysvilie, . '•' 2.50 M 

Eilicoira Mills, •< 3.20* '* 

Thte Ride for Dehujed Coal Trains bound East leaving iJwse Stations on Prompt 
Book Time, only applies when Westward Ixmnd Tonnage Trains have all passed West. 
If they have not pxissed, the Delayed Coal Trains East will comply .with the above: Table 
for running Tonnage Trains East. 

If the Easttmrd bound Trains hare not all passed East, the Wc.snrar<l bomul 
ToHTiage Trains tviil full back on Coal Train Time West. 

Conductors and Enginemen w?7/ /jewr vii?ul, thM this Special Arrangement 
only ap/jlies beivjeen Delayed Tonnage and Coal Trains on Single Track heiivem Plane 
No. 1 and Ellicott's Mills. 

WM. S, WOODSIDE, 

Master of Transporiaiion. 
By ALEXANDER DIFFEY, 

. JiuUlant Supervisor of Train). 

Septembek 26, ISSO. 



A Train Order of Yesteryear 

Gone are the men who issued and those for whose guidance the above was distributed. The 
circular from which the photographic reproduction was made was recently found among some 
old papers in the possession of J. E. Spurrier, who forwarded it to the President's office. 
William S. Woodside, master of transportation, whose name appears on it, was known to the 
railroad men of the 50's as "The Doctor." Mr. Diffey's activities are recited in the article 
appearing on the next page, an interesting story of his elopement with the daughter of one 
of our first eneinemen. 



A Romance of the Old Main Line 



Thomas Spurrier, Sr., and his Fascinating Daughters Linked 
with the History of Baltimore and Ohio in its Early Days 



WiHEN Peter Cooper, pioneer loco- 
motive builder in America, secured 
some unmounted gun barrels from 
' a maker in New York, brought 
them to Baltimore and assembled them 
into an upright boiler, mounted it on 
an odd-looking platform resting on wheels 
and announced that he was ready to 
haul a car from Baltimore to Ellicott's 
Mills, the first division of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, many persons pre- 
dicted the project would not be success- 
ful. This was in the year 1830. 

However, there was one observer who 
welcomed the invention — none other than 
the little fellow whom artists portray as a 
beautiful naked boy, winged, armed with 
bows and arrows — ''Dan" Cupid. The 
god of love saw in the ''wood burner," 
which was to supplant the "hay burner" 
(the horse), a device which would be 
instrumental in assisting him to enslave a 
number of hearts. 

Among the first to operate a steam 
locomotive on the Baltimore and Ohio 
was Thomas Spurrier, Sr., who lived at 
Plane No. 4. Born September 15, 1802, 
when quite a young man he drove a team 
over the National Highway, the pike 
between Baltimore and Wheeling. With 
the building of the first link of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad he realized that 
he would have unconquerable competi- 
tion and he left the pike and entered the 
service of the railroad as teamster. He 
later was promoted to fireman and then 
to engineman. 

Mr. Spurrier had four daughters, three 
of whom married men who served as 
firemen on his engine. One of them 
married twice, her second husband being 
a Baltimore and Ohio man. 

"Dan" Cupid had a staunch and re- 
sourceful ally in Mr. Spurrier. 

It was in the 40's that one of his fire- 
men, Alexander Diffey, was promoted 



to engineman. Mr. Spurrier's nephew, 
Thomas Spurrier, succeeded Diffey as fire- 
man. The last named was in love with 
Mary Spurrier, both being about nineteen 
years old. They decided to elope to 
Baltimore and took young Spurrier into 




THOMAS SPURRIER, Jr. 



their confidence. He consented to assist 
his cousin and prevent his uncle from 
interfering. 

The day of the elopement arrived. 
Spurrier Senior and Spurrier Junior 
started with their engine for Monocacy. 
The elopers planned to board the Fred- 
erick train east at Plane No. 4. It was 
up to young Spurrier to delay his uncle 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



on their return trip in order to give 
Diffey and Miss Spurrier a good start. 

He thought of many methods, such as 
allowing the steam pressure to go down, 
etc., but finally decided to remove a 
pin from the washer on the left side of the 
engine and watch for it to drop off. 
At Hartman's water station the pin was 
withdrawn. The engine was quickly 
oiled and, opening the throttle, Thomas 
Spurrier, Sr., had visions of making 
Plane No. 4 on time. 

His nephew, meantime, was keeping an 
eye on that washer and he thought it 
never would fall off. However, just be- 
fore reaching Bartholow's water station 
he saw it drop and called his uncle's atten- 
tion to it when the stop was made to take 
water. The engine was backed off at Bar- 
tholow's. Then began a hunt for the 
washer. While this was in progress the 
elopers boarded their train. They arrived 
in Baltimore and were married at once. 
When young Spurrier felt sure that the 
Frederick train east had pulled out of 
Plane No. 4, he found the washer. 

Rise of Diffey 

Alexander Diffey was made traveling 
engineer about the time of his marriage. 
In 1852 he was promoted to assistant 
supervisor of trains and about the same 
time John R. Smith (grandfather of 
Federal Manager C. W. Galloway) be- 
came supervisor of machineiy, a new title 
for traveling engineer. When Joseph 
Brown, supervisor of trains, resigned 
he was succeeded by Mr. Diffey, whose 
jurisdiction covered the territory from 
Baltimore to Wheeling. 

B. L. Jacobs was appointed assistant 
supervisor of trains, with headquarters 
at Grafton. During the Civil War 
Jacobs was captured by the Confederates 
and taken to Fort Donaldson. Mean- 
time Diffey had received a commission 
in the Union Army and he was given 
permission to visit his former assistant 
at the prison. Shortly after his return he 
was stricken with smallpox and died 
eight days later, October, 1863. 

During the summer previous to his 
death A](;xandor Diffey narrowly escaped 
capture })y the rebels. He was then 
living ;it Mt. Airy. Thi^. (confederates 



raided the place and two of Stuart's 
cavalrymen rode up to the Diffey home 
and asked for him. They pretended that 
they were Union soldiers and had an 
important message to deliver. 

Mrs. Diffey recognized one of them, 
'^Billy" Dorsey, who was a former 
schoolmate. While she stood in the door 
talking to them, her husband kneeling 
behind her directed that she state that 
he had left during the afternoon on a 
special train and would not return for 
several days. 

During the conversation Mr. Diffey 
and a telegraph operator, Edward Mason 
or Charles Damon, climbed through a 
trap door and hid between the ceiling 
and roof. The Confederates believed the 
story and went away disappointed, as they 
had been previously informed by a 
Southern sympathizer that Mr. Diffey 
was at his home. 

Before leaving they compelled road 
supervisor John Hipsley, track foreman 




ALEXANDER DIFFEY 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



15 



John C. Duvall, Charles Etchison, John 
Cline and several other employes of the 
Company to tear up the rails and ties 
and throw them down a ninety-foot 
embankment. 

While this was in progress Alexander 
Diffey and the operator left the house and 
went over the hills to Plane No. 1, where 
they came up with several trackmen with 
a hand car, which took them safely over 
the single track to Marriotts ville. Here 
they got in touch with Baltimore and an 
engine was sent out to bring them from 
the danger zone. 

Alexander Diffey is said to have enjoyed 
the distinction of being the first employe 
elevated to an official position. He also 
fired the ''Mt. Clare," the first engine 
built at the shops bearing that name. 
He had six sons and two daughters. 
Two of the boys died at Mt. Airy at an 
early age, but the others lived to learn 
the machinist trade at Mt. Clare. Later 
they left for the west and southwest. 
Two have since died, while one is now 
living in Kansas and the other in Texas. 

Another Daughter Elopes 

The elopement of Mary Spurrier was 
not the only one in her family. Her 
sister, Susanna, did hkewise less than 
six months after Cupid put the first 
one over on Thomas Spurrier, Sr. After 
being married in Baltimore, Mr. and 
Mrs. Alexander Diffey made their home at 
28 South Poppleton Street. While visit- 
ing her sister. Miss Susanna left the house 
one morning to go to a store and purchase 
a loaf of bread. Another visitor at the 
house at that time was Thomas B. Spur- 
rier, a first cousin of Mrs. Diffey and 
Miss Spurrier, who also had acted as 
fireman of the engine run by his uncle, 
Thomas Spurrier, Sr. 

When Miss Susanna started for the 
store she wore a house dress, pasteboard 
bonnet and a calico apron. When she 
returned she was Mrs. Thomas B. Spur- 
rier. To their son, J. E. Spurrier, who 
has rounded out fifty-four years in the 
service of the Baltimore and Ohio, hav- 
ing served in various positions from fire- 
man, telegraph operator, supervisor of 
trains, trainmaster and superintendent 
of a division, we are indebted for the 



facts in this article. ''Mr. John Ed," 
as he is affectionately called by hun- 
dreds of men who have grown gray in 
the service, is beyond doubt the best 
posted man in the Company's employ so 
far as matters relating to the pioneer 
days of railroading is concerned. 

But romance still lived in the family. 
Emily Jane Spurrier was the next one to 
hear the call. She was married to John 
William Baker, engineman of old No. 55, 
a Winans short-furnace camel, running 
between Mount Clare and Martinsburg 
(First Division). Mr. Baker came from 
his father's farm near Plane No. 4 to the 
Baltimore and Ohio as fireman and was 
soon made an engineman, passing Plane 
No. 4 engine house (the home of Emily 
Jane) every day and it was not long 
before the whistle of No. 55 played allur- 
ing tunes as it bumped on its way, and at 
each toot Emily Jane cast whistful eyes 
in the direction of the passing engine. 
Daddy Spurrier many times had to 
arouse Baker from his reveries to more 
practical occupation, such as stoking the 
boiler of old No. 55, but Cupid knows no 
barriers and on November 27, 1856, Mr. 
Spurrier lost his third daughter and 
again one of his firemen swore marital 
allegiance. 

The wedding ceremony was scheduled for 
seven o'clock in the morning. The pros- 
pective bride and groom wanted to catch 
the famous Frederick accommodation, of 
which William Norris was the chief. Mr. 
Spurrier's fouith daughter, Catherine, 
came into the engine house where Daddy 
was fondling his engine and wishing that 
he could find the lair of ''Dan" Cupid, who 
had caused him no end of worry, and 
exclaimed : 

"Pap, you and John wash your greasy 
hands and come to the house to see Em 
married. She is waiting for you." 

"Pap" was busy with the spring pack- 
ing at that moment, and as he raised his 
smudged face he replied: 

"Oh, the devil. Ain't they married 
yet? Tell them to go ahead. We can't 
come for this engine must be ready to 
push the Fast Stock up the hill. " 

Catherine departed, for she did not 
want to miss that ceremony. Mr. Spur- 
rier and his helper did not see the cere- 



IG 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



morty. On his return from his wedding 
trip Baker traded his old No. 55 for one 
of the Company's engines, No. 76, which 
was drawing the construction train that 
was used in double-tracking the Old 
Main Line. He contracted typhoid fever 
and died in the summer of 1858. He left 
no children. 

Cupid Still Busy- 
Then Brook Buxton appeared on the 
horizon and entered into the romance 
willy-nilly. He left a Frederick County 
farm and became a fireman on the Old 
^lain Line. He first was assigned to No. 
119 and it was not long before he, too, 
learned to toot the whistle of his loco- 
motive as he passed Plane No. 4 in a 
fascinating way. He asked for a transfer 
to Plane No. 4 to fire No. 170, as he put it 
officially in his communications, but 
really to be near Widow Baker. 

Things were going merrily until the 
Confederates and Alexander Diffey's 
woolly dog Jack interrupted a courtship. 
Mosby's Raiders were operating around 
Point of Rocks and Baltimore and Ohio 
rolling stock was ordered rushed to 
Baltimore. Buxton was assigned to help 
in the preparations, and he saw an oppor- 
tunity in the confusion to make des- 
I)erate love to the widow. He implored 
the fair widow for a kiss, but got only a 
ixjjection. Then he attempted to get 
on(i a la Mosby Raiders, and was in a fair 
way to o})tain his desires when the woolly 
(log Jack took three or four inches off the 
trousers that Buxton was wearing. The 
lir(;man had no time to make repairs to 
the trousers, as the Raiders were reported 
to Ik; nearing every hour. He came to 
J Baltimore with the torn trousers leg 
stuff (id into his boots. 

In about Um days the dang(;rous 
Raid(irH liad movod to other conquests 
and liuxton n.'turncd to his own. One 



V — 

I 

I 

) 

) 




BROOK BUXTON, Jr. 



frosty morning good dog Jack was found 
dead hanging to a tree behind the engine 
house. The road clear, Buxton renewed 
his suit and soon the fouilh Baltimore 
and Ohio man became a member of the 
Spurrier family and Mrs. Baker changed 
her name to Buxton. He lived to be a 
pensioned engineman. He left four sons 
and three daughters. 

Three of the sons became telegrai)h 
operators in the service of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad. ''Fred" Buxton still 
is an operator at Reels Mill and Mrs. 
C'ariie Mullinix is the only surviv- 
ing daughter. She is living at Plane 
No. 4. 



) 



— ^1 



**The man who says he Can't is right about it" 



Act of Kindness Brings Unique Reward 
to Passenger Agent of Baltimore 
and Ohio at Chicago 



I V lINDNESS is more than a virtue 
xV J nowadays. The Hun has tried 
f^^^l to relegate that attribute, which 
L rw^ l has been the world's most cher- 
ished possession since the days of the 
Savior, who preached and practiced 
''Love thy neighbor as thyself,'' to the 
Land of Forgotten Things. Selfishness 
and jiate are more prevalent today than 
ever before and when an act of unusual 
kindness happens one is wont to look 
upon it almost with reverence. 

It has been one of the working com- 
mandments of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad that kindness and consideration 
should be given every passenger. An 
agent at Chicago recently put into prac- 
tice this tenet and it brought him many 
heartfelt thanks and at the same time 
won for the railroad the life-long grati- 
tude of a lady and her husband. 

He'll tell you that he feels that he has 
done a noble deed. He'll verify the state- 
ment that kindness repays a hundred-fold. 

A few weeks ago one of our representa- 
tives in Chicago received a communica- 
tion from Hot Springs, Ark., requesting 
the reservation of a stateroom fiom 
Chicago to Newark, N. J., via the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad. The letter 
was signed with the name of an army 
officer, but apparently was written by a 
lady. The message was answered imme- 
diately, stating that the Baltimore and 
Ohio did not run a through sleeping car 
from Chicago to Newark, N. J., at that 
time, and suggested, as the army officer 
was an invalid, it would be best to use 
the Pennsylvania Lines, which operated 
a sleeping car from Chicago through 
Newark to New York City. The /letter 
added that if the passengers still desired 
to use the Baltimore and Ohio, the 



necessary^ arrangements, transfers, etc., 
would be* made with pleasure. 

A reply was received to this letter to 
the effect that the passengers had round- 
trip tickets and must travel via the 
Baltimore and Ohio. The passenger 
representative made the necessary reser- 
vation of a stateroom, giving the car 
number, train, date, etc., and a stateroom 
from Washington to Newark on the 
Pennsylvania Railroad. Copies of his 
letter were sent to the lines over which 
the passengers would travel and to the 
station passenger agents at Chicago and 
Washington, suggesting that the pas- 
sengers be met with an invahd chair. 
All of this was done as a mere matter of 
a day's business. 

The passenger man, following up the 
correspondence, went to the station to 
ascertain whether all of his arrangements 
had been carried out to the satisfaction 
of the travelers. Upon entering the 
sleeper, he was met, by a motherly lady 
of mature years. The agent introduced 
himself and the lady fell upon her knees 
and kissed his hand. He was much 
embarrassed, but she said that she could 
not help it. She informed the agent 
that the treatment she had received was 
so different from anything she and her 
husband had experienced, that she knew 
of no other way of expressing her appre- 
ciation. She stated that her husband 
was an invalid, almost helpless, and that 
all of the correspondence was handled 
by herself. 

The passenger man had a friend on 
the train who was a surgeon in the navy, 
whom he brought in and introduced to 
the couple, and the surgeon placed him- 
self at their service for the rest of their 
journey. 



17 



United States Railroad Administration 

Bulletins 



Wire Manager Named 

The United States Railroad Administration authorizes the following: 
CIRCULAR No. 14. 

Martin H. Clapp is appointed manager, telegraph section, division of oper- 
ation, with office in Southern Railway Building, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Clapp will have supervision over telegraph and telephone lines belonging 
to the railroads under Federal control. 

C. R. GRAY, 

Director Division of Operation. 



Ruling on Per Diem Claims 

P. S. A. CIRCULAR No. 13 

In the matter of the reporting, charging, and collection of per diem, as pro- 
vided for in General Order No. 31 : 

The question has been asked as to whether per diem reports, charges, credits, 
and collections which accrued prior to July 1, 1918, should be discontinued. 

The order contemplates that per diem reports, charges, credits, collections, 
reclaims, and all claims in reference to per diem other than those due to arith- 
metical errors, up to and including June 30, 1918, shall be continued as heretofore, 
and that the provisions of the order relate only to accruals on and after July 1, 1918. 

C. A. PROUTY, 

Director Division of Pubiic Service and Accounting. 



Universal Mileage Scrip 

Director General McAdoo authorizes the following announcement: 

There will be placed on sale on or about August 1 a universal mileage scrip 
at the basic rate of 3 cents per mile. 

Each coupon of the ticket will represent the value of 3 cents and can be used 
for the payment of sleeping and dining car charges and transportation of excess 
baggage, as well as transportation charges on all trains on railroads under 
Government control. 

The advantages of this simple form of ticket are obvious, and the change is 
expected to relieve the pressure on ticket agencies at busy centers. 

The war tax will be collected by conductors at the time of the presentation 
of the mileage scrip. 



Shipping Board Chairman Tells Value of Ocean 
Delivery Service to Average American 

By Edward N. Hurley 

Chairman United States Shipping Board 



HMERICAN business has the best 
dehvery service in the world — 
for customers at home. The de- 
partment store not only delivers 
a spool of thread to a remote suburb on 
schedule, but delivers it through an inter- 
locking system of motor trucks, hght 
vehicles, branch distributing stations and 
wagon routes, which speed up service and 
cut costs. The manufacturer and jobber 
reach their customers by flexible railroad 
service extending from the loaded freight 
car to the emergency express shipment to 
fill out missing stock numbers — and if 
these do not suffice they get closer to the 
customer with branches. This typical 
American dehvery service has been ex- 
tended to soil products, like California 
oranges, Colorado cantaloups, north- 
western red apples, Florida grapefruit, 
Georgia peaches. By means of the re- 
frigerator car and modern grading and 
packages, new trade has been built by 
serving new customers in new ways. 

But all this delivery development is 
for our home trade. No country in the 
world hauls a ton of freight on the rail- 
roads as cheaply as we do. No country 
in the world has linked up such vast 
territory as ours on a modern delivery 
basis. Almost anything we raise or 
manufacture anywhere in the United 
States can be hauled profitably, quickly, 
right side up, in good order — at home. 
We are not daunted by distance, bulk, 
expense, or diflSculties. If one delivery 
method won't work, we invent another. 
But always for ourselves. 
When we have prime American pro- 
ducts to deliver to a foreign customer, it 
has been our practice thus far to call in 
the rusty ocean tramp steamer, turn the 
job over to a foreigner, and forget about it. 
Iniagine a great factory or- department 



store with no delivery system for its cus- 
tomers. When goods are packed, the 
shipping clerk steps to the door, whistles 
for any old expressman or teamster, and 
hands the goods over to him. That is 
what we have been doing in foreign trade. 
The more dilapidated the expressman's 
rig, and the cheaper his bid on the job, 
the better we thought it. 

Meanwhile, the Briton and the German 
have been reaching some of the best trade 
in the world by the best ocean-delivery 
service. We started our jobbing team- 
ster to South America with our goods and 
forgot all about him. He promised to 
get there as soon as he could. While he 
was on the road, the Briton and the 
German sped past him with fast delivery 
trucks of the latest type. 

25,000,000 Tons of Ships 

But the war is going to change all this. 
When we get done with our job of making 
the world safe for democracy, we will 
have 25,000,000 tons of merchant ships, 
or the equivalent of England's mercantile 
marine, which is the largest. Today, 
we are building ships for war. But each 
improvement in war shipping brings its 
corresponding improvement in merchant 
shipping. A year ago we would have 
been glad to get our hands on ships of 
any size or type, and our hopes were 
centered on a large fleet of wooden 
steamers of moderate capacity. Today, 
while still keeping all our wooden ship- 
yards busy, we have increased the size 
to 5,000 tons, and now know that most 
of this wooden tonnage will be kept in 
coastwise trade, releasing the steel ships 
for the war zone. Where we were glad 
to get steel ships of 5,000 to 7,000 tons 
a year ago, now we are building them in 
8,000 and 10,000 ton types, and planning 



19 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



troop ships of 12,000 and 15,000 and even 
20,000 tons, with speeds of sixteen to 
twenty knots an hour. 

It is none too early for the American 
business man to begin thinking of these 
ships in terms of modern dehvery service 
to foreign customers. And not the busi- 
ness man alone, but the farmer, the con- 
sumer, the community — the whole Ameri- 
can Nation. We must get ships into 
our thinking, and planning, and work, 
just as we have got railroads into the 
American consciousness. 

When the war ends, there will be work 
for ships all over the world. Peace will 
soon make the British mercantile marine 
as strong as ever. The Norwegians and 
Japanese are building ships. The Ger- 
mans will undoubtedly rebuild their 
mercantile marine. So it is possible to 
look ahead and see times coming when 
we must compete with these nations. 
And we shall never hold our own unless 
both our ships and our foreign trade are 
organized along the efficient lines that 
facilitate business at home. 

We must have ships running to all our 
customers in Latin America, the Pacific, 
and Europe on regular delivery schedules. 
Germany had the greatest international 
dc^partment store delivery system in the 
world before the war. See how her mer- 
chant marine was tied up in foreign har- 
])oi-s. The Hamburg- American hne had 
ill 1913 a total of 192 ships, and with 
these ships it covered seventy-four regular 
s1(;amship routes. The North German 
Lloyd had 133 ships, and its regular 
routes covered practically the whole 
world. British shipping is on the same 
Ijasis of regular routes and regular de- 
liveri(;s. We would not undertake to 
give service to customers at home with- 
out our fast freight lines, express facilities, 
and sp(^cial cars for sp(;cial goods. We 
can not hop(; to g(^t close to fon^ign (ms- 
tornc^rs, and k(.'(^p closer, and giv(; services, 
unless w(^ organize our new shii)s to run 
on legular rout(3S and eni})0(ly tlu; idea 
of r(!gular service into the new foicign 
trade which w(; must build. 

Will be Vital 

l((guiai' sci vicr; on icgular ste;i,nisliip 
routes will be vitally necessai'y if we arc; 



to hold our own either in shipping or ex- 
port trade. 

The other day a steamship man in my 
office painted a somewhat gloomy picture 
of after-war shipping rivalry. Our war 
wages and higher costs would make it 
impossible to compete with British, 
Japanese, Norwegian and German ships, 
he feared. 

^'Suppose we run our ships on regular 
lines to all foreign countries where trade 
can be built," I suggested. "Suppose 
that instead of keeping the traffic on a 
basis of cheapness and irregular sailings, 
we extend our fast railroad freight serv- 
ice to the ocean, and afford American 
business men the same facilities for 
reaching customers abroad. Suppose we 
also carry passengers on combination 
cargo and passenger ships, and make it 
easy for those customers to visit our 
markets, just as the southern and western 
merchants visit Chicago and New York. 
Would that overcome the disadvantages 
of cheap ocean competition?" 

'^That is our only salvation," was his 
reply. 

It is not only our big opportunity for 
holding our own in shipping competition, 
but it is the only businesslike way to 
build up foreign trade. You may take 
past statistics of our foreign trade to 
different countries and see regular de- 
livery service and export trade growing 
together. Because steamship service to 
Europe was on daily schedule we were 
able to deliver our goods to customers 
there as regularly as we sent them over 
the border to Canada by our railroad 
service. Because West Indian and Cen- 
tral American countries could be served 
by our coastwise ships on regular sched- 
ules we built lasting and growing trade 
with these neighboring nations. And on 
the same principle, because our steam- 
ship service to South Anu^-ic^a, Australia 
and the Orient was iirc^gular, when it 
(existed at all, and in the control of com- 
petitors r(^a(;hing those countries by regu- 
lar lines, our sales were spasmodic; and 
unbalanced by retiu'ii shipments of J'aw 
materials. 

Now we are i-a])i(lly building tlu; 
niech.'Uiical (^luipnienl, for icgulai" ste.'ini- 
shi]) lin(>s all over the world. The fast 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



21 



troop ship can be converted for combined 
passenger and cargo service and placed 
on regular lines, reaching the whole of 
Central America, South America, the 
Pacific, and the British Colonies. We 
shall undoubtedly have our own liners 
to Great Britain, European, and Medi- 
terranean ports. Our refrigerator ships, 
now carrying meat and dairy products 
to feed the allies,- will carry meat, fruit, 
butter, eggs, and perishables to other 
countries. Our cargo ships can be or- 
ganized on the triangular system, which 
has made British and German shipping 
profitable. That is, a British ship left 
Wales with a cargo of coal for South 
America, picked up a cargo of nitrates 
for the United States, and returned with 
a cargo of wheat to England. Thus 
British export and import trade were both 
facilitated, and on the third leg of the 
triangle the British ship did a delivery 



job for a foreign nation, thus adding to 
tonnage and revenue. If 25,000,000 tons 
of American shipping can be kept busy 
in our own export and import trade, then 
the development of this third leg in the 
triangle will keep 30,000,000 to 35,000,000 
tons of American shipping employed. 
That is the tonnage which I estimate will 
be needed by the United States after the 
war. 

To keep this great new merchant 
marine busy we must have a radical 
change in American business thinking. 
Every manufacturer and trader in the 
United States, every banker, farmer, 
miner and consumer must begin to think 
now about American merchant ships as 
a great modern international delivery 
service. No longer must we be content 
to let our railroads stop at the ocean — 
they must be extended to reach clear 
around the globe. 



n □ □ 



The American Melting Pot 

Some Odd Happenings in Our Country and Abroad 



HMERICAN army cooks in France 
recently baked a ton of foot powder 
into bread, mistaking it for flour. 
Charles M. Schwab, as the direc- 
tor of ship-building in the United States, 
will have under him over 450,000 men. 

The Red Cross is calling on American 
women to keep on knitting — but to con- 
fine their efforts chiefly to socks. 

Germany has limited the amount that 
prisoners may spend to $15 a week for 
officers and $12.50 for privates. 
■ Charles S. Hamhn, of the Federal Re- 
serve Board, says that " compared with the 
Kaiser, Sitting Bull was a philanthropist. " 

Senator Sherman of Illinois says, ^'our 
laws are being administered largely by 
social settlement workers rather than 
statesmen." 

Chicago women are organizing a move- 
ment to do without hats throughout the 
sumuK^r and to contrilnite the saving to 
the lied Ci'oss. 



In Vienna a quarter of the population 
are living on the rations of the public 
kitchens and the city deficit for last year 
was $7,500,000. 

The American Museum of Natural 
History in New York has a food exhibit 
showing how one can have three meals a 
day for thirty-four cents. 

A British army officer making a round 
of the historic sights in Philadelphia 
found ''Made in Germany" on the ther- 
mometer in Independence Hall. 

It is said that ships being fabricated 
under the Shipping Board control are to 
be named by the President's wife, and 
that she advocates Indian names. 

Chauncey M. Depew, at his eighty- 
fourth birthday dinner, said that two- 
thirds of his friends had died of over- 
eating and that a good rule for dinner is 
to 'Haste everything, but eat only the 
roast." — From. Ledte/fi. 



S'teen Little Thrift Stamps 



By R. H. R. in "Women's Wear" 



Bought a little thrift stamp — 

Pasted on a card. 
''There goes a quarter — 

And quarters come hard." 

One little thrift stamp, 
Lookin' lonely, blue; 

Bought one for comp'ny, 
Then there were two. 

Two little thrift stamps, 
Couldn't seem to 'gree, 

Got 'nother to watch 'em, 
Then there were three. 

Three little thrift stamps — 

How' 11 1 get more? 
Walked 'stead of ridin', 

We'n'sday had four. 

Four little thrift stamps 

All in a row — 
Started me to thinkin' 

How to make 'em grow. 

Cut one cigar a day. 
Miss it much? Nix! 

'Long 'bout Thursday 
Count was six. 

Had an old razor 

Lyin' on a shelf; 
Put it in condition, 

'Gan to shave myself. 



Last winter's overcoat 

Looks mighty fine; 
Cleaned, pressed and mended 

(Thrift sta,mps nine). 

Stay at home and read now, 
'Stead of playin' pool; 

Watch where the pennies go, 
Live more by rule. 

One stamp, Tea Store, 

Grocer gave me two. 
Even dozen "Thrifties," 

Week not through. 

Bought me a business suit. 

Had to keep a front; 
Clothier's premium, four stam[)S^ 

"Pulled off the stunt." 

Twelve cents from nowhere, 

Thrift card filled; 
Bought me a war stamp; 

GoshI how I thrilled. 

Never thought I'd do it, 
Just a merry wheeze, eh? 

Saved a V in one week 
Just as e-a-s-y! 

S'teen little thrift stamps, 

Every week or two; 
Buy me a Liberty Bond 

'Fore the year's through. 



3,403 Employes in the U. S. Service 



Since the United States declared war on Germany, 3,403 employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company have entered the Army and Navy. 



**Kultur" and **Vultur'' are the same. Help put an end 
to both with War Savings Stamps 



A Bit of Laughing Gas 



Contrary 

''People should marry their opposites." 
''Most people are convinced that they did." 
— Louisville Courier- Journal. 

Divorced One — See here ! I want you to 
restrain your client from acknowledging my 
alimony checks on picture postcards from 
places where I can't afiford to go myself! 
— Judge. 



Getting Back at Hubby 

Mrs. Meekun — I wonder what they'll wear in 
heaven? 

Mr. Meekun — I suppose you'll want the most 
expensive things, the same as here. 

Mrs. Meekun — That needn't alarm you, 
dear. You won't be there to pay for them. 
— Wroe's Writings. 

23 



i Don't Cough Don't Sneeze Don't Spit | 




Courtesy Virginia Department of Health 



' Many diseases are spread in this manner, including pneumonia, measles, diphtheria, 
mumps, meningitis, infantile paralysis, " grip," and tuberculosis. 

Don't cough or sneeze unless you have a handkerchief to your mouth. 

Don't spit on the floors of railroad cars, street cars, stations, public buildings, or side- 
walks; in fact any place where it might be offensive or dangerous. 

If you must spit, find a cuspidor, or use your handkerchief. 



And the Railroad Men are Pledged to Help You 
Do It, Mr. Schwab! 

We must get the men and the guns and the airships over. More and more men 
must go over, and more guns and rifles and motor trucks — rails, clothing, and 
horses but the whole job depends upon you. I, for one, have every confidence 
that you will do the job and do it right. /"Vor/i Ihe address of July 4, of Mr. 
Charles M. Schwab, Director General of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. 



□ 

I 



24 



Wilson^s Call to Freemen Death Knell of 
Kaiserism and Teutonic Kultur 

i^From the President's Fourth of July Address) 



HHERE can he but one issue. The 
settlement must be final. There 
can be no compromise. No half- 
way decision would be tolerable. 
No halfway decision is conceivable. 
These are the ends for which the asso- 
ciated peoples of the world are fighting 
and which must be conceded them before 
there can be peace: 

The destruction of every arbitrary 
power anywhere that can separately, 
secretly, and of its single choice disturb 
the peace of the world or, if it cannot be 
presently destroyed, at the least its re- 
duction to virtual impotence. 

The settlement of every question, 
whether of territory, of sovereignty, of 
economic arrangement or of political 
relationship, upon the basis of the free 
acceptance of that settlement by the 
people immediately concerned, and not 
upon the basis of the material interest or 
advantage of any other nation or people 
which may desire a different settlement 
for the sake of its own exterior influence 
or mastery. 

The consent of all nations to be gov- 
erned in their conduct towards each other 
by the same principles of honor and of 
respect for the common law of civilized 
society that govern the individual citi- 
zens of all modern States in their relations 



with one another; to the end that all 
promises and covenants may be sacredly 
observed, no private plots or conspiracies 
hatched, no selfish injuries wrought with 
impunity, and a mutual trust estab- 
lished upon the handsome foundation of 
a mutual respect for right. 

The establishment of an organization 
of peace which shall make it certain that 
the combined power of free nations will 
check every invasion of right and serve 
to make peace and justice the more se- 
cure by affording a definite tribunal of 
opinion to which all must submit and by 
which every international readjustment 
that cannot be amicably agreed upon by 
the peoples directly concerned shall 
be sanctioned. 

These great objects can be put into a 
single sentence. What we seek is the 
reign of law, based upon the consent of 
the governed and sustained by the or- 
ganized opinion of mankind. 

These great ends cannot be achieved 
by debating and seeking to reconcile and 
accommodate what statesmen may wish, 
with their projects for balances of power 
and of national opportunity. They can 
be realized only by the determination of 
what the thinking peoples of the world 
desire, with their longing hope for justice 
and for social freedom and opportunity. 




25 



Our Worst Enemy 

UK-mt uuu uiiUHcuuuuui c ouuuuKiric 

"I am more powerful than the combined armies of the world. 

I have destroyed more men than all the wars of nations. 

I am more deadly than bullets, and I have wrecked more homes 
than the mightiest siege-guns. 

I steal, in the United Slates alone, over 300,000,000 dollars each 
year. 

I spare no one, and I find my victims among the rich and poor 
alike, the young and the old, the strong and the weak. 
Widows and orphans know me. 

I loom up to such proportions that I cast my shadow over every 
field of labor, from the turning of the grindstone to the 
moving of every railroad train. 

I massacre thousands upon thousands of wage-earners a year. 

I lurk in unseen places, and do the most of my work silently. You 
are warned against me, but you heed not. 

I am relentless. 

I am everywhere — in the house, on the street, in the factory, at 
railroad crossings, and on the sea. 

I bring sickness, degradation and death, and yet few seek to 
avoid me. 

I destroy, crush and maim; I give nothing, but take all. 
I am your worst enemy. 
I am CARELESSNESS." 



Famous Old Grafton Roundhouse Fast 
Passing to Make Way for 
Modern Structure 



|OWN in quaint and picturesque 
Grafton, W. Va., several veteran 
employes of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad gather at intervals 
to watch the fast-disappearing skeleton 
of one of the oldest haunts of railroad 
men in that section of the System. As 
the merciless hammer of the gang: breaks 
piece by piece the huge iron girders that 
formerly formed the frame-work of the 
old Grafton roundhouse, the veterans 
groan a bit, but realize that the big loco- 
motives now in use cannot be squeezed 
into the tiny stalls that once accommo- 
dated the engines of the division. 

As soon as the last vestige of the old 
roundhouse disappears there will begin 
to rise a modern structure that will add 



twelve stalls to* the ten already provided 
in the new roundhouse constructed more 
than ten years ago. It will mean an 
expenditure of about $325,000 for the 
addition, but when completed the plant 
will be one of the best equipped in 
the United States. H. A. Lane, chief 
engineer of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Lines, East, wants to make this a model 
engine house and has installed a one 
hundred-foot turn-table that will be able 
to hold "the largest engines. 

It was back in 1866 that the old Graf- 
ton roundhouse was started and it was 
finished the following year. There had 
once stood on the same site an ancient 
building belonging to the Northwestern 
Railways of Virginia, or what was known 




GRAFTON ROUNDHOUSE AS IT WAS FOR MANY YEARS 



27 



28 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



as the Parkersburg Branch. There have 
been beneath the old roof some of the 
locomotives which made history for the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and there 
have gathered there men who have been 
prominent figures in the handling of this 
section of the System after the stirring 
Civil War days. 

The Grafton roundhouse was erected 
under the supervision of 'George Lowry, 
who had as his principal assistants 
William Luethke and Henry Luethke, 
stone masons. Samuel Huston was the 
first master mechanic and he was more 
than proud of this 
quaint building, 
which in its day was 
one of the showplaces 
on the System. A 
list of the master me- 
chanics at the old 
roundhouse makes 
interesting reading, 
their names being 
linked with the de- 
velopment of the 
railroad around that 
section of West Vir- 
ginia. E. W. Lippin- 
cott succeeded Mr. Huston and then 
there came E. L. Weisgerber, S. B. Craw- 
ford, John Adair, Daniel C. Southers, 
G. C. Smith, P. Hayden, who is still a 
resident of Grafton, James Prendergast, 
Patrick Prendergast, O. J. Jelley, W. S. 
Galloway, W. I. Rowland, B. H. Haw- 
kins, H. Huston, M. H. Oakes, T. F. 
Perkinson and then J. A. Anderson, the 
present master mechanic. 

John (Jassell recalls the construction 
of the; old roundhouse and many of the 
incidents of the early days of its existence. 
For many years he was night foreman 
and now is retired and living at Blucville, 



just outside Grafton. William D. Hardy 
and Vernon Beall, retired engineers, still 
stroll around to watch the demolition of the 
famous building where, in the olden days, 
they were wont to call for their engines 
and place them in shelter for the night. 

The roundhouse has cradled some of 
the finest mechanicians in the country. 
Men who began life as railroaders in this 
bun-shaped structure have gone into 
other fields and made good. Some have 
gone to the very top of the railroad ladder 
and few failed to state when occasion 
permitted that they had started their 
careers at the Old 




FAREWELL, OLD ROUNDHOUSE ! 



Depot, ^'Grafton 
House" or therea- 
bouts. There is sad- 
ness manifested by 
many at the passing 
of this building, but 
all realize that in 
these days of progress 
and huge locomo- 
tives, the antiquated 
roundhouse must 
give way. Claude 
Brown is on the 
ground as the repre- 
sentative of the chief engineer and he 
has plans for a structure that will surprise 
the natives of Grafton, these plans having 
been prepared by the Company's archi- 
tect, M. A. Long. Instead of the old 
ninety-five-foot stalls, there will be one 
hundred and ten-foot stalls for the loco- 
motives and the immense turn-table will 
be a novelty that will be a magnet for the 
veterans who once got along handily 
with a much smaller table. 

The accompanying photographs will 
show the style of roundhouse in the 
olden days and the last vestige of the 
Grafton roundhouse of pioneer days. 



• 


KEEP CARS MOVING |j 

A car delayed one day represents the loss of earnings from handling one | | 
ton of coal one thousand miles | j 

KEEP CARS MOVING | 
" - - - ■■ .„ - „ - " . - „■■ •■ ..- ..- ..- ..".■•."..•♦] 


• 





The American Red Cross 

What It Is and What It Does 



(PART III) 



Who are the Refugees? 

When the German Army invaded 
France, hundreds of thousands of French 
people were driven from their homes and 
are now scattered throughout the Re- 
pubhc. These people are known as 
refugees. The number has increased, 
of course, for various reasons until now 
there are more than 1,200,000, em- 
bracing all classes and ages, except able- 
bodied men. There are approximately 
500,000 refugees in Paris alone. 

The housing of these people is one of 
the greatest problems of the French 
Government. The American Red Cross 
is cooperating with the French Govern- 
ment in this work. In Paris, where 
housing is the crux of the refugee problem, 
the American Red Cross has made an 
examination of all unfinished apartment 
buildings and has turned over nineteen 
of these, which will house 2,800 persons 
to housing organizations for completion. 
The Red Cross provides the furnishings 
and pays for them. 

What is the Red Cross doing for the people 
Hving in the ruined villages? 

One of the most pathetic things in 
France today is the reluctance of the 
French people to leave the ruined villages. 
Practically every able-bodied man is at 
war, or has fallen in battle; old men, 
women and children remain. With hus- 
bands, fathers, sons given to their coun- 
try, the one thing left that is dear to 
them is the old home. Now it is in ruins. 
Though their homes are in ruins and 
under poisonous gas, many of these old 
men and women and children rather 
than become refugees, cling to the place. 
They till their fields fairly up to the battle 



line, working mostly by night and staying 
by day in cellars. 

It is to help relieve such conditions 
that the American Red Cross has located 
its relief warehouses just behind the battle 
lines at strategic points; and is shipping 
food, clothes, blankets, beds, mattresses, 
stoves, kitchen utensils, garden tools and 
hundreds of other articles of prime im- 
portance to people who were contented 
and prosperous only four years ago. 
Today there are more than six hundred 
ruined towns in France. 



How are we helping to save the children of 
France? 

With the great reduction in births and 
the tremendous loss of life of men in the 
war, it is imperative that every child in 
France be saved, for in saving the 
children we save France. This problem 
is a grave one. There are today five 
thousand children under the medical care 
of the American Red Cross, and twenty 
thousand are aided by the Red Cross, 
directly or indirectly. The French 
Government has issued an edict that no 
child under seven years shall remain in 
the shelled area. Such young children 
cannot be taught to keep on their gas 
masks. 

Wherever barracks can be found, homes 
for the children are established; homes 
in which the Red Cross applies to these 
French children American standards of 
child-welfare. Medical centers, travel- 
ing dispensaries, and even traveling 
shower baths to care for the children in 
the devastated region have been provided. 
The village of Toul was the first center 
established by the Red Cross for the care 
and treatment of homeless children. 



29 



30 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EIMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Several other centers have since been 
estabUshed, and shelter is provided now 
by the Red Cross in sixty-three towns 
and cities outside of Paris. 

How is this work looked upon by the French 
people? 

This question can best be answered by 
the following incident told by Mr. Henry 
J. Allen, editor of the Wichita (Kansas) 
Beacon, which illustrates most forcibly 
the implicit faith of the French people 
in the American Red Cross. Mr. Allen 
saj^s: ''At Toul I met a wonderful little 
woman, Madame Tirrell, of gentle birth 
and formerly used to all the comforts and 
luxuries of life. Madame Tirrell is a 
woman of wonderful combination of 
quiet strength and determination. Her 
husband is in the trenches and she is 
working alone on her little farm, twelve 
miles behind the firing line. If she tries 
to work in her fields in the daytime the 
Germans drop a shell thereabouts and 
she has to run to the shelter of her under- 
ground dug-out, where she lives day after 
day, and then at night she goes out under 
the slars alone, and with her gas mask 
around her neck she has plowed and 
sowed and reaped thirty acres of wheat. 
And then last August she took ten days' 
vacation to give birth to her baby. At 
the end of that time she brought the baby 
to Toul, to turn it over to your American 
Red Cross. I endeavored to say what a 
heroine I considered her to be, and she 
passed it off as a matter of course. She 
says she has no hatred in her heart for 
the Cermans and for what they have 
done to her, })ut sh(; shed tears of woman- 
ly vexation and anger only because the 
C(^rmans wouldn't let her work in the 
daytime in her fi(;lds when she could 
accorni)lish so much more than by 
working at night in the darkness. And 
when she l(;ft, she said, '(iood-bye, Mr. 
All(;n, 1 know that your Anieiic^an Red 
Ooss is going to take care of my baby, 
but I must get back to my little farm, 
for France needs my grain more than my 
l)aby needs me.' " 

How is the dependent population of France 
constantly augmented ? 

By the Repatries. 



Who are the Repatries? 

They are the French and Belgian 
people who were caught behind the Ger- 
man line in the great drive of 1914, and 
have since been returned to France. 
These people have been living in cap- 
tivity in the parts of France and Belgium 
occupied by the German Army and have 
been working possibly on their own lands, 
at their own looms, in their own bakeries, 
for Germany. In 1915 Germany began 
a systematic repatriation of them through 
Switzerland. Up to January 1, 1918, 
more than three hundred thousand re- 
patries had passed into France through 
Evian, a town near the Swiss frontier, 
and the stream continues unbroken, at 
the rate of more than a thousand a day. 
There are yet hundreds of thousands to 
come. Those whom Germany sends 
back are industrial discards of a nation 
efficiently stripping itself of human 
encumbrances — children under ten, women 
burdened with the care of two or more 
children, men past fifty. 



What is the Red Cross doing for these Re- 
patries? 

Each arriving train, one in the morning 
and one in the evening, is met by auto- 
mobiles and ambulances with Red Cross 
chauffeurs to help the aged and infirm. 
The children are examined and serious 
cases treated immediately at Evian. 
Children in need of convalescent care 
are sent to a Red Cross hospital near 
Lyons; tuberculous repatries are re- 
ferred to a Red Cross hospital in Lyons; 
and the thousands of homeless old men, 
women and children are sent to strange 
parts of France because their own villages 
are devastated or in enemy territory, to 
be m(^t by American Red Cross delegates, 
who aid in re-estal)lishing livabk^ homes 
with some fu(*1, furniture, clothing and 
food. While many of these people have 
b(;en imited with th(»ir families and have 
found n(^w homes in their native lands, 
yet because of this constant pou ring-in 
j)roc(\ss, from thirty to forty thousand are 
i('ni[)()rarily (le{)endent upon Ameri- 
can lied ('ross. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



31 



What assistance is the American Red Cross 
giving the French authorities toward 
preserving health? 

The American Red Cross is filling a 
certain definite role in a program, begun 
in the summer of 1917, under the pat- 
ronage and general direction of the 
Rockefeller Foundation, to combat tuber- 
culosis. This work is carried on, not 
only in military hospitals, but among 
the civil population as well. Judging 
from the results accomplished thus far, 
those in authority there believe that this 
program will be carried farther in France 
in four years than we carried it in the 
United States in twenty-five years. 

When the war opened there were 
24,000 physicians and surgeons in the 
French Republic; 18,000 of them went 
to war and forty per cent, of these 18,000 
have fallen in the last three and a half 
years. There are communities in France 
of 25,000 population without a compe- 
tent doctor. To meet this emergency, 
twenty-eight well-equipped Red Cross 
dispensaries, three of them in Paris, have 
been established, and the attempt is 
being made to reach the civil population 
that is suffering from the ravages of war, 
by detailing doctors and nurses for ser- 
vice at these dispensaries. In addition 
to these there are now throughout the 
Republic probably three hundred clinics 
and minor dispensaries operated by the 
Red Cross, in many cases occupying a 
single room of a French hospital or other 
charitable institution. The American 
Red Cross is now conducting, wholly 
at its own expense, seven hospitals for 
children and tuberculous patients. 



ITALY 

What is our problem in Italy? 

The Refugees. 

What created an emergency for Red Cross 
Work in Italy? 

The great German and Austrian drive 
which wrecked the Italian battle front 
and caused the retreat from Udine late 
in October, 1917, when 500,000 refugees 
were made in a single day. 



What do we mean by Italian Refugees? 

People compelled by the invading army 
to desert their homes in great haste in 
order to save their lives. The trans- 
portation of these people from the danger 
zone was a monstrous task and, con- 
sidering the large numbers and the need 
of quick action, the Italian Government 
did a remarkable piece of work. It was 
necessary, of course, to crowd them into 
cars. In some cases men, women and 
children had to stand for three days 
without food or rest; children were born 
on trains ; and many people fell and died 
of exposure. On reaching their desti- 
nation it was impossible to care properly 
for such a large number of people so that 
thousands had to sleep in churches and 
monasteries, often with nothing between 
their bodies and the stone floors. 

How did the American Red Cross meet this 
emergency? 

Up to the time of this disaster, the 
American Red Cross was operating only 
through an advisory commission and had 
undertaken little of special importance. 
A telegram from the Amercian Ambassa- 
dor to Italy for food and clothes reached 
the American Red Cross in Paris in the 
middle of one forenoon; by the evening 
of the next day they had bought in the 
Paris markets twenty-four carloads of 
supplies and had started these caYs 
toward Italy. Within one week after the 
disastrous retreat the American Red 
Cross was in the field with physicians, 
nurses and ambulances, ministering to 
the refugees. Twenty-three ambulances 
were dispatched from France early in 
November for service with the Italian 
Army, and it is planned to increase the 
number to two hundred. 

What practical aid has the American Red 
Cross given these refugees? - 

Our Red Cross Committee has sent 
beds, mattresses, blankets, sheets, cloth- 
ing and has opened soup kitchens, hos- 
pitals and warehouses at essential points. 
It has furnished these refugees with tools 
and implements and is endeavoring to 
place them in positions where they can 
ply their own trades. These people. 



32 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



however, will have to be cared for, to a 
large degree, until the invaders are driven 
back, when the next great relief work, 
that of reconstmction, will begin. 

ENGLAND 

What is the character of our work in Eng- 
land? 

Our Red Cross Commission in England 
is working in cooperation with the 
British Red Cross and the Y. M. C. A., 
both American and British, in furnishing 
relief and comfort in France to sick and 
wounded in hospitals, in casualty clearing 
stations and on lines of communication; 
in maintaining Red Cross auxiliary hos- 
pitals and convalescent homes in Eng- 
land; and in supplying instruction in 
Great Britain for Orthopedic and Facial 
Treatment and for general restorative 
work for disabled soldiers. The Ameri- 
can Red Cross is also maintaining a hos- 
pital at a port in England for sick Ameri- 
can soldiers and sailors, and one at South 
Devon which will be available for our 
boys in emergencies. 

In appreciation of what the American 
Red Cross is doing for England, the fol- 
lowing expression has been received from 
the British Government: 

''I should like personally to express 
our profound appreciation of the action 
of the American Red Cross in contri- 
buting $1,000,000 to the funds of the 
British Red Cross. It is a gift charac- 
teristic of the generous and friendly heart 
of the American people. It will bring 
relief to thousands of suffering men and 
women, and will be a further means of 
strengthening the real understanding 
between the United States and Great 
Britain, which the former's whole-hearted 
entry in the war for liberty has created. 
I know that I am expressing the thought 
dominant in the minds of my fellow- 
countrymer^ when I say that they will 
always remember this gift with gratitude." 
(Signed) D. Lloyd (\va)rc,k. 

BELGIUM 

Do we have a special Red Cross Commission 
for Belgium? 

Yes. Owing 1o difliciillics of coiii- 
municatiori and transportation in France, 



a Commission of the American Red Cross 
has been formed to direct all Red Cross 
activities in Belgium, with headquarters 
at Havre, France, now the seat of the 
Belgian Government. 

What is our special work for Belgium? 

Particular attention has been given 
to Belgian children and orphans who 
have been the great sufferers during the 
three and a half years of war. In this 
work the American Red Cross is aiding 
the Queen of Belgium, who has the care 
of the orphans undc r her personal super- 
vision. Homes have been established 
where the Red Cross is trying to bring 
back to life and vigor these children in 
whom lies the hope of Belgium. The 
American Red Cross is now aiding 6,000 
Belgian children of whom it has 1,000 in 
complete charge. 

What will be the great work as the battle 
line retires? 

Reconstruction. When a village is 
recovered the work of rehabilitation is 
begun by the burgomaster and his assist- 
ants, the Red Cross furnishing them 
with tools, furniture, seeds, farm animals 
and supplies needed to help the refugees 
get on their feet. Warehouses have 
already been erected along canals and 
highways to serve as centers of relief 
distribution. 

ROUMANIA 
What is the problem in Roumania? 

('rushed on all sides by the enemy, the 
little kingdom of Roumania presents 
what is probably the saddest example 
of the tragedy that follows in the wake 
of warfare. Three million of her eight 
million once prosperous inhabitants are 
dead — victims of battle and disease. 
The remaining five million, driven back 
l)y the enemy hordes from the fertile 
portions of the empire, were, previous 
to the peace pact of March 6, crowded 
togcither m what was h^ft of free Rou- 
mania, a strip of stcM'ile land lying along 
the Russian l)()r(ler and representing less 
than a thiid of the nation's original 
territory. 

(V'o he (•oiuliidcd) 



A Lesson from Arctic Regions for 
Railroad Men 




jVi ylN the regions near the North 
%|1 Pole there is but one day and 

one night the year round — six 
' months of Hght and six months 
of night. 

Peary, the world-famous Arctic ex- 
plorer, has said that travelers to the land 
of the Esquimaux do not fear the extreme 
cold, or other 
hardships 
attendant on 
such a peril- 
ous journey, 
so much as 
they do the 
six months of 
darkness. He 
said a nervous 
man would 
probably go 
insane in the 
long night. 

What, then, 
must be the 
mental agony 
of the rational 
man who is 
stricken blind 
and who must 
live, not only 
through six 
months of 
darkness, but 
through an 
eternal night? 
When one 
seriously re- 
flects upon such a profoundly pathetic 
fate one shudders and one's blood becomes 
chilled. 

The blackest of shadows has been cast 
upon his soul and he need never hope for 
even a faint ray of light to relieve the 
awful gloom. He must grope through 
the dark and, seemingly, unending years 





CAREFUL WORKER— GOOD HOME 
CARELESS WORKER— NO HOME 



until his epitaph is written. An im- 
penetrable curtain has been drawn before 
his eyes shutting out from view for all 
time all that he holds near and dear. 
His mother, whose soul was thrilled with 
ebullitions of joy at seeing those eyes 
open to the light of day, must now go daily 
through the soul-tearing ordeal of seeing 

them closed 
forever. Per- 
haps her grief 
could not be 
more poig- 
nant had she 
seen them 
cl o s e d in 
death. 

Is it any 
wonder why 
Peary pre- 
sumes a nerv- 
o u s man 
would go in- 
sane even in 
six months of 
darkness? 

Now, you 
B al t im ore 
and Ohio em- 
ploy es to 
whom this ap- 
plies, the plain 
question is: 

"Will you 
use your gog- 
gles, or will 
you run the 
risk of losing your sight and, perhaps, end as 
a raving maniac in some lunatic asylum? " 

Seriously reflect on such a frightful 
fate. The choice is yours! The matter 
is fairly and squarely up to you ! 

You will do well each morning when 
you punch your time card to bear in 
mind the words of Peary. 




Pins is Pins 



By H. S. S. 



WHAT an insignificant thing is a little pin, yet many of us 
would not dare to pass one without stooping to pick it up. 
We say: "It is an amulet — it will bring me good luck." The 
charm power of a restored pin may be questioned, but its ability 
to produce economy cannot be. 

But the whole nation is conserving nowadays. Your help is 
needed. You may say that a pin does not amount to much, but 
in its production there is a certain amount of material and energy 
wasted that might be employed in the production of some essential 
that could be used in the drive toward Berlin. 

In the making of pins, such a small article, a quantity of 
heat is necessary in the different processes' and the conservation 
of fuel is here added to the saving of human energy if you and I 
give our little mite towards picking up every pin we see lying idle. 

A good many pins are thrown away with waste paper. 
These could very easily be saved; and in doing so you are helping 
in two ways, — you are saving the pin and then we get more for 
the waste paper. 

The great majority of them are filed with correspondence, where 
they stop working, and have to be replaced. 

Let's form the habit of "pulling a pin out" just the same as we 
do of "pushing a pin in," and let's make these pins work instead of 
loafing in the file room. 

Won't you help cut the pin bill ? 



Baseball Activities Among Employes 



Special Notice 



f The Thompson Baseball Cup will become the permanent property of the 

j baseball team winning the T9I8 System Championship of the Baltimore and 

I Ohio System. 

i 

I On account of change in the organization of the Eastern Lines, the General 

I Manager's Baseball Cup will be donated this year by S. Ennes instead of by 

I R. N. Begien. 



Mt. Clare Shops 

The MoLuit Clare Welfare, Pleasure and 
Athletic Association basketball team's season, 
just closed, was the second and most suc- 
cessful for the team. Although not winning 
as many games as during the first season, the 
players made a more creditable showing, con- 
sidering the strong teams that opposed them. 
Playing in the Baltimore Basketball League, 
they won eight games and lost seven, having the 
edge on every team excepting the Central Y. M. 
C. A., which won two games of a series of three, 
the final and deciding game being played on a 
neutral floor, at which the Mount Clare Band 
was in attendance. The games were closely 
contested in all cases and furnished some real 
sport. E. E. Emmerich was team manager and 
H. Winters, athletic manager. 

The Mount Clare Welfare, Pleasure and 
Athletic Association has arranged an excursion 
to Tolchester Beach for Saturday, August 10. 
The association anticipates a very large crowd. 
The Mount Clare Band will l^e in attendance 
and there will be a number of outdoor athletic 
sports, including a baso})all gnme. 



The names, occupations and positions of the 
men on the Mount Clare Welfare baseball team 
are as follows: 

Position 

Name Occupation On Team 

W. T. Mahaney. . .Clerk Catcher. 

P. S. Andrews. . . .Piecework 

Inspector. . .Pitcher. 
J. Appel Machinist 

Helper 1st Base. 

B. Caulder Car Builder. . .Short Stop. 

R. Maul Machinist Center Field. 

J. Boland Machinist 

Helper Pitcher. 

T. Dee Clerk 2nd Base. 

T. Beck Machinist 2nd Base. 

C. Bloomfield Machinist Left Field. 

H. Eyerly Apprentice. . . .Left Field. 

J. Sank Machinist 

Helper., . . . .3rd Base. 
J. Gribbin Machinist 

Helper Short Stop. 

C. A. Eisennacher. Apprentice. . . .Right Field. 

A. Evans .Shop Hand. . . .Pitcher. 

W. Poska Carpenter Right Field. 

H. Wartman Material IVlan . Umpire. 



3G 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLo'yES MAGAZINE 




MT. CLAKE BASKETBALL TEAM 



Pennsylvania District 

Below are the names of players comprising 
the Glenwood, Pa., and New Castle Jimction, 
Pa., baseball teams, the same being eligible to 
take part in the inter-division games which 
started Saturday, June 22: 

Glenwood, Pa., Team 

Name Occupation In Service 

E. G. Gisbcrt. . . Pipe Fitter 8 years. 

W. W. White.. . .Pipe Fitter 9 years. 

William Seanay . Brakeman 7 years. 

Guy Shrope Brakeman 3 years. 

J. F. Parker. . . .Pipe Fitter 6 years. 

'J'homas Kyh;. . .Machine Operator. .8 months. 
'J'homas Hudson. Boilermaker . . ^ . . . .5 years. 

J. J. Boltz Handyman 9 years. 

Earl Glass Patrolman 7 months. 

A. J. O'Malley. Machinist 5 years. 

D. J. Fricl Oil(!r 3 years. 

Reynolds. . . .(Jlerk >.4 years. 

W. (2iiirririg Chi(!f Clerk to 

»Storck(H!i)(!r ."> moni lis. 

A. Nehilla Machine Cjpcrafor .2 years. 

H. J. Meehan. . Machine 

Api)r('nt ice 2 years. 

E. (1. Gisbcrt, is c'lptiiiu Glcriuofxl Ic.'iiii. 



Frank Rush, non-playing manager, Glenwood 
team. 

New Castle Junction, Pa., Team 

Name Occupation In Service 

Harry Horner Engineer 8 years. 

L. M. Pliler Boilermaker 4 years. 

M. E. Battley Brakeman 2 years. 

William Shields.. .Fireman 3 years. 

Joseph Chill Foreman 8 years. 

J. Barttley Machinist 3 months. 

D. McCormick.. . Machinist 3 years. 

S. Daniels Car Repairman.. .5 years. 

Charles Irwin Machinist 6 years. 

M. N. Wolfgang.. Brakeman 2 years. 

W. C. Guthrie Storekeeper 13 years. 

G. H. Wynuui Brakeman 5 years. 

R. Roberts Fireman 2 years. 

William Chill Clerk 3 years. 

Harry Horner is captain New Castle Junction 
I earn. 

A. C. Harris, non-i)laying manager, New 
Castle Junction team. 

"Andy" liennett, star catcher for Pit tsburgh, 
liMK been home on a brief furlough and is looking 
the pict,iU(! of health. "Andy" tells us that he 
is in love with cjiuip life. The baseball team 
is surely missing "Andy" this year, but Tncle 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Sam has a great asset. He is in the Depot 
Brigade at Camp Lee and is a sergeant. The 
best wishes go to "Andy." Another star player 
has been added to Uncle Sam's fighting forces 
in Paul Schandoll. He recently was home on 
a furlough, but now is in France. 

Glenwood added another victory to its string 
on July 6 when the nine from that town humbled 
the ball tossers from New Castle. The score 
was 8 to 2, in a seven inning contest. Voltz 
allowed the New Castle team only four hits and 
struck out nine of the players who faced him. 
Shrope, Reynolds and Gisbert did the most 
slugging for the winners. Score: 



Glenwood ab r bh po a e 

Gisbert, 3d 4 2 1 1 1 

Seaney, 1st 2 4 

White, If.. 3 2 2 1 

Friel, c 2 9 1 

Meehan, 2d 2 11110 

Reynolds, ss 2 2 2 3 1 

O'Malley, rf 2 2 

Shrope, cf 3 1 2 1 

Voltz, p 3 1 

Matthews, 1st 2 3 



Totals 25 8 9 21 6 2 

New Castle ab r bh po a e 

McCormick, 2d 4 

Pliler, ss 4 1 1 3 1 

Nye, c 3 3 

Homer, 1st 2 1 2 9 

Wyman, cf 2 

Foley, p 3 1 3 

Wolfgang, If 2 3 1 

Daniels, 3d 2 1 2 3 2 

Guthrie, rf 3 



Totals 25 2 418 9 4 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total 

New Castle 2 00000 2 

Glenwood 1 3 3 1 x 8 



Two-base hits — Shrope, Reynolds. Three- 
base hits — Gisbert, Daniels. Sacrifice hits — 
Meehan, Reynolds, Wolfgang. Struck out— by 
Voltz, 9; by Foley, 3. Base on balls— off Voltz 
2; off Foley, 1. Earned runs — Glenwood, 5; 
New Castle, 0. Left on bases — Glenwood, 3; 
New Castle, 4. First base on errors — Glen- 
wood, 3; New Castle, 2. Umpires — Glasman 
and Coleman. 

Glenwood defeated New Castle in a slugging 
match at the New Castle groimds by the score 
of 11 to 8. The Glenwood nine collected 15 
hits off Bartley, who was in danger nearly all 
the way. Meehan, of the Glenwood team, 
cracked out two two-base hits and scored twice. 



37 

A neat double play, engineered by Meehan and 
Seaney, cut off runners who were threatening 
to score and upset the lead the Glenwood team 
had. Score: 

Glenwood ab r bh po a e 

Gisbert, 3d 5 3 2 ^4 

Seaney, 1st 5 2 3 8 

White, If 4 1 3 1 

Friel, c 4 1 1 10 2 

Meehan, 2d 4 2 3 3 1 

Reynolds, ss 3 2 2 3 1 

Shrope, cf 4 2 1 1 

O'Malley, rf . .' 5 1 1 

Voltz, p 5 

Hudson, p 



Totals 39 11 15 25 8 5 

Two-base hits— Friel, Meehan, 2, Gisbert. 
Double plays — Meehan to Seaney. Number of 
innings pitched by Voltz, 8^; by Hudson, |. 
Numberof hitsmade — off Voltz, 4; off Hudson, 3. 
Struck out — Voltz, 9. Bases on balls — Voltz 2, 
Hudson, 2. Wild pitches, Voltz, 2. Hit by 
pitched ball — Voltz. Passed balls — Friel 2. 
Earned runs — 7. Left on bases, 6. First base 
on errors, 4. 

New Castle ab r bh po a e 

Sisler, 3d 3 2 2 

Pliler, ss 5 1 2 1 4 2 

Daniels, 2d 3 1 1 4 2 

Homer, 1st 3 1 13 

Battley, c 4 3 5 

Wyman, cf 2 

Irwin, f 4 1 1 3 

Wolfgang, rf 3 1 1 1 

Bartley, p 4 1 5 1 

Shields, cf 2 1 



Totals 33 8 7 27 13 5 

Number of hits made — off Bartley, 15. 
Struck out — Bartley, 4. Bases on balls, 
Bartley, 1. Hit by pitched ball, 1. Eamed 
runs, 2. Left on bases, 7. First base on 
errors, 3. 



Cleveland Division 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad employes 
of Cleveland have placed a stronger baseball 
team in the field than in previous years and are 
open to play any team on the System. The 
team has won two games and lost one. For 
games communicate with R. Schuler, 1430 W. 
54th Street, Cleveland. 

Following is the lineup: Curley, 2b.; Hobson, 
I. f.; O'Brein, s. s.; Skidley, lb.; Schuler, p.; 
Wallace, c. f.; Sheakley, r. f.; Smith, 3b.; Skid- 
ley, c; Pressler, Williams, Kundtz and Whit- 
acre, utilitj^ players. 



3S 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Cleveland walloped Willard to the time of 
8 to 1 in a fast game at the Cleveland field. 
Sheakley, who pitched for the Cleveland team, 
was in fine shape and allowed only six scattered 
hits. No one of the Willard nine got more than 
a single hit. Miller was the only Willardite 
who was able to get more than one base on a 
hit. He made the only run. O'Brien and 
O'Neill, for the victors, had their batting eye 
goggleless and swatted the ball hard and con- 
sistently. Score: 

Willard ab 'r bh po a e 

Arters, rf 3 1 3 

Bell, 3b 4 

Huston, p.... 4 2 

Wayland, c 3 1 5 4 

Savage, ss.. 3 1 1 

Archer, lb 4 1 10 1 

McDonald, cf 2 1 3 1 

Miller, If 3 1 1 3 

Keene, 2b.. 3 1 3 

Totals 29 1 6 24 11 2 

Two-base hits — Miller. Three-base hits — 0. 
Home runs — 0. Sacrifice hits — 0. Struck out 
—Huston, 4. Bases on balls^ — off Huston, 4. 
Hit by pitched ball — Savage. Left on bases, 4. 

Cleveland ab r bh po a e 

Y. Marick, 2b 4 1 3 4 2 

Frosco, 3b 4 2 2 2 3 

O'Brien, ss 4 2 3 2 

O'Neill, c 4 1 1 9 

Shcpard, If 4 1 2 2 

Schuler, rf., p 3 2 

Barnarski, cf 1 

Walus, cf 3 

Skidley, lb 3 9 

Sheakley, p 2 1 1 2 

Hor^on, rf 2 1 

Totals 34 8 12 27 11 

Two-base hits — O'Brien. Thre(!-base hits — 
O'Neill. Sa(;rific(; hits- Skidley. Double i)]ays 
— .Mari(;k, unassisted; 0'J:Jrien 1o Marick to 
Skidley. Number innings pitched- Sheakley, 
4; Schuler, 5. Numlx-r liits made off Sheak- 
ley, 1 ; ofT Schiihir, 5. St ruck out by Sh(!;ikley, 
5; by Schuler, 2. liases on balls off Sheakhiy, 
2; olT Schiller, 4. Hit by pitch(!d ball— Skidley. 
Eanied runs, 0. Left on bases — 7. First base 
on (;rrorH — 2. 

Indiana Division 

The championship team at S(!ynioiij, Indiana 
consists of th(! following: 

I>KN{iTir 

Name Pohition or Kkiivick 

(I. McC'oskor, hh. . . .Timekeeper. ...'.) ye;us. 

1j. Ackerman, 2b, p. Chirk I yenr. 

J. Sm'/c, 31) I''iretn;ui lOnionlhs. 

II. Liie;is, lb Su il chni.'in . , . . 2 yeai'f^. 



J. Aulman, rf Fireman 11 months. 

R. C. Cooper, cf. . . .Fireman 9 months. 

H. Mendell, If Fireman 6 years. 

R.Clark, If Brakeman 10 months. 

V. G. Moritz, c. . . . .Brakeman 1^ years. 

J. Dittmer, p Fireman 11 months. 

J. W. Allen, sub Fireman 2 years. 

H. Cowles, sub Brakeman 2 years. 

P.Jackson, sub Brakeman 9 months. 

Blevins, sub Brakeman 3 months. 

C. Glasson, sub Clerk 6 months. 

The championshi}) team at Flora, Indiana, 
is made up as follows: 

Length 

Name Position cf Service 

H. F. Rice, lb. . . .Check Clerk 8 years. 

C. F. Rice, 2b. . . .Brakeman 10 years. 

D. Kramer, ss. . . .Brakeman 2 years. 

H. M. Hogan, 3b.. Car Distributer.. 7 years. ' 

R. Herrin, If Boiler Maker. ... 2 years. 

L. E. Kellums, cf .M. P. Dist. Clerk. 3 years. 

J. Smelzer, rf Machinist 6 years. 

D. Lentz,''p Helper 2 years. 

J. Cherry, p Operator 10 years. 

F. Corey, c B. M. Helper. ... 4 years. 

T. F. Burns, sub. .Brakeman 2 years. 

L. Tullett, sub . . . .Machine Helper. . 4 years. 
R. Jefferis, sub.. . .C T. Timekeeper. 7 years. 

L. Wells, sub Baggageman 1 year. 

W. S. Allen, umpire. M.W. Timekeeper. 4 years. 



Illinois Division 

The first ball game of the season on the 
Illinois Division was played at Flora on June 8, 
resulting in a victory for Flora by a score of 
10 to 5. Both teams had practically their same 
lineup as last year and the first game was very 
interesting and much enthusiasm was displayed. 
A large crowd was in attendance. The most 
remarkable feature of the game was the three- 
bagger by Nurge. It was never thought that 
he could come back, but the indications are that 
his sticking ability this year will equal that of 
191G. 

The second game, which was played at Floi a, 
June IG, did not result so well for Flora, Wash- 
ington Shoi)s defeating them by a score of 5 to 
0. This was due to errors. As the matter now 
stands, Washington and Flora arc the only 
Baltimore and Ohio teams on the division and 
th(!y are now tied. Both teams are very anx- 
ious to grab the championship for the Illinois 
Division and it is likely that the future games 
will be very exciting. 

New^ark Division 

The New.'irk Division b:iseb;ili le:iin delenled 
;i le;ini composed of employes from ZMnes\ ilIe 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



39 



on May 25 by a score of 13 to 3. Features of 
the game were the pitching of Thomas and the 
fiekling and batting of the division team. On 
June 15 the Newark Division team defeated 
a team from Benwood by a score of 7 to 5. 
Pitcher L. Thomas for the Newark Division 
did excellent work on this occasion. Superin- 



tendent of shops Cooper has been selected to 
manage the Newark Division team for the 
season and has selected a team which will no 
doul)t be a credit to the division. All em- 
ployes of the division are urged to cooperate 
with the management of the baseball team to 
make the coming season a successful one. 



School for Training Women as Railroad 
Ticket Sellers 



The United States Railroad Administration 
issues the following: 

Because of the need for skilled ticket sellers 
and the difficulty of obtaining enough trained 
men the Railroad Administration has opened 
schools in several sections of the country for 
training women to fill these positions. 

The present force of trained men ticket sellers 
will be retained whenever possible because of 
the expert character of their work, but it has 
been foimd necessary to supplement their activi- 
ties with women. This is due partially to the 



increase of traffic and partially to the loss of 
men to the Army and Navy. 

When thoroughly trained, women ticket 
sellers will be paid the same salaries as men 
doing the same work. Already enough applica- 
tions have been made to fill the schools for the 
present. 

After preliminary training of from one to 
two months, the women who show aptitude will 
be given work of actual selling the simpler 
form of tickets and gradually will be worked 
into the sale of more complicated forms. 



JJirJ* no lo ti n n [« 1 [) n o m t o on i n n o n n n n j n nn no n ti ti ii 

ff^^' ti uui ci [ c n n t n [ n I ii ci c [ i { c t c c ti [ Jf"\ 



1 g 

i i 



DEFINITION OF SUCCESS 



i i 

i i 



HE HAS achieved success who has lived well, laughed 
often and loved much, who has gained the respect 
I of intelligent men and the love of little children and 

j dumb animals; who has filled his niche and accomplished his 
j task — who has left the world better than when he found it, 
I whether by an improved poppy, a perfect poem or a rescued | f 
I soul; who never lacked appreciation of earth's beauty or failed 1 1 
1 to express it; who has always looked for the best from others 1 1 
i and given the best he had; whose life was an inspiration; I 
I whose memory a benediction — Stanley 



I i 



ii 



\>cf t) n inn ) t ti tj ii □ n □ ) □ n n o n a i n □ n n au n i on V'^' 
^c^i ) ti ) 1 11 1 1 1 " " t 1 1 m 1 1 ti 1) d n 1 [] 1 11 J , , jf»«^ 



40 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Baltimore and Ohio Employes 
- o c Magazine 

i William F. Braden, Editor 

1 Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist 

1 George B. Luckey, Staff Photographer 



What Have You Given Up? 



I AVE you given up your job and 
let your business future take 
care of itself? 

Have you said good-bye to 
your family and friends and all you hold 
dear? 

Have you begun an entirely new career 
that may end, if you live, with health 
impaired, an arm off, a leg gone, an eye 
out? 

Have you given up your business fu- 
ture and said good-bye and taken a 
chance on coming back ahve and well, 
and done it all with a cheerful heart 
and with a grim determination to do 
all you possibly can for your country? 

And do you only at times — in the 
evenings, perhaps, when the light in the 
sky slowly fades away — feel so home- 
sick and so lonesome that you are fearful 
you will not have the courage to do your 
part after all? 

You hav(^ not done these things? Ah, 
I se(^, you are not ono of our Army or 
Navy boys; you are a stay-at-home 
person . 

Well, there have to be twenty or more 
stay-at-hom(i persons for ('veryone who 
goes, and so certainly no disgrac(y attaches 
to being on(? if you fully appreciates what 
those boys who do go have io giv(s up 
and if you suf)y)ort them to Ihe limit of 
your al)ility. 

Pledgfs yourself to save to the utmost 
of your ability and to }my War Savings 



Stamps that there may be more money, 
labor, and materials to back up those 
who fight and die for you. 



Make Your Letters Say, 
**We'll Win'* 



GlET the victory punch into your 
business letters. 

■^^S Pessimism is more infectious 
than a cold. One doubter can 
give the chills to a room full of people. 
The germ of this disease often creeps 
into our correspondence and does more 
harm than the spoken word. 

So the Department of Commerce 
suggests that the win-the-war spirit 
be got into business letters. Originally 
the idea was proposed to apply to mail 
sent to foreign countries. Here the 
color of our thoughts is searched for 
eagerly between the lines of what we 
write. The business man abroad — 
whether a neutral or an ally — is quick 
to see any weakness. The flag ought 
to be kept flying in all letters that leave 
the country. 

The same is true of business letters 
to home correspondents. There is such 
a thing as negative as well as positive 
patriotism. To refrain from doubts is 
not enough. Our correspondence should 
carry a vital confidence and purpose to 
see the war through to victory. We are 
going to win. Let your letters show 
you know it. 



New Meat Program 

|HE demand for beef for our Army, 
the armies of the Allies and their 
civil populations for this summer 
are bej^ond our present surplus. 
On the other hand, we have enough 
increased supply of pork this summer to 
pennit economical expansion in its use. 
It. will therefore be a direct service to 
our Armies and the Allies if our people 
will in some (Jogrec substitute fresh 
pork, bacon, ham, and sausage for beef 
products. 



The Little Flag On Our House 



By William Curtis Demorest 



Read at the forty-first annual dinner of the Class of 1881, Arts 
and Mines, held at the Columbia University Club on April 4. 



The little flag on our house 

Is floating all the day 

Beside the great big Stars and Stripes. 

You can almost hear it say 

To all the folks in our street, 

As the breezes make it dance : 

" Look up and see my one blue star — 

We've got a boy in France!" 



The little flag on our house, 
It floats sometimes at night. 
And you can see it 'way up there 
When the street lamp shines just right. 
And sometimes, 'long towards morning, 
When the cop comes by, perchance. 
It signals with its one blue star: 
"We've got a boy in France!" 



The little flag on our house 

Will wave, and wave, and wave 

Until our boy comes home again. 

Or finds in France his grave. 

Nay — tho' its blue star turn to gold. 

Because of War's grim chance. 

It still shall wave to say : " Thank God ! 

We've got a boy in France!" 

— From Leslie's Weekly. 



□ 



The Service Flag 

By C. F. LaFlare 
Freight Conductor, Chicago Division 



Halt! Lift thine eyes; salute that star. 
It tells that a man has gone to war. 
It tells of a mother's love and tears; 
It tells of a father's hope and fears. 



It tells of a sister's broken heart; 
Tells that a brother is taking a part. 
It tells of a sweetheart's sacrifice. 
It tells of a Hell and a Paradise. 



It tells that a MAN will place a lily 
In the Kaiser's hand some day soon. 
Halt! Lift thine eyes; salute that star. 




42 



From the Boys "Over There" 



The two following letters were received by 
J. S. Murray, assistant to the president, from 
former clerks in the President's office: 

Dear Mr. Murray: 

I have written to you about three times 
since my arrival in France, as I knew that you 
would be somewhat interested, but due to the 
imcertainties of the mail, I suppose they have 
not reached you. However, I am again making 
an attempt in the hopes that this letter will go 
through all right. 

First of all, I want to tell you how delighted 
I am that our mutual friend "Sam" has been 
located in the same department and in the same 
city that I am. I was aware of the fact that 
he was on his way across, for I had seen his 
record in the office of the Director General of 
Transportation, which had preceded him, so 
I was on the lookout for him. I ran into him 
a week or so ago, about eight o'clock in the 
morning, when he was "washing up" at the 
fountain. He was so surprised to see me that 
"he dropped his soap and towels and almost 
dropi^ed himself. kSince that time we have 
been together every evening, and, of course, 
have had much of interest lo talk oyer. He 
is now all right and again looking fine. It gives 
me much i)leasure to tell you that he is highly 
thought of in the office of the D. G. T. and'tias 
been made chief clerk to the Deputy D. G. T., 
Colonel W. J. Wilgus, formerly of the New York 
Central. He has landed a very good berth, is 
now a sergeant and before long I feel sure that 
he will be really something worth while in the 
way of status. I feel that you will be glad to 
know of this, as well as all his other friends 
ai ound the office. 

1 suppose now it will \)v pi oper for me to say 



a little about myself. Since my arrival I have 
been shifted around to quite a few places. At 
first I was located at a Casual Depot and from 
there I was sent to General Headquarters. 
Only remained in the latter place about three 
days when I was sent to one of our most im- 
portant stations in the Advance Section. I re- 
mained there six weeks and really liked the 
work very much. I was next transferred to the 
Transportation Department at Paris. While 
there I had a most pleasant position as stenog- 
rapher to one of the Deputy D. G. T's. 

After about a month the officer for whom 
I worked was given a new position and he had 
me go along with him to Tours, where I still 
am. It is my expectation to be sent back again 
to the office of the D. G. T. I have asked for 
such a transfer and feel sure that it will be 
effected. I am still an A. F. C, but am inclined 
to believe that when I am placed with the 
Transportation Department I will have an 
opportimity of securing a commission. 

Just now we are all watching with the greatest 
interest the Big Drive which is on. Everyone 
seems very confident that the result will be 
most favorable and wc are all pulling hard for 
it. The country around this particular section 
is most beautiful and it is certainly a pleasure 
to take a nice long stroll on Sunday afternoons, 
when we have a half-holiday. 

There are cjuite a few Baltimore and Ohio 
boys in this towTi and we see one another cjuite 
often; in fact there are so many boys here from 
Baltimore that I oft times wonder if I'm really 
so far away after all. We have a wonderful 
Y. M. C. A. up town where most of the officers 
and our crowd eat and it surely is a comfortable 
place. The "Y" is doing a wonderful woi-k 
and deserves moie credit thnn it ever could be 



43 



44 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



given. I am comfortably located in a nice 
"chambre" with a French family, as are all 
officers and field clerks, and we are more than 
grateful for the comforts of a home. With 
best wishes to yourself and everyone in the 
office, I am. 

Sincerely yours, 

Harry J. Hunt, 



My Dear Mr. Murray: 

You and Mrs. Murray are wondering why I 
have not written to you since my arrival over 
here. I have thought of you many times, but 
after reaching this old land we have moved 
about a good deal and I thought it best to wait 
until we got settled. I feel that I am very 
fortunate in landing with Colonel Wilgers and 
Lieutenant Homer to start with to act as the 
chief clerk in the office. They both are very 
fine men and have been very considerate 
already. The work will increase, no doubt, 
considerably from now on and the hours will be 
necessarily long, but if I can only please them 
here I shall feel fully repaid for having made 
the trip across. 

I believe that Harry Hunt has written you 
that we are working on the same floor. He and 
I have been together practically every night 
since my arrival. I am sure we have rehashed 
everything that ever happened in the Presi- 
dent's office during the years we were together 
there and have enjoyed many a laugh over some 
of the things which took place. Last night 
Harry, Norman Ryan and I went to a musical 
comedy and we certainly did enjoy it. This is 
a very beautiful country and there are lots of 
interesting things to see. Once while at a 
camp near which we landed, the lieutenant 
gave us permission to go to town and several 
of us went through an old castle dating back 
to H. C. Then, too, the old churches and 
cathedrals are (juite attractive and we have 
also visifcrd sev(;ral of th(;m. 

I know this dreadful war cannot last forev(!r, 
and when it is xjver I anticipate much ph^asun; 
in 8C0ing you again. This is an opportunity 
and a great privilege for me and I am glad to 
have it. I am now a sergeant. 

Very sincerely, 

Samuel S. M. DuBols. 

('ar(! D. (m. T., American Expeditionary 
Force, A. P. O. 717, France. 



Dear Mother: 

This makes the third time that I am writing, 
and I have not heard from home since I left. 
That is my hard luck. The mail is chasing us, 
and every time it gets anywhere near, we move 
on. or go out on a trip. Just now we are on a 
trip, and will probably not get anywhere where 
we can get mail until the end of the week. 
I have gotten one letter since I last saw you — 
and it was from a girl in Philadelphia and did 
not amount to a gadget. 

I was ashore on recreation last Sunday 
morning, and heard a band of 480 or 500, I 
forget which, led by Sousa. The setting aided 
the effect of the music — in a corner of the 
grounds, where the field met the woods there 
is a large baseball diamond, and in the center 
of this diamond the band sat. The officers 
and their wives had the grandstand (such as it 
is) and the enlisted men and midshipmen 
occupied the bleachers. The band was arrang- 
ing their music, the audience was humming 
with conversation, and beyond the birds were 
singing in the trees. Suddenly Sousa arose, 
and for a moment there was absolute silence, 
even the birds stopped singing to look for the 
cause of the silence of their human co-listeners. 
The hand of the great leader arose, paused, and 
as it descended twenty bands from different 
men-of-war began simultaneously to play. 
It mattered not that they perhaps had never 
plaj'ed together before, the magnetism of 
Sousa held and directed them as a unit. 

Among the pieces they played were "A Hunt- 
ing Scene," "A Baby's Prayer at Twilight," 
a medley of American airs, the ''Star-Spangled 
Banner," and "The Stars and Stripes Forever." 

While ashore I met some of the fellows who 
were at camp with me at Saunder's Range- 
Ward, Frush, Abell and Musselman. They are 
still on the old Massachusetts, the ship that 
I enjoyed being on. 

Doubtless by now the cold spell and your cold 
are buried and "snowed" under with June 
sunshine. I know how cold it was, for one 
night I slept on the forecastle, and at three in 
the morning I found myself awake, and curled 
up in such a tight knot that the moon could not 
find me between the mattress and the two 
blankets. 

With Love, 

W. Reid Irving. 

Isl Class Yeoman, V. S. S. Wisconsin. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



45 



To the Editor: 

We take pleasure in letting you hear from 
two old employes, now serving the government 
in the navy and in the army. We have been 
doing foreign service for the past few months 
and upon our last return voyage from France 
our boat was torpedoed and sunk by a German 
submarine. Our ship, the U. S. S. President 
Lincoln, was in the transport service and had 
made several successful voyages. 

After the submarine had sunk the vessel we 
took to the water on rafts and in life boats and 
then in about one-half an hour the ''sub" 
appeared on the surface and cruised around and 
about the life boats and rafts. They took one 
of our officers prisoner and gave us quite a 
scare when it looked for a while that they were 
going to fire upon us. However, the submarine 
commander seemed to be a good sport and he 
left us without taking any further prisoners or 



firing on us. We were in the water on rafts for 
quite a long time and were finally picked up by 
our own destroyers, who had come out from the 
base in France. It was sure a good sight, out 
there in the briny deep, to have our rescuers 
come out to save us at midnight. 

To the readers of the Employes Magazine, 
we want them to know that the boys of the 
Baltimore and Ohio are doing their bit for 
Uncle Sam. Now that we have had our first 
taste of real warfare we are returning home for 
a few weeks, only to be sent out again to fight 
in this world battle to uphold our rights and to 
protect our people. 

Yours for the old Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road. 

R. W. Verts, 
Fireman, First Class, U. S. Navy. 
A. C. Phillips, 
Corporal, Tank Corps, U. S. Army. 




BACKING INTO AN INDUSTRIAL PLANT LOOKING THE WRONG WAY 
EYES FORWARD IS A GOOD RULE TO FOLLOW IX RAILROADING 




Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of June, 1918, and to whom 
pensions have been granted: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Bowman, Thomas B.. 

Heron, John D 

Howard, Edward 

Sherman, Christian . 
Taylor, Charles C. . . 
Vanhom, Lindsay M. 



Engineer 

Engineer 

Boiler Maker 

Laborer 

Crossing Watchman 
Brakeman 



Illinois 

Cumberland . 

Illinois 

Chicago 

C. T I Indiana 

C. T 1 Cumberland 



C. T. 
C. T. 
M. P. 
M. P. 



46 
39 
34 
22 
45 
45 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll, contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1917, over $312,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature, to 
those who had been honorably retired. 



The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,400,963.45. 



The following employes, after serving the Company faithfully for a number of years, have 



died: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



Armiger, Thomas A.. . Carpenter 

Brown, Marshall H.. i Conductor 

Payne, James M ' Laborer 

Fowles, Alfred A Carpenter 

Carr, Wesley C Crossing Watchman 

McKinnell, James H.. Machinist 

Cullinan, James Material Distributer 



DEPART- 
MENT 


DIVISION 


DATE OF 
DEATH 


YEARS OF 
SERVICE 


M. of W. 


Baltimore, , 


June 1, 1918. . . 


24 


C. T 


Monongah 


June 1, 1918. 


37 


M. P. . . 


Newark 


June 11, 1918.. 


20 


M. of W. 


Pittsburgh .... 


May 6, 1918.. . 


25 


C. T... 


Baltimore 


June 22, 1918.. 


30 


M. P. . . 


Baltimore 


June 25, 1918.. 


30 


Stores . . 


Newark 


June 20, 1918. 


40 



4fi 



Another Baltimore and Ohio Man Gives 

Life for Nation 



A TELEGRAM received at Weston, W.Va., 
announces that Sergeant Thomas H. 
Wales, aged twenty-four, a member of 
the United States Marine Corps, was killed 
in action in 
France, on 
June 6. Mr. 
Wales had 
served an en- 
listment in 
the marines 
several years 
ago and in 
April of last 
year the gov- 
ernment so- 
licited him 
to re-enlist 
and he did 
so, arriving 
in France in 
August, serv- 
ing there un- 
til he fell in 
action. 

Mr. Wales 
was a well- 
known and 
w e 1 1 - 1 i k e d 
])oy at home. 
When he en- 
listed last 
year he was 
serving as a 
Baltimore 
and Ohio 
brakeman. 
He was popu- 
lar in sports, 
having tak- 
en an active 
part in base- 
ball and foot- 
ball. He is the first Lewis County boy to be 
killed in action, but the fifth to die in the 
service since war was declared. He is survived 
by his mother, Mrs. Emma Wales, an employe 
of the Weston State Hospital; three sisters, 




SERGEANT T. H. WALES 



Mrs. Lee Wilson, of Weston, Mrs. James 
Waggy, of Pittsburgh, and Mrs. Veta Barnes, 
of Lewis County, and one brother, Wade, who 
is now in the army in France. He was 

a nephew of 
J. A. Sim- 
mons and 
Mrs. C. A. 
Taylor, of 
Weston. 

The fol- 
lowing tele- 
gram was 
received 
by S e r - 
geant Wales' 
mother: 

Mrs. Emma 
Wales, 

General De- 
livery, Wes- 
ton, W. Va. 

Deeply re- 
gret to state 
that a cable- 
gram receiv- 
ed from a- 
b r o a d a d - 
vises that 
Sergeant 
Thomas Hen- 
ry Wales, Ma- 
rine Corps, 
was killed in 
action on 
June sixth. 
Body will be 
interred a- 
broad until 
end of war. 
Accept my 
great sorrow, 
his life for 



your 
gave 



heartfelt sympathy in 
Sergeant Wales nobly 
his country. 

Major Barnett, 

Major General Commandant 



47 



I Was Just Thinking — 

By Miss Floy Whitmore, 

Master Mechanic's Office, Lorain, Ohio 



NOWADAYS we hear a great deal about 
conservation. The cry is to conserve 
the food, the supplies and even the day- 
light. But most of all we realize we must 
conserve the man power of our country in this 
hour of need. It is true that people have for 
years been studying how to prolong and better 
life in general, but the great conflict "over 
there" is an unlooked for drain on our men. 
Statistics show that deaths due to accidents 
are a close second. 

It may be the most common of every day 
affairs that suddenly become the unexpected 
means of someone losing his life or being 
crippled. The thing may happen, not so much 
through our own fault, as through the negli- 
gence or faulty workmanship of someone else. 
Take, for instance, the case of a switchman 
who was crushed between two cars, when, 
owing to improper loading by someone miles 
away, a car of huge ingots brook loose from a 
string of cars and pinned him against another 
car. 

But I l)elieve that most of the accidents 
may be classed under one of the three following 
causes: — First, ignorance, which may be due 
to a superior's lack of instruction; second, 
thoughtlessness — how many times a man says: 
"Yes, I knew that if I did so and so it would 
happen, but I didn't think;" and last, but not 
least, is carelessness. Often upon coming to 
work in the morning we see any number of 
women and children climbing cars to which 
engines are attached and throwing ofT coal to 
others scrambling around the cars. There is 
no denying that they know better, for they 
have been warned, but it is a spirit of bravado 
and recklessness that encourages them to 
"show off." 

A Sad Example 

Last summer a very sad examph; of ignorance 
came to my attention when an aged lady and 
her granddaughter, who were new to the work 
around the yards, took their lunch in the shade 
of some box cars on a siding and sat down and 
leaned against the wheels. A car was "kicked" 
further up the track and it came crashing into 



the cars on the siding. They jolted along 
and the aged lady fell under the wheels and 
was crushed. She did not know her danger 
and no one saw her in time to warn them. 

Nine-tenths of the accidents could be pre- 
vented if people would only use common sense. 
In the first place, if you are new to the work, 
find out either from your foreman or the 
"Safety First" book just what to avoid. Then 
keep these things in mind. If you find anyone 
else, for instance, carelessly striking rivets 
without any precaution as to where they may 
fall, call his attention to the damage that is 
done almost daily by flying rivets. Goggles 
are supplied for those whose work might cause 
injury to their eyes, but some fellows say: "Oh, 
that is too much trouble." So is the pain 
and torture of losing one's eyesight, but they 
don't think of that either. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad has taken 
great pains to inform its employes along these 
lines and takes pride in providing means of 
protection, among which might be mentioned 
the first aid boxes, fire drills, booklets on 
safety, blue flag track warnings, safety meet- 
ings, and even a becoming and most sensible 
uniform for their women employes. Every 
precaution which is called to its attention as 
being worthy of consideration is adopted. 

Let us suppose an accident has occurred. 
Amidst the usual confusion at such times, 
perhaps the persons who know which doctor 
to call are out of the office. After finding out 
his name, someone frantically fingers through 
the telephone book for his number. Then, 
perhaps, he is home, or at the hospital, or any 
place except where you want him most. If 
the doctor's home and office numbers and the 
aml)ulance number were posted as conveniently 
near th(; phone as is the "Keep Smiling" card 
(when you couldn't smile if it were to kill the 
Kaiser), how much valuable time could be saved. 

Speeding Up 

We are urged to "speed up and win the war," 
whi(*h we must and WILL DO. But that 
Hieans speed up on production, not injuries. 



48 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



49 



It is better to be a little too careful with our 
machines or ourselves than a little too care- 
less. I remember a little story which I think 
illustrates the point. 

A certain rich, but very eccentric old man, 
advertised for a chauffeur. Every applicant 
was taken out to a steep precipice and asked 
how close he could drive without going over. 
One young fellow went so far as to say that he 
believed he could drive within a couple of 
inches and not go down. The old man turned 
to a quiet looking young man and asked him 



if he could not do better than that. After a 
brief look down the yawning chasm he replied: 
'*No, sir; I would keep just as far away from 
there as I could get." 
He got the job. 

We might paraphrase the old railroad sign of 
"Stop, Look and Listen" into ''Know, Think 
and Pay Attention," and, above all, I believe 
that some of us have learned from bitter ex- 
perience that rather than to lay the blame 
on poor old Columbus and take a chance, it is 
better to always play ''Safety First." 



□ □ □ 



Former Railroad Man's Son Brave American **Ace" 



Friends of the late S. D. Hill, for many years 
a Baltimore and Ohio Railroad conductor on the 
Springfield Division, have been elated by reports 
that recently have come from France that his 
son. Lieutenant Robert E. Hill, of the United 
States Air Corps, has distinguished himself. 
With a bombing squadron, he attacked four Ger- 
man airplanes, routed them and then he and his 
companions bombed the railroad station and 
yards at Conflans, inflicting great material dam- 
age that will cause the Hims some worry. 



Lieutenant Hill's machine showed fourteen 
places where German shells had struck it, but 
the Springfield officer maintained his pluck 
and glided back to the American lines. In 
passing No Man's Land he was scarcely 100 
feet above the groimd and a fine target for anti- 
aircraft gims. But the spirit which made con- 
ductor Hill one of the most loyal employes the 
railroad has ever had, was inherited by the 
sonj who seems to be on the brink of a notable 
army career. 



□ □ □ 



Veterans Wish Them Success 



A. W. Thompson, former traffic vice-president 
and now Federal Manager of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Lines, East, with jurisdiction over 
the Western Maryland Railway, and C. W. 
Gallow^ay, former General Manager of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Western Lines, but who 
is now Federal Manager of the Company's 
lines. West, received letters of congratulation 
from the Baltimore Division of the Veteran 
Employes' Association upon their being selected 
by the United States Railroad Administra- 
tion as representatives of the government. Fol- 
lowing is a copy of a letter which was sent 
to each official: 

Veteran Employes' Association 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
baltimore division 

Baltimore, June 20, 1918. 
My Dear Sir: 

The announcement of your appoint- 
ment as Federal Manager of the Balti- 



more and Ohio Railroad Lines has been 
received by the members of the Balti- 
more Division, Veteran Association, 
with a great deal of pleasure, and 
while it is felt that the honor was 
fully merited we beg to offer our con- 
gratulations on your elevation to this 
important post, and to assure you that 
the members of this association will 
cooperate in every possible way to 
make your administration a glowing 
success. 

We express the hope that you may 
be blessed with an abundance of good 
health to sustain you in doing your 
bit to win the war. 

By order of the Executive Board. 

Yours truly, 

W. II. Shaw, 

Recording Secretary. 



A Message to You From 
President Wilson 



''Preventable Fire is more than a pi-ivate 
misfortune. It is public dereliction. At a time 
like this, of emergency and of manifest necessity 
for the conservation of national resources, it is 
more than ever a matter of deep and pressing 
consecjuence that every means should be taken 
to prevent this evil." 

(Signed) AVoodrow Wilson. 

Heed the warning of our Chief Executive: 
The continuous operation of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad is a necessary part of our fight against the 
"Hun." Destruction of our property by fire reduces our 
efficiency and is a victory for the enemy. Join the Fire 
Prevention Campaign. 

Be careful in your work when handling fire or hazard- 
ous supplies. 

Don't allow packing material, rubbish or similar 
things to accunudate where stray sparks may set 
them afire. 

Don't let your neighbor or fellow-workman take 
chances which may burn you, as well as himself, out 
of a job. 

Kej)ort anything you cannot correct yourself to the 
person in charge, or direct to 

Office General Superintendent Police, 
FiRK Prevention Bureau, 
Baltlmore, Ml). 




The Question of How to Dress a Girl Becomingly Solved 

by this Design 



|T is not always an easy matter to 
dress a girl becomingly, because 
girls vary so greatly in size 
according to their ages. Of all 
difficult ages, the years from eleven to fif- 
teen are most puzzling to dress. The 
model shown here is appropriate for any 




SCALLOP 

N9IIG59 




GIRL'S FROCK IN CHECK GINGHAM 



age between six and sixteen and is pretty, 
made of check gingham with collar and 
cuffs of white pique with scallops button- 
holed in blue cotton. The back of the 
waist and skirt are cut in one, the front 
and side gores being attached to the 
front of the waist under the belt. At 
the front there is a plait, to the left of 
which the adjustment is effected. The 
waist closes in front. Twelve-year size 
requires 3 yarc s 36-inch gingham with 
5^ yard 36-inch pique for trimming. 

The simplest way of cutting the dress 
properly is as shown in the guide. Sec- 
tion '^L" containing the back of the 
waist and back gore is placed so that the 
triple "TTT" perforations rest along the 
lengthwise fold. The side gore comes 
next, with large '^C" perforations along 
a lengthwise thread. In the space op- 
posite these two sections the belt is laid, 
with ^^T" perforation on a crosswise 
thread of the material. The front gore 
of the skirt and the collar must be placed 
with ''T" perforations along the length- 
wise fold of material. The remaining 
sections, consisting of the front of the 
waist, pocket, cuff and sleeve, are laid 
on the gingham with large '^O" perfora- 
tions resting on a lengthwise thread. 

The first step toward construction is 
to turn the hem in the waist front notch. 
Then, gather the lower front edge be- 
tween '^T" perforations. Turn edge of 
side gore under on slot perforations, 
lap on front gore with notches and edges 
underneath even and stitch to position 



51 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



CUTTING GUIDE. 7T4rO ?l,o^^m8 S./c 12 5£LVAGe fc.PC.E5 




one inch from folded edge; leave seam to 
left of center-front free above single 
large ''0'' perforations in front gore and 
finish for closing. Sew gores to lower 
edge of waist front, with notches and 
center-fronts even; bring seam under- 
neath plait to small ''o" perforation in 
front section; leave the left front of 
waist free forward of the small ''o" per- 
foration, draw gathers to the required 
size and stitch tape underneath the 
gathers. Close under-arm and shoulder 
seams as notched. Turn hem at lower' 
edge of dress on small ''o" perforations. 




Next, face the collar and sew the neck 
edge V ith notches and center-backs 
even. Now, close the seams of sleeve 
and elbow cuff as notches. Line cuffs 
and sew to lower edge with seams even. 
Sew sleeve in armhole, holding toward 
you when basting in the armhole. The 
cuffs and collar should be embroidered 
before cut. 

Take the pockets and form plaits, 
bringing together and stitching along 
the corresponding lines of small ^'o" 
perforations. Open each box-plait keep- 
ing seam at center and press. Adjust 
pocket A on front of waist and pocket 
E on side gore with upper edges be- 
tween indicating small ^'o" perforations 
and stitch side and lower edges to posi- 
tion. 

Finally, line the belt and arrange 
around the waist with upper edge at 
small '^o" perforation near center-back. 
Slip end through a buckle and close in 
front. 

Pictorial Review Girls' and Juniors' Dress 
No. 7740. Sizes, 6 to 16 years. Price, 20 cents. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale at local 
dealers. 



Frocks of Sheer Stuffs Realize Patriotic Ideal 
of Material Conservation 

By Maude Hall 



[ANY a woman has lost a repu- 
tation for idleness since the war 
began, and everyone is better 
and bigger for the test which 
conchtions have imposed. Home dress- 
making, a f(iw seasons ago a lost art, is 
und(?rgoing a renaissance, with the num- 
ber of women going in for it constantly 
increasing. Instead of being a vague 
sul)j(H,'t, the planiniig and putting to- 
gether of a frock is t)ecofning a matter 
of general knowledge. After all, the 
secTct of home dressmaking is enterprise 
and })atience. 



The purpose of saving money is driv- 
ing hundreds of women to undertake 
what hitherto has been considered a 
tedious and confining job. Now, how- 
ever, with good patterns they are able to 
turn out simple cotton frocks which 
answer every purpose and the making 
of whi(;h will give them experience for 
the building of serges and satins at a 
later tim(\ 

The chief objective of fashion de- 
sigruM's just now is to place style under 
the yoke of thrift, and th(\y are creating 
f Ihmi* most chai ining models upon econom- 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



53 



ical lines, as far as yardage is concerned. 
Of course one may drift far out upon the 
sea of extravagance when it comes to 
trimmings, but expensive materials and 
embellishments are not indispensable 
to smart appearance. It is well to select 
a good quality fabric for the firm founda- 
tion upon which the simple home-made 
cotton frock shall take its stand, five or 
six yards being sufficient for the average 
model. Add to this a really good 
pattern without complicated structure 
and the merest tyro should be able 
to turn out a desirable dress. If the 
material is exceedingly sheer, it will 
be all the better if it is entirely made by 
hand. 

Pretty enough to tempt the most in- 
experienced dressmaker is a model in 
figured batiste. Over the two-piece skirt 
is dropped a tunic with straight line and 
the simple waist is trimmed with a 
deep collar and vest of white organdy, 
the collar being edged with lace. A belt 
of self-material gives an unpretentious 
and thoroughly satisfactory finish to the 
waist. 

Combinations of materials are as smart 
as ever and there is inexpressible jaunti- 
ness about a frock of check gingham and 
plain chambray. The plain gathered 
skirt is trimmed with a deep band of 
check gingham, stitched about four inches 
from the lower edge. 

The blouse, also of the check material, 
has an open front and an inset vest of 
handkerchief linen, the upper edge of 
which is cut off in square effect and 
hemstitched. Buttons trim the long one- 
piece sleeves and there is a removable 
jumper which extends below the waist 
at the back in peplum effect. 

Equally desirable for city or country 
wear is a model in biege Liberty crepe, 
which is all cotton, though it looks hke 
silk and which can be tied in hard knots 
without leaving a wrinkle. The skirt 
is gathered to a simple bodice under a 
belt of self -material. A large collar of 
tub satin finishes the open front and the 
vestee is slashed and laced at the center 
front. This new material comes in 
many delightful colors, but seems to be 
liked best in the natural tints and the 
soul satisfying Japanese blues. 



Swiss organdys, wonderfully figured, 
make fascinating frocks. Bands of plain 
white organdy stitched around the pep- 
lum emphasize the design in a blue and 
white model. The front of the waist is 
in Eton style, finished with a shawl collar. 
The vestee fastens in surplice effect 
giving a V-shaped outline to the neck. 
The Swiss organdys are fabrics of fairy- 
like beauty, not alone in the sheer, misty 
unadorned variety, but also in the cross- 
barred, figured, striped or tiny block 
check patterns in self colors which are 
to the fore this season. 

The dress with moderately snug waist- 
line and widened hip is constantly 
growing in favor. A type approved by 
women of liberal and conservative taste 
alike, is developed in green chambray, 
the only note of trimming being a crochet 
edge for the pockets, cuffs and collar. 
The skirt is gathered to the waist under 
a very deep girdle buttoned in front to 
simulate the adjustment of the blouse. 

Braid is used to decorate many a 
simple frock of gingham, voile, etc. It 
is applied sparingly, but always with 
telling effect. Quite pretty is a white 
cotton pique, with gathered skirt edged 
with braid. It is worn with a blouse 
that is gathered at the front, the neck 
being cut in V-shape and finished with 
a round collar. The waist has attached 
peplum sections and patch pockets to 
give it a distinctive note. All of these 
details are, of course, emphasized by a 
trimming of braid. 

Lovely lawns and linen mixtures, 
quite as sheer as handkerchief linen, 
are shown in the shops for use in making 
up the better type of wash frocks. They 
are offered in an immense number of 
charming designs in stripes, spots, or 
checks as well as in plain colors, though 
they are by no means reliable in the 
matter of holding color. 

Of particular importance to the well- 
dressed woman are sunshades, shoes and 
hats. Some original persons have in- 
troduced parasols of organdy and of 
gingham for summer occasions. A model 
in black gingham lined with striped 
batiste is most unusual and becoming to 
wear with any frock. Something else 
quite out of the ordinary is the sunshade 



54 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



of check taffeta ornamented with tiny 
organdy ruffles. It is permissible to 
make one's parasol as fluffy as possible 
by bu3'ing one of plain silk with a good 
wooden handle and adding as man}' tiny 
organd}' ruffles as look well. Any one 
who is clever with the needle can do 
this. 

Many hats are made of organdy and 
gingham to match parasols. There are 



also lovely models in taffeta, crepe geor- 
gette, satin, etc. Elaborate trimming is 
not allowed on a realty smart hat and 
even when feathers are used, there is no 
other ornament. 

There was never a season when women 
paid so much attention to the appear- 
ance of their feet as now. Although 
hosiery is not so luxuriant as last season, 
it is pretty. 




The Needleworker^s Corner 



1 



Pretty Novelties in Filet Crochet Suitable 
for Chairs and Trays 

By Katherine Mutterer 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



BHE remarkable adaptability of 
filet ci-ochet has macle it worthy 
of universal acceptance l)y wo- 
men who like needlework. It is 
so simjjle that even those who cannot be 
persuaded to do any other form of crochet 
take to it rea(Uly. In the first place, the 



No. H-VWA.'V ( I IDV 



designs, in most instances, are (;asy to 
follow and an absence of variety in 
stitches means no sacrifice ol the beauty 
of M, filf't cioclicf piece. 



The chair tidy illustrated is typical 
of the newest designs in filet crochet and 
it makes a charming decoration for cush- 
ions of denim and other materials in 
plain colors. The design is so simple in 
fact, that it even will not jar with 
cretonne effects." There is nothing pret- 
tier for the summer cottage or even for 




No. f)8-\VILl) KOSi; THAV CLOTH 

the city hom(\ In eitluT white oi* vvvu 
the tidy is attractive. In size it meas- 
ures Hj/^ by 113/2 inches and nHjuires 
one ball of crochet cotton No. SO and a 
steel hook No. 14. After the tidv is com- 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



55 



pleted a dainty scallop is added all 
around. 

Unusually handsome is the serving 
tray cloth because its shape is unique 
and its design one that is in great de- 
mand.' The floral motifs show up espe- 
cially well in filet crochet and the wild 
rose is a general favorite. The mahogany 
frame forms a suitable setting for the old 
rose back-ground over which the filet 
cloth is laid. The crochet oval is at- 
tached, to a center of white linen. If 
desired a monogram or initial may be 
embroidered in the linen. 

The making of filet crochet is the 
most fascinating of all kinds of crochet 



as one can work the design without 
having to follow minute directions. For 
the woman who desires the beautiful 
things of life there is no better way by 
which the result can be accomplished 
with so little outlay of money as by 
making crochet pieces for the home or 
for gifts. 

P^iLET CiiocHET TiiAY Cloth No. C8. Direc- 
tions and working pattern, 10 cents. 

Filet Crochet Chair Tidy No. 8. Direc- 
tions and working patterns, 10 cents. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale at local 
dealers. 























iiyi! 






Modern Locomotive Valves and Valve Gears 
By Charles L. McShane 

This is an entirely new book covering the 
subject of valves and valve gears now in general 
use and contains a vast amount of new and up^ 
to-date and practical matter. Much has not 
heretofore been published. Concisely written, 
it is as plain, common-sense form as the subject 
and the English language will admit. The 
treatise contains just the kind of information 
that a practical shop or road man constantly 
needs to keep in touch with the requirements 
of the present day. The fine points that puzzle 
so many men are treated with clearness and 
simplicity. The many illustrations show the 
working operations of the various valves 
clearly. Bound in fine cloth, $2.50. Griffin & 
Winters, publishers, Chicago, 111. 

Regulation of Railways 
By Samuel O. Dunn 

The purpose of this volume, finished since the 
United States Government assumed control of 
the railroads, is to review fully the policy which 
has been followed in the regulation of American 
Railways, especially during the last ten years, 
and pointing out both weak and strong points 



in the system, the ways in which it has done 
some harm and" the ways in which it has been of 
public benefit. It also discusses at length the 
timely and vitally important question of 
Government OAvnership, and takes cognizance 
of the developments in the railway situation 
since the war began. It is a clear discussion 
of the railroad situation by a well-known author- 
ity on the outside. Canadian regulation also 
is analyzed by Mr. Dunn, who is editor of 
Railway Age. Bound in cloth, $1.75 net. 
D. Appleton & Co., New York, publishers. 

Wake Up America 

By Mark Sullivan 

The shipping problem is the big problem of 
the present hour. Upon it depends, more than 
is generally realized, the successful termination 
of the war. In this little book Mark Sullivan 
discusses the question with his customary fear- 
less frankness. The coal scarcity, the wheat 
and munitions scarcity and the man scarcity, he 
resolves into terms of ships and shows how each 
one of these crises result from our rapidly ac- 
celerating scarcity of ships. The book is 
timely and its theme of the utmost importance 
to all who would understand our national situa- 
tion. Bound in paper, 60 cents. Published by 
The Macmillan Company, New York. 



Genius is two per cent, inspiration and ninety-eight per cent. 

perspiration'* — Edison 




Staten Island Division 

While train No. 454 was reaching St. George 
Terminal, trainman G. C. Decker noticed de- 
fective equipment on engine 8. The train was 
stopped and defect repaired. He has been 
commended for his keen observation. 

On May 29 engineer E. Parker, train No. 35, 
after leaving Huguenot and while approaching 
a green signal, noticed a tree across the tracks. 
He applied the brakes and stopped the train 
before reaching the obstruction. He sent his 
fireman out with a flag to protect the east- 
bound train. Mr. Parker has been deservedly 
commended. 

On June 11 trainman R. McCafTerty volun- 
teered to fire engine attached to train No. 11 
and the train arrvied on time at St. George 
from Tottenville. Mr. McCafTerty has been 
commended for his voluntary services. It is 
such men as he who are helping win the war. 

Operator A. B. Scheer of Western Avenue 
train order station on June 14, while extra 1638 
was passing at 2.25 a. m., noticed defective 
equipment on C. M. & St. P. car 58486. He look 
prompt action in having train stopped and defect 
attended to. He has been commended. 

Extra 1603 cast in charge of engineer C. E. 
Wynans, Jr., June 16, while approaching the 
llichmond Light & Jlailroad Company plant 
at Livingston, noticed a pile of timbers close to 
the eastward track which only cleared the right 
hand cylind(^r of (!ngine about one inch. He 
8to[)iK;d, vv(;nt back, notified watchman, arid 
HHsistfid the watchman in moving the timbers 
a safe fliHlaricc from the track. IU\ is hereby 
commended for his keen observation and 
I)rornpt act ion. 



Chicago Division 

On May 22 section foreman Otto Wiebeck 
observed defective equipment on car in train 
of extra 4246. He succedeed in having train 
stopped. 

On May 20 operator M. C. Hildred, Defiance, 
Ohio, observed and reported door open on 
train No. 94. The door was closed and boards, 
which were projecting out over track, were 
replaced. 

On May 14 brakeman A. E. Coffing, with 
extra west, engine 4289, discovered defective 
rail west of Hamler, Ohio. He immediately 
took steps to have repairs made. For his prompt 
action he has been commended. 

On May 1 engineer C. E. Hart and fireman 
Neil Miller, with engine 4293, discovered defec- 
tive equipment. They assisted in disconnect- 
ing engine and brought it into Garrett without 
further damage. For their good judgment 
under these conditions they have been com- 
mended. 

Ohio Division 

Lamj)man Thomas Lanane found broken frog 
l)olt on house track frog at Dundas, June 9, 
which made it very dangerous for westbound 
trains. He made temjKirary repairs and noti- 
fied sectionmen. 

L. A. Pausch, supervisor, recived a cigar box 
containing eight or ten pounds of strap lead 
fr(»m torjM'does picked up by Ehner Jones along 
the track. Mr. Jones is to Ix; commended for 
his t houghtfuhiess. 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



57 




ARTHUR WIDENER 



Indiana Division 

On Jiine 28 Edward Sherber, brakeman on 
extra 2720, west, after leaving Loogootee, discov- 

ered water along the 

track and stood on 
rear end of caboose to 
keep a close lookout 
for washouts. West 
of Black Oak, he 
found water had cut 
through from north 
side of track to 
south side for a 
space of about six 
feet. He also lo- 
cated two other 
dangerous places. He reported to conductor 
W. C. Cox and repairs were made. 

Above is a photograph of Arthur Widener, 
son of engineer J. M. Widener, age seventeen, 
who, while standing at pen stock at Cochran 
waiting for his father, noticed defective equip- 
ment on Southern car 343059 in extra 2720 east. 
He called the conductor's attention to it. This 
boy's alertness is very commendable. 

While extra 2669 east, conductor A. Hodapp, 
was passing Dabney, operator R. C. Moore 
detected a defective equipment in train. He 
immediately proceeded to give stop signal to 
trainmen and succeeded in having train stopped. 
'His close observance of such a defect is to be 
commended. 

R. C. Moore, agent-operator at Dabney, Ind., 
on June 19 noticed defective equipment on car 
in extra 2669 east, when train was passing his 
station. He succeeded in stopping train and 
notified crew of the defect before any damage 
occurred. 

He has been commended for his close atten- 
tion to duty. 

On June 10 Thomas Rowland, supervisor 
Washington Sub-division, detected defective 
equipment on 77034 when car was being handled 
in extra 2750 west, in charge of conductor A. 
Hodapp. The car was set out at Mitchell and 
repairs made. 

Baltimore Division 

On June 12 supervisor A. G. Zepp noticed 
defective equipment on a box car at Grays, 
Md., and train was stopped at Marriottsville, 



where car was repaired. There were seventy- 
five empties in the train and the repairing of 
the defect necessitated a delay of twenty-six 
minutes. 

One of foreman Pickett's men at east end 
of pull-out switch, HoUofields, noticed defective 
equipment on a car in center of the train. 
When the train arrived at Gaithers the car was 
found to be ofT center. This man's alertness 
is commendable. 

On May 29 operator E. B. Cimningham, who 
had worked the second trick at F tower 
Washington, until midnight, walked to Q tower 
in order that he might take No. 3, then back- 
ing into Washington. On arrival at the tower 
he found that extra west engine 1391 was 
being delayed owing to the absence of a flag- 
man. He volunteered to act as flagman from 
Washington to Brunswick. Mr. Cunningham 
has been commended for this act of loyalty to 
the Company. It may be remembered that it 
was Mr. Cunningham who, on April 11, volun- 
teered to fire engine 4311 from Washington 
Jimction from midnight until six o'clock the fol- 
lowing morning. Not only is Mr. Cunningham 
helping the Company, but he is also making 
a fine display of patriotism, especially in these 
days when delays are so obstructive to the 
moving of supplies for our boys overseas, 

Connellsville Division 

On May 19 as extra 2589 west passed Stoyes- 
town at 5.04 p. m., R. E. Robertson, second trick 
operator, Stoyestown, Pa., noticed a defect on 
a car in that train, and promptly notified the 
crew at Hooversville, which had necessary 
repairs made. Superintendent Broughton has 
commended Mr. Robertson. 

Cumberland Division 

While extra 4049 west was passing Green 
Spring May 29, operator J. D. Rockwell noticed 
defective equipment on Baltimore and Ohio car 
126998. He informed conductor Ridgeway, 
who had defect repaired. 

While extra 4856 west was passing McKenzie 
June 12, operator F. L. Byrd observed door on 
south side XJ. P. car 71983 swinging toward 
adjoining track. He had train stopped at Rawl- 
ings and had door closed. 



58 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Cleveland Division 

On May 28 W. A. Shaw, fireman of engine 
4283, while passing N. D. Pit, noticed rod 
across rail on westbound track and promptly 
notified engineer of the obstruction. The train 
was stopped and rod removed. He has been 
commended by the superintendent for his 
watchfuhiess. 

On May 29 engineer M. L. Donohoe and fire- 
man G. F. Miner in charge of engine No. 4299 
brought train, consisting of fifty-nine loads, 
4,891 adjusted tons, from HoUoway to Lorain 
without taking coal at any point along the line, 
a distance of 123 miles. On arrival at Lorain 
this engine only had one ton of coal left on tank. 
On arrival at Lorain it was found that the 
cylinder packing on this engine was worn on the 
left side and was blowing, also that one unit had 
bursted and four others leaking. This would 
cause the engine to burn between three and four 
tons more coal than it would if the cylinder 
packing was not blowing or the units leaking. 
Both of these men have been commended by 
the superintendent for the efficient handling of 
engine on this trip. 

On June 9 engineer E. C. Kuhn and fireman 
T. Menke,in charge .of engine No. 4062, was held 
up at Dover on account of head broken off of 
tail bolt on right side. The jaws on butt end 
had gapped open about one inch. Engineer 
Kuhn secured a tail bolt at Dover and with the 
assistance of fireman Menke replaced the broken 
one. These repairs were made while they were 
waiting on trains which they were ordered to 
meet at that point, and there was no delay to 
engine or train. They have received letters 
of commendation by the superintendent. 

Toledo Division 

On June 2 fireman Harry A. Reid was dead- 
heading from Barr yard to Chicago on freight 
train of 110 cars with engine 2579, engineer 
Latshaw and conductor Henncsey. Shortly 
after boarding his train Mr. Reid discovered the 
fifty-first car from engine to have all brasses 
rni.s.Ming on one side and the journals cut through 



the boxes and into the arch bars, which were 
also nearly cut ofT. Owing to the heat having 
consumed the packing there was no smoke to 
indicate a hot box from a distance. 

Superintendent Nichols has commended Mr. 
Reid for his timely action in reporting an 
unsafe condition. 

Operator W. B. Confer, second trick operator 
at Middletown, has been commeded for ob- 
serving a car that was not properly loaded, 
lumber protruding from the door. He caused 
the train to be stopped and the lumber was 
replaced. 

J. W. Burkam, operator at Columbus Grove, 
discovered defective equipment on extra 2416 
north on June 10. He notified the conductor 
on rear of train and it was stopped. This 
action on the part of operator Burkam is 
very commendable. 

"Sam" Borland, a brakeman on the Toledo 
Division, has been commended for discovering 
a defective rail west of Xenia. Mr. Borland 
entered the service of the Company in 1903 as 
freight brakeman and is now a passenger brake- 
man on trains Nos. 68 and 69 between Dayton, 
Ohio, and Chillicothe, Ohio. He is one of the 
most popular men on his line among the Com- 
pany's patrons. 

Newark Division 

On May 20 operator O. A. Rusler, while 
standing on station platform at Summit, noticed 
defective equipment on engine of passing train 
No. 133 and immediately notified train dis- 
patcher, with the result that train was stopped 
at following station and temporary repairs 
made to broken parts of engine before pro- 
ceeding. The alertness of Mr. Rus'er is com- 
mendable. 

On the night of May 18 A. R. McLaughlin, 
who operates a flour mill at Buffalo, Ohio, 
observed a horse on a bridge belonging to this 
Company and secured assistance in removing 
the animal. He has been written a letter of 
thanks by superintendent Stevens for the serv- 
ice rendered in this instance. 



V ^ 

1 i 

I When in Doubt, Remember "Safety First" ( 

I I 




AMONG OURSELVES 

niomirniimoirriiiHuiioiMUiiuinoiiiiiiMnnaiiiMiiiajiDiinniuiiioiiniiiiiiiioiiiirauraoninmmiDinniniiiiDmMiiinirainninim^ iiuiiiiimmiciimiiiiinoiiiiiijiuiiciii 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, John Limpert 

An unusually good time was enjoyed by the 
clerks of this office Saturday afternoon, June 8, 
at the Westport baseball grounds, when the 
cares of the office were cast aside. All kinds 
of games were provided, from running races to a 
ball game, and the only missing sport on the 
program was the greased pig, which, on 
account of the high cost of pork, was omitted. 
Thanks to the foresight of Messrs. Brauer and 
Spedden, the ladies were furnished with ice 
cream, cake and lemonade. Charles Faunt- 
leroy, our smiling porter, was on hand arrayed 
in a spick and span white uniform and dispensed 
the refreshments. 

Special mention should be made of the old 
style pie eating contest, participated in by four 
youngsters of the office, to the great delight of 
the onlookers. This event was decided in 
favor of Edward Kimball, who, when he had 
finished, was blackberry pie from ear to ear 
and chin to forehead. 

An unconfirmed rumor is being circulated 
that the winner of the potato race gathered up 
the potatoes and took them home with her. 
The ball game was a nip and tuck affair between 
the married and single men of the office and 
when play was called at the end of the ninth 
inning the score stood 13 to 13. Looks unlucky. 

The winners of the different races and prize 
drawing were: Rimning race for married men, 
A. H. Lehman; running race for single men, 
Frederick Svick; potato race for ladies, Miss 



Alice Ott; running race for ladies (married and 
single). Miss M. Kyle; pie eating contest, Ed- 
ward Kimball; and winner of 15.00 gold piece, 
Edward Link. 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, T. A. Kavanagh, Freight 
Agent, West 26th Street, N. R. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



W. B. Biggs Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. L. MiCHELSOX Terminal Cashier 

C. E. Floom Terminal Claim Agent 

J. J. Bayer Freight Agent, Pier 22, N. R. 

J. T. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

T. Kavanagh Freight Agent, 26th Street, N. R. 

T. F. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

M. F. Steinberger. . . .Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

J. E. Davis Freight Agent, St. George Transfer 

E. J. EIehoe Freight Agent, Pier 4, Wall about 

Marine Department Members 
E. A. English Marine Supervisor, Chairman 



C. H. Kearney.. As.sistant Marine Supervisor, Vice Chairman 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, J. V. Costello, Trainmaster^ 8 
Clerk, St. George 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanmne Chairman, Superintendent 

Miss Eva Runnow Secretary, Trainmaster's Clerk 

il. W. Ordeman Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Dr. F. Db Revere Medical Examiner 



59 



60 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 





\ - i 







SCENE AT FIELD DAY FOR COAL AND COKE AUDITOR'S OFFICE 



A. J. CoNLEY Road Foreman of Engines 

J. D. GiB3 Trainmaster 

J. F. McGowAN Division Operator 

E. R. Decker Division Agent 

W. J. Kenney Attorney 

C. A. Wilson Supervisor Crossing Watchmen 

Rotating Members 

W. Neiderhauser Towerman, Tower B 

J. B. Gerow Freight Conductor 

Guy Fetzer Painter 

W. Smith Locomotive Engineer 

J. Naples Locomotive Fireman 

W. A. Marshall Clerk to Agent, Tompkinsvilie 

G. J. Goolic Inspector 



Frank A. Zurmuhlen, per diem clerk in the 
Car Accountant's Department, has resigned to 
accept a position with a milk company at New 
Brighton. Frank is of the opinion that he can 
handle milk bottles better than a car record 
book. 

Miss Edith O'Mara, clerk in the Car Account- 
ant's Department, has been promoted to per 
diem clerk. 

S, A. Turvey, who onlered the service of the 
r. S. ( lovernrnent, has b(!en statioricd at Fort 
Slocum. "Sam," as he was familiarly known, 
was transferred to Company B, .51st Engineers, 
Camj) lielvoir, Virginia, and will go after the 
Kaisf;r within a few weeks. Good luck to 
"Sam." 

William Ci. Stark, mail clerk in tlie super- 
iiif (indent's office, has joiried the superinten- 
dent's force. He has made niany friends and 
is a very bright lad. 

The automobile travel over the Perth Amboy 
Ferry is very ln-nvy. 1 1 is nccesRary to opcralf; 



two boats on Saturdays and Sundays to take 
care of the travel to and from the seashore 
resorts. 

I. W. Titus, captain of the tug Narragansett, 
is enjoying his vacation motoring about the 
country. 

Captain H. Mclntyre has returned from a 
vacation and is in the best of health. 

J. T. Mullane, first trick tug dispatcher, has 
returned from a vacation trip around Staten 
Island. 

Captain E. McCune, night captain of tug 
J. K. Cowen, has returned from his vacation, 
which he spent up in the Catskill Mountains, 
planting his war garden. 

O. M. Jensen, bridge foreman and supply 
clerk, has returned from a two wrecks' vaca- 
tion. He visited Niagara Falls, Chicago and 
Washington. This is the first vacation "Larry" 
has had in twenty-two years. 

Miss Eva Runnow, stenographer in t he super- 
intendent's office, has been aj)pointed secretary 
of the divisional safety connnittee, vice S. A. 
Turvey, furloughed for U. S. service. She has 
also been aj)i)ointed secretary' of the freight 
claim prevention committee. 

Thomas Murray, inspector Maintenance of 
Way Department, is enjoying his vacation at 
Jled Bank, New Jersey. There must be some 
at traction at Bed Bank for "Tom" visits that 
place whenever there is an opportunity for him. 



Mrs. K. Purccll 
til ChiVelMnd, Olii 



IS enjoying 



'k's v;i('.;i t ion 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 



CLERKS AT GENERAL OFFICES— PHILADELPHIA 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondents 
J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 
J. C. Anderson, Shop Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent 

C. E. Owen Vicc-Chairman. Trainmaster 

T. Bloecher Division Engineer 

J. P. HiNES Master Mechanic 

.I.E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

H. K. Haktman Chief Train Dispatcher 

T. B. Franklin Terminal Agent 

J. N. GoDMAN Captain of Police 

F. H, Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

E. G. Owens Road Engineer 

W. E. Burns Road Fireman 

H. F. Lanb Road Conductor 

J. F. CoONEY Yard Conductor 

Wm. Tisdale Machine Shop Foreman 

R. F. MiNNicK Car Builder 

Felice Cori Section Foreman 

W. M. Devlin Secretary\ 

It must be inspiring to be engaged in railroad 
work with such a bevy of beauty around one as 
is indicated by the accompanying photograph, 
sent from the general offices at 24th and Chest- 
nut Streets, Philadelphia. There is only one 
other comparably delightful employment, and 
that is working with an equal number of Balti- 
more girls. They say the Philadelphia and the 
Baltimore girls are the most efficient and 
prettiest on the System. Somebody's going to 
challenge this and get the Editor into a con- 
troversy. 

On this page is a photograph of fire track 
foreman, Francesco Menna. He entered the 



service of the Comjjany in the latter part of 
1898 as a laborer on the Philadelphia Division, 
and has steadily risen to his present position. 
''Frank," as he is generally known by all who 
come in contact with him, is quite popular and 
is a very efficient and steady employe. 

C. C. F. Bent, general agent, Philadelphia, 
who has been ill for some time past, has 
recovered sufficiently to be about again and is 
now spending a few weeks at Atlantic City. 




FRANCESCO MENNA 



62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



W. J. Wilde, crew dispatcher, has taken the 
position of chief clerk to terminal trainmaster, 
East Side, Philadelphia. 

W. N. Brown, formerly freight solicitor, 
Philadelphia, has taken the position of car 
distributer, Philadelphia Division. 

Clarke Lonkhart, formerly assistant terminal 
trainmaster, has been appointed night terminal 
trainmaster. East Side, Philadelphia. 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B. Moriarity, Superin- 
tendent's Office, Caimden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

P. C. Allen Chairman, Superintendent 

W. E. Neilson Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Dep.\rtment 

T. E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secretary, Brunswick 

C. H. WiNSLOW Secretary, Washington 

Relief Department 

Dr. E. H. Mathers Medical Examiner, Baltimore 

Dr. J. A. RoBB Medical Examiner, Washington 

Dr. J. F. Ward .Medical Examiner, Winchester 

R. B. Banks Divisional Claim Agent, Baltimore 

J. M. Powell Captain oi Police, Camden Station 

Transportation Department 
S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick, Md. 

C. A. Mewshaw .Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. E. Hurlock Division Operator, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J. J. McCabe. .Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 
W. T. Moore Freight Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Freight Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Freight Agent, Brunswick 

W. E. Neil-sen Freight Agent, Camden Station 

J. L. Hawes Freight Conductor, Riverside 

W. T. Edgar Yard Conductor, Camden Yard 

C. W. McDaniels Passenger Fireman, Riverside 

J. W. Cavey Passenger Engineman, Riverside 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan General Foreman, Locust Point 

C. W. Selby Supervisor, Gaithersburg 

S. J. Lichliter Supervisor, Staunton, Va. 

W. O. Runkles Section Foreman, Brunswick 

C. Ritter Signal Repairman, Mt. Royal Station 

R. W. Mitchell Carpenter Foreman, Baltimore 

Motive Power Department 

T. F. Perki.nson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. WiLLUMSON General Car Foreman, Riverside 

T. O'Lkary Car Foreman, Washington 

W. C. Smith .Machinist, Brunswick 

('. B. BosiEN Machinist Apprentice, Riverside 

J. W. Peyton Leading Car In.spector, Brunswick 

G.N. Hammond Material Distributer, Locust Point 

We are pleased to see that our stationraastcr, 
J. H. Magce, is looking bo fine these days 
and is doing "his bit," as he has for a good 
many years. 

Occasionally letters are received from our 
dear friend Lieutenants-Colonel R. A. Grammes. 
In one of his recent letters he states that he 
will conic home with the bacon, or not, at all; 
th.-it ho will get, "Kaiser liill," r)r"K!ii,scr Hill" 



will get him. The longer the game keeps up 
the bigger piece of iDacon will Lieutenant 
Grammes bring home. And about "Kaiser 
Bill" getting him, well, we will just tell that to 
the Marines. 

Have you noticed that service button being 
worn by our wreckmaster "Tom" Kelly. Two 
stars — one son in the army and another in the 
navy. Mr. Kelly says he has another son who 
is figuring out which branch of the service to 
get in. 

On Wednesday, May 8, there passed away one 
of the best loved men on the Baltimore Division, 
our road foreman of engines, Edward Colmnbus 
Shipley. He was born at Martinsburg, W. Va., 
November 10, 1870, and entered the service 
August 1, 1890, as a fireman, and in turn became 
freight engineer and passenger engineer. He 
was appointed road foreman of engines, August 
2, 1911. As an engineer Mr. Shipley was known 
to be right up to the minute and was always a 
good partner to his fireman in the cab and many 
a fireman was assisted to their promotion by 
the guidance of engineer Shipley. His father, 
Monroe Shipley, was also an engineer, and for 
years handled the old 819 in passenger service 
on the east end of the Cumberland Division, 
running between Martinsburg and Cumberland. 
Among his men Mr. Shipley was loved and 
admired, and by his death the Baltimore 
Division lost a good and faithful employe, and 
a staff officer that neither hours or weather 
were considered in the performance of his duties. 




THE LATE E. C. SHIPLEY 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 




3 4 5 t 
9 10 U i2 t 
1« 17 18 19 2 
>32-V2526^ 
30 



FORMER TEMPORARY CASHIERS' OFFICE, WASHINGTON FREIGHT STATION 



A card has]been received from Major Walter 
V. Shipley, former passenger agent at Baltimore, 
announcing that he has "arrived safely abroad." 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, Secretary, 
Y. M. C. A. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

G. H. Winslow Chairman, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. James B. Grier. .Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 

Motive Power Department 
W. M. Grant Boiler Foreman 

H. A. Bright Gang Leader 

C.J Ayers Gang Leader 

A. F. Kreglow Storekeeper 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher 

N. Tippet Foreman, Car Shop 

H. A. Barefield Assistant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

J. J. Desmond Gang Leader 

G. Valentine Yard Engine Dispatcher 

B. Howard Assistant Foreman 

R. Heindrich Foreman, Station 

Transportation Department 

P. H. Deleplane Train Director 

L. T. Keant! Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 

Maintenance of Way Department 
W. M. Cardwell Master Carpenter 

F. W. Hodges Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

H. L. Bell Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

A. M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Richmond Signal Maintainer 

Letters coming from the railroad men in the 
army are interesting and inspiring. When one 



notes the earnestness with which they write, 
their eagerness to be at the front and their 
loyalty to the ideals of our government, there 
can be no doubt as to the outcome of the war. 
It is a well-known fact that the railroad men 
can fight. They will be in the front line when 
the march into Berlin takes place. But what 
about supporting them? Great effort is needed 
''over here" to put it across "over there." 
They will not lay down on the job, neither will 
we. Every man ought to remember that some 
one is in the front trench for him and show 
appreciation by seeing that that man does not 
lack for hearty cooperation and support. Buy 
War Savings Stamps, Liberty Bonds, pay taxes 
with a smile, give generously to the Y. M. C. A. 
War fund, the Knights of Columbus, Red Cross 
and other funds to make it easier for the man 
filling your place and keep him in good condi- 
tion to win. 

The railroad men subscribed liberally to the 
baseball and bat fund originated by Clark 
Griffith for soldiers, to help them enjoy the 
great American game and introduce it among 
men from other nations as a healthy, invig- 
orating, clean sport. 

The wedding announcement of H. D. Harton, 
of Nashville, Tenn., formerly in the superin- 
tendent's office, was received recently. Mr. 
Harton's many friends send congratulations 
and wish both Mr. and Mrs. Harton a happy 
and prosperous future. 

The Washington Terminal Women's Aux- 
iliary to the Red Cross was asked to partici- 



64 THE BALTIMORE AND 01 

pate in another ''drive," this time for the 
special effort of increasing sales of War Saving 
Stamps. They were assigned to the National 
Theatre during the time of the drive and had 
splendid success in obtaining pledges and cash 
for Uncle Sam in his great drive for the liberty 
of the world. 

The various Y. M. C. A. summer schools are 
placing special emphasis on the army work this 
year and the programs are made up with this 
in mind. 



Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting, Chief Clerk. 

We are now approaching what is usually con- 
sidered among railroad people as the "slack" 
period of the year, but in Washington, D. C, 
as well as in probably all other large freight 
stations, this so-called ''slack" period is in the 
dim and misty future. The rush and bustle of 
railroad life is affording us "stay-at-homes" an 
opportunity to do our share of the work of 
those of our number who have answered the 
call of Uncle Sam, and are already at the front, 
or are now on their way "over there;" and we 
are daily losing our young men, either through 
the draft or by- enlistment. 

W^e feel proud of our boys who leave us today 
wearing their civilian togs and in a short time 
come in to see us dressed in the "khaki" of 
Uncle Sam's fighters for liberty, and all we can 
do is to wish them good luck and a speedy 
return, crowned with victory and full of the 
knowledge that they have fought in the great 
cause and have overcome the forces of tyranny 
and oppression. In the meantime we have our 
part to do in the great struggle and it is for us to 
do our utmost to keep things moving over here 
for the sake of the boys "over there." The 
circular letter recently issued by superinten- 
dent P. C. Allen is full of splended thoughts and 
suggestions and if we do as Mr. Allen instructs 
us to (and we can, if we will) it will go far 
towards accomplishing the one great purpose 
that we all have in view, that is, to WIN THE 
WAR, and lick the detested Hun so thoroughly 
that he will have to acknowledge his defeat. 

A regretable typographical error in the June- 
July issue in this place made it appear that W. 
A. Keys, Jr., was a sailor on the "Cattleship" 
Kansas, United States Navy. It should have 
been Battleship Kansas. The Editor does not 
want to detract one bit from the glory attached 
to the enlistment of Mr. Kevs, but feels certain 
that if his nation assigned him to a cattleship 
he would serve just as faithfully as he is on the 
big fighting ship. 

The photograph on preceding page was taken 
in the year 1912, and recalls a bit of what is 
now "ancient history," when a train of cars 
got loose and found its way into our ofTic(; 
building. We had to us(; every available inch 
of space to liouso our oflice force, and the picture 



O EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 

shows the agent's private office turned into the 
cashier's department, with cashier W. Y, Stil- 
well on one side of the desk, and agent D. 
M. Fisher and assistant cashier J, H. Peak on 
the other side. This picture is of particular 
interest at this time as many changes have 
taken place in our office, making more room for 
everyone employed, the most important change 
being an entirely new private office for the 
agent, enabling him to transact the more impor- 
tant business in connection with the station 
without being interrupted by the noise and 
commotion that is always going on in well- 
regulated large railroad offices. 



Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, Miss Mildred L. Goetzinger 

Divisional Safety Committee 



L. FiNEGAN Chairman, Superintendent of Shops 

W. S. Eyerly Vice-Chairman, General Foreman 

M. L. Goetzinger Secretary, Secretary to Supt. of Shop.s 

H. A. Beaumont .General Car Foreman 

G. H. Kapinos Assistant General Foreman 

R. T. E. Bowler. . .Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

Dr. F. H. Digges Assistant Medical Examiner 

P. F. Wagner Shop Hand, Erecting Shop 

H. T. Stickell Boilermaker, Boiler Shop 

G. F. Kline Foreman, No. 3 Machine Shop 

and Steel Car Plant 

E. B. Bunting Machinist, No. 2 Machine Shop 

W. H. Robinson Pipe Fitter, Pipe and Tin Shop 

G. M. Kiser Moulder, Foundries and Re-rolling Mill 

J. T. Giles .Blacksmith, Blacksmith Shop 

G. ScHMALE Machine Operator, Bolt and Forge Shop 

W. P. May Machinist, Air Brake Shop 

C. Kessler Patternmaker, Pattern Shop 

S. H. Gainor Piecework Inspector, No. 1 Machine Shop 

T. U. Dover. . . Shop Hand, Tender and Tender Pain Shops 

H. Alker Shop Hand, Axle Shop and Power Plant 

T. M. Nichols Car Repairman, Freight Car Track 

J. E. Hull Car Builder, Passenger Car Erecting Shop 

W. E. Folks Upholsterer, Passenger Car Plant, 

Finishing and Upholstering Shops 

A. Selmeir Mill Machine Hand, Saw Mill 

and Cabinet Shops 

W. Banahan. Foreman, Stores Department 



The photograph on next page of cunning 
little Doris C. Hittel should make any parent 
envious of the joy that she must bring to the 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Hittel. 
She was three years old on July 1 last and was 
the honored guest at a birthday party at her 
home. Her father, a machinist at Mt. Clare, 
is very popular with his fellow employes and 
it seems that Doris inherits some of her charm 
from the paternal side of the domicile. Mr. 
Hittel is one of the most enthusiastic members 
of the Mt. Clare Welfare Association. 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
W. C. MoNTiGNANi, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
Laura E. Lingamfelter, Stenographer, Mainte- 
nance of Way Department 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



65 




DORIS C. HITTEL 



Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association 
of Cumberland, Md. 

President 

Griffin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Vice-Presidents 

F. F. Hani-ey Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Opeiator 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

A. J. Kelly General Yardmaster 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secretary 

C. W. Fries Chief Clerk to Division Accountant 

On this page is reproduced a photograph of 
Thomas K. Faherty, recentlj^ promoted to 
assistant superintendent, west end of the 
Cumberland Division. Mr. Faherty was born 
at Harper's Ferry, May 20, 1877, and entered 
the service of the Baltimore and Ohio, No- 
vember 3, 1897. He began his railroad career 
as a fireman and soon was promoted to the 
position of engineer. On March 1, 1908, he was 
appointed fuel inspector, and two years later 
was made road foreman of engines on the Cum- 
berland Division. A year later he was sent to 
the Monongah Division in the same capacity. 
He was promoted to the position o supervisor 
of locomotive operation of the West Virginia 
District on December 1, 1916. In 1 17 he went 
to the New Castle Division as road foreman of 
engines, and retained that position until his 
promotion as assistant superintendent of the 
west end of the Cumberland Division. 



Division Artist 

Mable R. Crawford, Tonnage Clerk, Division 
Accountant's Office 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Deneen Chairman, Superintendent 

T. K. Faherty Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welshoncb Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainmaster, East End 

L. J. WiLMOTH Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

W. T. Hughes Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

Dr. J. a. Dorner Medical Examiner 

Dr. J. H. Mayer Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

W. D. Strouse Joint Apent 

L. O. Miller Car Foreman, East End 

R. A. Tull Car Foreman, West End 

F. L. Leyh Storekeeper 

E. A. Workman Storekeeper 

Robert Childers Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

I. S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Tatlor Master Carpenter 

W. L, Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. MoNTiGNANi. .Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
M. E. MuLLiN. . .Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. C. Hauser Conductor 

F. Haddix Engineer 

H. H. Grimm Fireman 

J. D. Defibaugh Machinist 

C. W. Robinson Car Inspector 

F. B. Rathke Yard Brakeman 




THOMAS K. FAHERTY 



06 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




DON" KNIGHT AND SON 



Keyser 

A picture of Dominic Calemine and "Jim" 
Monceri is shown on this page. Dominic and 
*'Jim" were down to Baltimore seeing the sights 
and while there boarded a "warship" in a 
photograph gallery and had their pictures 
taken. Dominic is an injured hostler and is 
unable to follow his vocation, and "Jim" is a 
track foreman in charge of a section on the 
Cumberland Division. As their names indi- 
cate, they are Italians, but better Americans 
than they can't be found. Dominic imper- 
sonated Uncle Sam in a Red Cross parade here 
not long ago and made quite a hit and he was 
the happiest fellow in town. 

Sometime ago the Magazine contained an 
item about Harry B. Knight's new son. Here 
is a picture of him and his "pa" taken when 
he was six months old. What do you think of 
him for six months? 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 

E. S. Jknkins, Secrelnry to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

C. F. Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 



Hugh Wii>*on CLairrnan, Superintendent, (irafton 

li. Z. HoLVEKHTOTT AhhI. Superintendent, (Jrafton 

E. Baktlbtt Trainmaster, Fairmont 

John Niland Trainmaster, Grafton 

W. CJ. Dkeoan TrainmaHter, Weston 

.McC'luno Trainmaster, (Jrafton 



J. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Grafton 

C. E. Dotson Road Foreman, Grafton 

G. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton 

H. L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton 

J. O. Martin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg 

Dr. C. a. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton 

Dr. E. a. Fleetwood Medical Examiner, Clarksburg 

P. B. Phinney Agent, Grafton 

J. D. Anthony Agent, Fairmont 

S. H. Wells Agent, Clarksburg 

M. J. TiGHE Road Foreman of Engines, Fairmont 

P. D. Marsh Road Foreman of Engines, Weston 

J. P. Ryan Agent, Weston 

T. L. NuzuM Storekeeper, Grafton 

J. O. Whorley Engineer, Fairmont 

W. H. Kelly Machinist, Grafton 

C. C. Burgy Brakeman, Grafton 

E. E. Yerkey Conductor, Clarksburg 

J. W. Thornhill Leading Car Inspector, Fairmont 

L. V. Atha Conductor, Grafton 

E. L. Pendergast Machinst, Fairmont 

E. J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon 

W. E. Clayton Assistant Chief Clerk to Superintendent 



The West Virginia and Pittsburgh District 
have nine brakemen in the service in France. 

Weston has a service flag which will be erected 
shortly in the passenger station at Weston show- 
ing the number of employes who are now serv- 
ing the colors. A gold star will be placed in 
this flag to denote the death of Sergeant T. H. 
Wales. 

Fireman E. M. Arbogast has goue to Mount 
Clements to take a four-week treatment at the 
baths at that place. 

Master carpenter Hopke is now at Mount 
Clements for his health. 

W. C. Deegan, trainmaster at Weston, spent 
a week-end with his family at Wheeling, W. Va. 




DOMINIC CALEMINE (Riqht) 
"JIM" MONCERI 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



67 




MRS. MARY CHAPMAN 



James Copp is working as dispatcher at 
Weston in the absence of dispatcher Stafford, 
who is taking a much needed rest. 

A. P. Lavelle, the popular dispatcher at 
Grafton, has been indisposed for several days. 

Road foreman of engines P. D. Marsh has 
recovered from the burns which he received at 
Flemington while transferring gasoline. 

"Blackey" White, one of our genial engi- 
neers on the Baltimore and Ohio, has a nice 
little farm a few miles east of town. He says he 
is doing his bit to down the Germans. He is 
a member of the Red Cross, has purchased a 
bond, has planted twenty-one acres of corn and 
a large crop of potatoes that all look well, 
and he is pulling the throttle every day. 

C. R. Knight, of Grafton, is at Weston exam- 
ining the men on the new book of rules. 



Wheeling Division 

Correspondent, C. F. Miller, Office of 
Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. V. Smith Superintendent 

E. C. Wight Division Engineer 

F. C. ScHORNDORFER Master Mechanic 

C. M ALONE Trainmaster 

M. J. Walsh Road Foreman of Engines 

M. E. Cart-wright Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 



F. M. Garber Car Foreman 

Dr. D. L. Norris Medical Examiner 

H. H. Tederick Track Supervisor 

H. K. Reid Engineer 

G. E. Gatewood Conductor 

L. O. SwANN Fireman 

H. Parker Machinist Helper 

L. C. Nichols Brakeman 

J. R. Padden Secretary 

In April a plan was started to organize a 
Baltimore and Ohio Veterans' Association at 
this terminal. A meeting was called and ar- 



rangements were completed and on May 9 the 
organization was perfected. The veterans meet 
in the assembly room in the Baltimore and Ohio 
station building and organized with a member- 
ship of fifty-four and the following officers were 
elected: J. F. Shafferman, president; S. J. Linn, 
vice-president; F. H. Brumage, secretary, and 
J. D. Hecker, treasurer; H. G. Fletcher, W. H. 
Brown, G. W. Swisher, R. W. Burnup and O. C. 
Hull, executive committee. This association 
will hold regular meetings the first Thursday 
in each month at 7.30 p. m., and all veterans 
are invited to attend. 

Herewith is printed a photograph of Mrs. 
Mary Chapman, coach cleaner at Fairmont. 
She has been in the service for a year and is in 
a class all by herself when it comes to a woman 
doing a man's work. She can couple steam 
hose, test air brakes and make repairs and do 
any other work that is to be done on a passen- 
ger train. 

H. A. Woerner was appointed division engineer 
with headquarters at Wheeling, viceE. C. Wight, 
resigned. 



Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 
S. S. RouscH, Office of Superintendent 
Miss Helen Wright, Office of Division Engineer 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. W. Root Superintendent 

F. G. MoRAN Trainmaster 

J, G. KiRCHER Road Foreman of Engines 

O. J. Kelly Master Mechanic 

L. E. Haislip Division Engineer 

F. R. Davis Terminal Trainmaster 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

E. Chapman , Captain of Police 

F. A. Carpenter Agent, Parkersburg 

S. E. Eastburn Agent, Yardmaster, Huntington 

H. F. Owens Secretary 

Rotating Members 

P. M. Roe Engineer 

O. W. McCartt Fireman 

H. Neal Conductor 

M. F. Caldwell Brakeman 

A. C. Smith Car Department 

C. R. Tatlor Locomotive Department 

J. E. Rosier Stores Department 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, G. B. Gymer, Secretary to 
Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. B. Green Superintendent 

G. B. Gymer .Secretary 

J.J. Powers Trainmaster 



68 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



W. J. Head Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

G. R. Galloway Master Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. H. Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A. J. Bell Terminal Agent 

Dr. A. A. Church ' Medical Examiner 

G. J. Maisch Claim Agent 

M. E. TuTTLE Division Operator 

Rotating Members ; to serve six months) 

J. Hickman Relief Agent, Cleveland 

F. E. Weeks Dispatcher, Cleveland 

P. EsposiTO Section Foreman, Akron 

T. Ridley Carpenter Foreman, Canton 

D. Robinson Brakeman, I^orain 

W. L. Cutter Engineer, Lorain 

E. C. Haviland Engineer, Cleveland 

N. WiLBOis Conductor, Akron 

J. F. Hert Conductor, Cleveland 

J. J. Hurley Enginehouse Foremar, Cleveland 

V. Lucas Steel Car Foreman, Lorain 



Harrison Z. T. Lynch, affectionately called 
"Dad," died at his home in Cleveland June 14, 
aged sixty-six years, after an illness of sev- 
eral months. "Dad" was one of the oldest 
engineers on the Cleveland Division, having 
entered the service as freight engineer De- 
cember 2, 188L Before entering service of this 
Company, he helped build the Black River and 
Tuscarawas Valley Railroad, now the Lorain 
Branch of this division, and ran the first train 
between Lorain and Bridgeport. He was very 
proud of his thirty-seven years' service without 
a "black" mark against him. On January 21, 
1913, he was presented an inscribed oil can by 
the management in recognition of the care he 
took of his engine. Our sympathies are ex- 
tended to the family. 

We are pleased to advise the many friends of 
conductor C. C. Craig, that he is rapidly re- 




•MOE" CLINE (Left) AND "TOMMY" DIXON 



covering from a recent operation and hopes 
soon to resume his run. Mr. Craig is the 
oldest conductor in service on this division. 
May he add many more miles to his credit. 

H. D. Evans, better known as "Hank" Evans 
around Cleveland, has again returned to Balti- 
more to perform service in office of general 
superintendent of transportation. 

J. G. Collinson, former assistant division 
engineer on this division, has resigned to accept 
service with a tire company at Akron, Ohio. 

J. P. Cooper, former clerk in freight office at 
Elyria, Ohio, has been appointed relief agent, 
vice H. T. Williams, resigned. 

Lowell H. Eddj^ former engineer on the 
"Lorain Plug," has been pensioned after forty- 
five years of continuous service, having entered 
the service on November 15, 1872, as fireman, 
w^as promoted to passenger engineer in 1880 
and has been on the right side of the cab ever 
since. Lowell is only sixty-six years "young" 
and his happy smile assures us that he intends 
to enjoy the fishing trips on his merited vaca- 
tion. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark 

J. P. Dorse Y Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Newark 

C. R. DiEMAR Division Engineer, Newark 

R. A, Vernon Road Foreman of Engines, Newark 

W. D. Johnston Master Mechanic, Newark 

A. R. Claytor Division Claim Ae;ent, Newark 




WOODIE AND WOODIiOW 
LTwin Sons of J. O. Quigley 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



69 




TRACK FOREMAN JURENO AND GANG, NEWARK YARD 



D. J. Host T. M. & C. T. D., Columbus 

C. D. Miller Shopman, Newark 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner, Newark 

F. Backenstos Conductor, Newark 

W. H. RissLER Fireman, Newark 

L. C. Decker Engineer, Newark 

O. A. Collins Car Repairer, Newark 

F. Strear Blacksmith, Newark 

D. E. Shock Yard Conductor, Newark 

The friends of Jeremiah Donahoe, retired 
general yardmaster, were grieved to learn of 
his death at Columbus on May 16 from pneu- 
monia after an illness of one week. Mr. 
Donahoe was born February 17, 1855, and first 
entered the service of the Baltimore and Ohio 
July 1, 1878 as a brakeman. He was promoted 
to conductor the following year and held this 
position until October, 1898, when he was 
selected as general yardmaster at Columbus. 
He was married at Columbus to Miss Ellen 
O'Neill, February 15, 1881. Mrs. Donahue 
died April 30, sixteen days before her husband. 
They are survived by two sons and three 
daughters. Mr. Donahue spent his entire life 
in Columbus and was well known in that city 
and by the employes of the Newark Division 
generally, who extend sympathy to the family. 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Superintendent, Connells- 
ville 

S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 
Connellsville 

C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Assistant Superinten- 
dent, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

M. H. Broughton Chairman. Superintendent 

CM. Stone Assistant Superintendent 

A. E. McVicker Trainmaster 

A. P. Williams Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 



Dr. F. H. Weidemann Medical Examiner 

G. M. Tipton Freight Agent 

W. G. Carter Freight Agent 

C. A. Albright Freight Agent 

H. B. PiGMAN Division Operator 

F. T. Robinson Engineer 

A. G. Watson Fireman 

J. E. Leckemby Conductor 

J. T. Deneen ; Brakeman 

H. T. Robinson Machinist 

J. G. Percy Boilermaker 

S. M. May Road Foreman of Engines 

J. S. GiLMORE Trainmaster 

J. J. Ryland Secretary 

Injuries sustained two months ago, and 
double pneumonia, resulted in the death of 
Walter J. Adams, fifty years old, engineer on 
the Baltimore and Ohio wreck train for about 




THE LATE WALTER J. ADAMS 



70 THE BALTIMORE AND O 

thirty-five years, at his home, 1203 Sycamore 
Street, Comiellsville. Mr. Adams was injured 
when another train bumped into his, causing a 
stove to overturn in one of the wooden coaches. 
He was the last man to leave the train. Mr. 
Adams was born at Timnelton, Preston County, 
W. Va., a son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Adams. 
At the ace of eleven years he came to Connells- 
ville with his parents, residinc: here since. He 
entered the service of the Baltimore and Ohio 
railroad thirty-eight years ago and was widely 
and favorably known in railroad circles. He 
was a member of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Veterans' Association, the Yough Tent I^ights 
of Maccabees and the Immaculate Conception 
Church. He served on the old borough council 
in 1906 and was a member of the old Friendship 
Hose Company No. 1 of Connellsville. Nine- 
teen years ago last November he was married 
to Miss Katherine Moore, of Oil City, who, 
with the following children, survives: Misses 
Cornelia, Mary, Jeannette and Evangelist, and 
Robert Adams, all at home. Four sisters, Mrs. 
Katherine King, Mrs. Ann Costello, Mrs. Julia 
Nee, all of Connellsville; Sister Veronica, of the 
Holy Angels' College, New York, and two 
brothers, P. J. Adams, of Connellsville, and 
Michael Adams, of Homestead, also survive. 



Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondent, C. J. Kessler, Car Accountant's 
Office, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. J. Brady Chairman, Superintendent 

T. W. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

J. M. MxjEHLBAUER Secretary 

H. H. Marsh Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

R. H. Stout Superintendent of Shops 

A. J. Weise General Car Foreman 

F. Bryne Claim Clerk 

W. F. Deneke Terminal Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. a. J. BossYNS Medical Examiner 

G. S. Dietz Brakeman 



"Joe" Kennedy of our division arrived safely 
in France. He is attached to an Engineers' 
regiment. 

"Harp" Ryan was one of the same party to 
land safely on the other side. 

H. A. Dietz, employed as statistical clerk in 
the D. S. M. of P. office, has left to join the colors. 
He is driving the horses for Uncle Sam. We 
wish him the world of luck. 

".Jeff" Haney has arrived safely "over there" 
with a regiment of engineers. These boys arc 
going to show the folks on the other side how 
"our own" roads on this side are manipulated. 
They are going to build the main line from tlie 
French front to Herlin. And believe us of the 
Pittsburgh Division, they are the boys that will 
show the Huns up. Good luck to these boys. 

Charles Schwvert, Thomas Cavil lo, Irwin A. 
Miller, If. ]\. riunsenschler, H. .1. Halkey, 



:0 EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 

Frank Dudson, Earl Seatz, Thomas Curran, 
Frank Dehn, Oscar Newhousen and Hugh 
Neeman have enlisted in the flying corps. 

A. P. Berg has been appointed terminal road 
foreman of engines, with headquarters at Glen- 
wood. We all wish "Al" very much success in 
his new position. 

W. JL Linsenbigler, car foreman, has been 
absent from his office for about six months 
because of sickness. Mr. Linsenbigler has been 
with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad since 
July 1, 1883. 

George Rush, assistant yardmaster at Demm- 
ler. Pa., left June 21 for Baltimore to spend 
a fifteen-day vacation. 

G. L. Fisher, chief clerk to yardmaster, 
Demmler, Pa., was named extra assistant 
yardmaster. 

We have been pleased to learn of O. P. 
Dom being promoted to night chief joint car 
inspector at Dexter, Pa., between Baltimore 
and Ohio and Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Rail- 
roads. Mr. Dom has been with the Baltimore 
and Ohio since August 17, 1899. 

We were sorry to hear that our freight house 
at Braddock burnt to the ground on May 2. 
The wreckage has been cleaned up, and our 
new freight house is now under construction. 

Albert Suckling, clerk to assistant superinten- 
dent of terminals, has resigned to accept a 
position with the Pittsburgh Railways Co. 

Robert MacBeth, yard clerk at Versailles, is 
making plans and preparations to accompany 
W. L. Douglass, his father-in-law, to a camp 
meeting in August. 

Conductor Rahsick and family have returned 
from a two weeks' vacation spent in Ohio. 
Charles reports having a good time. 

The Pittsburgh Division subscribed $285,550 
for the third Liberty Loan campaign. 



New Castle Division 

Correspondents 
W. W. McGaughey, Chief Clerk to Superintendent 
C. S. Maynard, Operator, Chardon, Ohio 
V. P. McLaughlin, Operator, BD Tower, Akron 
Junction, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



C. W. VanIIorn Chairman, Superintendent 

C. 1*. Anoei.l Vice-Chairman, Trainina.stcr 

D. W. CnoNiN Divi.sion Kngineer 

A. II. Hodges Master Mechanic 

James Aiken Agent. YounRfstown, O. 

I)u. F. Dorse Y Medical Examiner 

C G.Osborne Claim Agent 

F. H. Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Camill Division Operator 

W. Dam RON Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Ma.ster Carpenter 

J.J. FisHBURN Secretary 

\]. J. Hunt Hoad Conductor, New Ca.stle Junction 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 



G. C. Anderson Road Fireman, New Castle Junction 

S. O. Lewis Road Engineer, New Castle Junction 

N. Thatcher Machinist, New Castle Junction 

G. H. Glenn Yard Engineer, Haselton, O. 

F. D. Lancaster Yard Conductor, Painesville, O. 

Miss E. R. Biggerstaff Clerk, New Castle Junction 

Miss Pearl D. Clark.. Chief Clerk to Agent, Youngstown, O. 

The news of the death of Dennis W. Cronin 
came as a decided shock to a larjre number of 
employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
Company, particularly on the New Castle Divi- 
sion, where he had been employed as division 
engineer. A fire, originating in the Cronin 
residence at Youngstown, Ohio, was discovered 
by him. He went to the third floor to deter- 
mine if his son was still in the building. It is 
apparent that during his search he was over- 
come by smoke. Mr. Cronin was born Septem- 
ber 11, 1863, and entered the service of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company De- 
cember 1, 1889. He was first employed as 
laborer and his ability and energy won for him 
successive promotions as foreman, supervisor, 
general supervisor, maintenance inspector on 
the staff of engineer maintenance of way, event- 
ually division engineer of the New Castle 
Division, which position he held at the time of 
his death. He had resided with his family in 
Cumberland for a number of years and had just 
recently moved to Youngstown. 

He was ambitious and conscientious in his 
work and made for himself a high reputation 
in track maintenance work and it was in this 
particular feature of railroad work that his 
ability won for him the recognition that re- 
sulted in carrying him into positions of greater 
responsibility. The body of Mr. Cronin was 
taken to Cincinnati, Ohio, on Wednesday, June 
19, and a special delegation of staff officials 
from the New Castle Division was assigned to 
accompany the family to that point. The 
funeral services were held Thursday, June 20, 
in the Church of the Atonement, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

O. C. Bedell, of Newton Falls, assistant ex- 
aminer on book of rules, called upon the opera- 
tors of New Castle Division commencing 
June 1. 

The home of operator H. Hull of Akron 
Junction was burglarized June 8, the thieves 
taking $145. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, O. V. Kincade, Assistant Chief 
Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. H. Jackson Chairman, Superintendent, Gareett, Ind. 

T.J. Rogers Vice-President, Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

T. E. Jamison Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

John Tordella Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111. 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind. 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

W. F. MoRAN Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

D. Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

J. E. Fisher Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 



Dr. W. a. Funk Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

Dr. C. W. Hedrick Medical Examiner, Willard, O. 

J. D. Jack Claim Agent, Garrett, Ind. 

J. F. MiLBURN Act. Sec'y. Y. M. C. A., Willard, O. 

John Draper Agent, Chicago, 111. 

W. P. Allman Agent, Avilla, Ind, 

H. C. Baretta Engineer 

W. J. Wisenbaugh Fireman 

C. B. Maxwell Conductor 

A. C. Smith Brakeman 

S. R. Yingling Machinist 



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A book for hustling Real Estate 
boosters, promoters, town builders and 
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in Real Estate "Pointers," Specific Legal 
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The New 1916 Edition contains The 
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The A. B. C.'s of Realty. 

Workmen's Compensation Act, In- 
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Baltimore and Ohio Employes Magazine, Baltimore, Md. 




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72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



W. G. Mehl Machiniat 

J. N. Davis Machinist 

C. F. Wessel Car Inspector 

H. J. Blake Air Brake Repairman 

C. D. Bergstresser Yard Brakeman 

The monthly meeting of the Chicago divi- 
sional freight claim prevention committee was 
held at The Inn, Wawasee, Ind., on Tuesday, 
June 18, division freight agent J. W. Melone 
presiding in the absence of the chairman, T. J. 
Rogers, who was unable to attend account of 
having been called away from the city on that 
date. The exceptional good attendance at this 
meeting was gratifying, the agencies of the 
division being well represented, and the enthu- 
siasm with which the various subjects were 
discussed is evidence of the interest that is 
being taken in the freight claim campaign. 
The committee is confident of most satisfactory 
results. 

Mrs. J. W. Melone and Mrs. W. R. McKee 
accompanied division freight agent Melone and 
commercial representative McKee to Lake 
Waw^asee, Tuesday, June 18. 

Flag day, June 14, was appropriately cele- 
brated at Garrett by employes of the Chicago 
Division, by the raising of a new flag at the sta- 
tion grounds. The Rev. Frederick M. Newlin 
presided and talks were made by Mayor 
Clevenger, Frederick L. Feick and Finley A. 
Nash. The Boy Scouts and Camp fire Girls 
attended in a body. Music was furnished by 
the Garrett Military Band. 

L. Louis Plummer, formerly employed as 
stenographer to car distributer, Garrett, is 
spending a few days' furlough with friends in 
Garrett. Guess "Louie" finds fishing good at 
Garrett. 

On Wednesday evening, June 12, special 
representative W. W. Wood gave a lecture in 
the Eagles' Hall, Garrett, on the subject "Pull 
Together for Victory." This is Mr. Wood's 
third address in Garrett. 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

Flag day was observed at this station during 
the noon hour with outdoor exercises, general 
foreman Quigley managing the afTair and using 
the now platform near storekeeper Kazmerek's 
office as the speaker's stand. Our * 'P'our Minute 
Men" from tne mechanical department and the 
offices wore on hand and gave some very good 
talks. General car foreman E. Mattingly intro- 
duced the Hi)eakers and explained to the foreign 
born employes the reason we wore celebrating 
the event. He very fitfully remarked that in 
the absence of a bugh^r the Baltimore and Ohio 
engine whistles had answered that purpose, 
of which fact wo wore all well aware. The 
"Star-Spanglod BaniKir" was sung by the audi- 
ence while Miss Erickson, sionograi)hcr, assist ed 
in raising the flag. 'I'horrjas Berry, a veteran at 
the shops, niado an address, stating that the 



stars and stripes are a protection of all that is 
dear to us. He spoke on what our boys are 
doing "over there" and expressed a hope that 
they might dine in Berlin on Christmas. 

Agent Altherr and trainmaster Huggins 
followed, pajdng a fine tribute to the fiag and 
praising the employes for the manner in which 
they had responded to the difTerent calls for 
help and entreated all to do everything possible 
in the working hours toward winning the war. 
"America" was sung at the close and much 
credit is due to chief clerk J. Hufton, cashier 
A. E. Pollard, and Miss Florence Cameron 
for the splendid assistance given in the singing. 

Special representative Woods' illustrated 
lecture at the shops on June 11 was very much 
appreciated by those who were present. 

The following employes from South Chicago 
have entered military service this month: 
E. A. Allen, L. Staszewski, T. Glon, C. E. 
Shannon, C. E. Winquist, J. P. Doney and E. 
H. Krutch. 

Miss lone Sack, record clerk, spent her 
vacation in Washington. 

Miss Ethel Clark, utility clerk,_has returned 
to her desk after a pleasant vacation. 

Chief clerk O. E. Anderson, of general fore- 
man Quigley's office, has returned from a fishing 
trip with the usual stories which follow this 
recreation. We propose, however, to have 
these accounts verified by Mrs. Anderson before 
sending them in for publication. 

Car foreman Kleist spent his vacation in 
Cincinnati. 

We acknowledge a very pleasant call from 
car distributer William Pollard and Mrs. 
Pollard of Garrett, Ind., recently. 



Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, W. E. Buckmaster, Chief Etec- 
trician, Lincoln Street, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. L. Nichols Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster, Chicago 

C. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Building 

R. L. Faithorn Assistant Engineer, Building 

A. Chaw Division Claim Agent, Building 

A. R. Osborne Captain of Police, Building 

C. L. Hegley Examiner, Building 

H. McDonald Supervisor, Building 

Wm. Hooan Supervisor, Building 

F. K. Moses Ma.ster Mechanic 

F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines, Koboy Street 

Chas. Esping Master Carpenter, Building 

Dr. E. J. Hughes Medical Examiner, Building 

C. O. SiEFERT Signal Supervisor, Building 

E. J. BoYLB Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

Edw. Mattingly General Car Foreman 

D. M. Julian Car Foreman, Chicago 

Ray Elder Car Foreman, East Chicago 

R. James Engine Foreman, Blue Island 

T. FiNNON Helper, East Chicjigo 

W. A. Welsh Engine Foreman, Robey 

I). Flynn Locomotive Engineer, Eiust Chicago 

J. GouLDiNQ Locomotive Engineer, lilue Island 

John Latshaw Locomotive Engineer, Robey Street 

J. C^RAWKORD Machinist, Robey Street 

Wm. Schmel Machinist Apprentice, East Chicago 

G. Pappblo Boilermaker, Robey Street 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 



The Baltimore and Ohio Chica^ro Terminal 
has sent its men as well as its dollars to help 
win the war. At last reports the men had 
jriven more than $110,000 to Liberty bonds. 
Here is a list of men who have donned service 
uniforms : 

B. R. Howard, J. J. Hayes, H. I. Driscoll, 
B. Fowler, J. B. Broderick, E. J. Doherty, 
Frank Bastl, Samuel Caplan, Arthur Vogel- 
sanger, John Hrunek, T. C. Sheely, H. C. 
Schulz, William Blaha, John Lindow, E. S. 
Pearson. Laugman Paul, Alexander Lukus, 
Charles Satterthwaite, M. O'Keefe, Thomas 
Condon, Edward Duffy, C. Sciano, C. Merk, 
James Browne, Thomas Carey, J. Mulryan, 
Micheal Maye, Ray Doney, T. J. Slater, Wil- 
liam Mensch, M. Fleming, Daniel Galvin. 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Operator, DO 
Office, Chillicothe, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. W. Hoffman Chairman, Superintendent 

R. Mallon Trainmaster 

J. M. Mendell Road Foreman of Engines 

W. F. Hayes Master Mechanic 

A. H. Freygang Division Engineer 

J. G. Selby Medical Examiner 

E, Cole Supervisor 

G. E VVharff Agent, Portsmouth, O. 

T. J. DuNKLE Conductor 

E. W. Foster Brakeman 

C. Deininger Engineer 

C. N. Varian. . Fireman 

H. M. Cunningham Yard Conductor 

W. F. Ottman Painter Foreman 

G. H. Medert Machinist 




JOHN C. MOREY 

highly commended 
for the neatness cf 
the tower and the 
entire plant. Their 
plant is the envy of 
the whole division. 
They're a nifty look- 
ing pair of men. 

"Dick" Heilman, 
station baggagemas- 
ter at Chillicothe, 
relates an interesting 
•experience he had in 
handling the bag- 
.gage of an old colore d 



Don't think you 
have to have a dirty 
office or shop or 
tower just because 
the locomotives 
which pass send 
forth a lot of dirt and 
soot. J. C. Morey 
and D. McKinney, 
levermen at the in- 
terlocking tower at 
Sabina, have found 
a sure panacea for it. 
Their pictures are 
printed on this page 
and they have been 




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It is our purpose to offer only such things as will 
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All advertising will be rigidly examined before inser- 
tion so that there may be no question about its stand- 
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ADVERTISING RATES 

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74 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




CHILLICOTHE WRECKING CREW AND CRANE 
Those in the picture, right to left, are: S. R. Walden, Wreckmaster; George Churchheus, Assistant Wreclf- 
master; D. W. Betts, Engineer; Edward Titler, Fireman; B. Carrigan, Wreckman; H. D. Carnes, Wreckman; 
J. W. Jewel, Groundman; J. Langley, Checker; F. Castleman, Cook. 



preacher, Rev. David S. Cincore, who reads 
Othello by heart at seventy years. His trunk 
arrived at Chillicothe some time last March 
and he lost the duplicate check. He reclaimed 
the trunk by identifying]; the contents. The 
matter was lost sight of, the duplicate check 
was forgotten, when ''Dick" received the fol- 
lowing letter, which is produced here intact 
and speaks for itself. 

Springfield, Ohio, June 17, 1918. 
To THE Baggagemaster, 

Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Good Sir: 

I pull off my boots today and taken out 
the inside sole. Found this check (No. 
33-35-27), which I cannot account for, it 
may belong to your office as I my baggage. 

God bless you, 

Rev. David S. Cincore. 

O. S. Ray, formerly third trick operator at 
Dundas, who joined the colors some months 
a'lo, was commissioned second lieutenant at 
the Officers' Training Camp, Leon Sprin^rs, 
Texas. We expected it. You can't keep the 
Ohio Division boys back. Ovid has worked 
hard and we congratulate him. 

The division operator's monthly bulletin 
shows the following appointments, as per 
May bulletin: Harpers, agent-operator, W. H. 
(iraves; Dundas, second operator, S. C. Good- 
rich. 

A total of fourteen men in this department, 
Ohio Division, have been called to the colors. 

The correspondent wishes to tliank those 
who have contributed items and suggestions 
for items for the Employes Magazine from this 
division, and for encouragement and coopera- 
tion of others in this work. With the same 



encouragement and help of the employes over 
the entire division we cannot help but be well 
represented in these columns each month and 
this is what we are out to do. Come on, bo\'s, 
with your items and photographs. 

Flag day, June 14, was observed on the Ohio 
Division by our local officials and several hun- 
dred employes gathered at the flag pole at the 
passenger station at Chillicothe and hoisted a 
new flag to the top of the pole. Senator Dick 
gave a very interesting talk. A. H. Freygang, 
division engineer, acted as master of cere- 
monies. The reciting of the pledge of alle- 
giance and the American's creed, being led 
by the master of ceremonies, who also acted as 
musical director for the singing of the "Star- 
Spangled Banner" and "America" by all of the 
employes, accompanied by an orchestra from 
the shops. 



Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



A. A. Iams Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. B. Purkhiser Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

H. S. Smith Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

C. E. Heuth Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

J. M. Shay Master Mechanic, Cincinnati, O. 

S. A. RooERS Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind. 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind. 

P. T. HoRAN General Foreman, Seymour, Ind. 

E. Massman Agent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Sands Agent, Louisville, Ky. 

J. E. O'DoM Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O. 

F. O. BuNTON Secretary, Seymour, Ind. 

Rotating Members 

V. L. DowELL Fireman, Seymour, Ind. 

W. F. Clause Conductor, Seymour, Ind. 

.loE Stewart Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

L. D. Harrinqton Section Foreman, Blocher, Ind. 



John Gault, section foreman at Delaware, 
Ind., died suddenly at his home, June 2. He 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



75 



had been ill for some time, but attended faith- 
fully to his duties up until two days before his 
death. Mr. Gault was born March 1, 1852. 
He entered the service of this Company as 
trackman at Nebraska, Ind., May 1, 1876. 
On March 1, 1893, he was promoted to foreman 
at Pierceville, Ind., and on May 1, 1903, his 
headquarters was changed to Delaware, on 
the same section, where he resided until his 
death. He was one of the best track foremen 
on the Baltimore and Ohio System, and was 
well liked by his men and commanded the 
respect and confidence of his superiors. In 
the year 1917, Mr. Gault w^on the prize for 
having the best maintained main line section 
on the Indiana Division. He is survived by 
his wife and daughter, at home, and a son in 
France. 

H. S. Adams, chief clerk to superintendent, 
is spending two weeks' vacation with his father 
at his old home near Covington, Ky. 

Two of the operators at JO office are finding 
it quite difficult to throttle their high-speed 
motorcycles down to comply with the speed 
restrictions through the streets of Seymour. 
They seem to be playing hide and seek with the 
police. 

The superintendent's office is getting a new 
coat of paint this week and the place is certainly 
a more cheerful one to be in at this time wath 
its new dress on. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, W. F. Cochrane, Chief Clerk 
to Supervisor of Terminals 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. T. Horn Chairman, Supervisor of Transportation 

J. H. Meyers Trainmaster 

J. M. Mendell Road Foreman of Engines 

L. A. CoRDiE Assistant Terminal Agent 

Dr. G. R. Garver Medical Examiner 

J^M. Burke Car Foreman 

H. P. HoGAN General Foreman 

G. A. Bowers General Foreman 

T. Mahoney Supervisor 

.Rotating Members 
HoTTEL Machinist 

H. W. KiRBERT Engineer 

C. R. DooLiTTLE '.'.'. Yardmaster 

$5- I^^^JDLE Inbound Foreman 

R. H. Searls Claim Clerk 

On July 1, employes at Storrs repair track, 
with those at the roundhouse, held a patriotic 
meeting and flag raising. A service flag in 
honor of James Harris, A. B. Simms, Walter 
Hackett, Daymon Simpson and Horace Krone, 
who have entered the service of the United 
States, was raised. 

J. M. Burke, car foreman at Storrs, recently 
entertained his ofl^ce force at his home. All 
present had a very enjoyable day. 

K. Heidel, machinist, is the proudest man at 
Ivorydale. A baby girl arrived at his home 
last week. Cigars were in abundance. 

Benjamin Beck, of Elmwood billing office, 
announced his marriage to Miss Erie McCabe 
on June 24. It is difficult to say who got the 
biggest surprise: Beck or his co-workers. 




WristWatch 



TTHE day of the wrist watch is 

^ here! A wrist watch is part of every 
officer's equipment in the European 
armies. Practically every officer in the U. S, 
army wears one. It has been proven the moht 
convenient tvatch in the uorld. 

And here is the Aviator's model. This 
New Burlington was built for aviators and is 
adjusted to keep time to the second anywhere. 
Fully jeweled— finest nickel movement. Square design. 
Clear, distinct, military dial. Extra heavy hands. 
Buckles with sturdy pig skin strap that cannot slip. Send 
coupon today for beautifully illustrated catalog. 

Radium Dial ' furnish this watch 

_ • with radium dinl when de- 

sired using only the highest grade radiiim. The same as 
is used on the very best scientific instruments. We know 
positively that thisquality of radium willnot lose its lumi- 
nosity for many years, in fact we believe it will last a life- 
time. Althoueh we can't claim this definitely as radium 
has been discovered only a comparatively short time. 



The Burlington 

$2— a Month 

Yes,— all of this for $2.50— only $2.50 
a month for this masterpiece of watch manufacture. 
Now sold direct to you at positively the exact price 
that the wholesale dealer would have to pay. 

Write for FREE Book showing th". latent 
designs in our New Regular Model Watch. 

Send the Coupon ^™ _ 

for Watch Book Burlington Watch 

^ Company 

/ 

Burlington Watch Company M 

Dept. B743 W 

^ N, 



Get the Burlington Watch Book 
by sending this coupon now, 
You will know a lot more about 
watch buyingr when you read it 
You will know why aman who haa 
become accustomed to the con- 
of a V r i s t wateh 



19tb and MarshaU Blvd. 
Dept. B743 Chicago, Illinois- 
Please send me (without 
obligations and prepaid) your 



explanation of your cash or 
$2.50 a month offer on the Bur- 
liiigion V> atch. 



Jept. B743 
19th and Marshall 

Boulevard, 
Chicago, Illinois 



Address.. 



76 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The new machine shop has been completed 
and is now in full operation. 

A. E. Boyle, employed at Stock Yards as car 
repairer, was drafted and sent to British 
Columbia, whence he will be sent ''over there" 
as car inspector. 

C. D. Swepston answers the call to the colors 
and his vacancy causes the promotion of a 
number of clerks. 

Storrs shop boasts of 100 per cent, in 
Liberty Loan and Red Cross gifts, and expects 
to do the same in the Thrift Stamp campaign. 

P. Marsland, laborer foreman, has been in 
the hospital for the past three weeks. We hope 
to have him with us soon again. 

D. P. Corey, recently employed in the super- 
visor of terminal's office, resigned to enter 
service with the Carborundum Company, Cin- 
cinnati. 

William J. Maloney, formerly chief clerk, who 
was with the Company for a number of years, 
has been furloughed for government service. 
He will hurry cars through the terminal. 

J. M. Kelly, recently of Parkersburg, has 
accepted a position as night chief clerk in office 
of supervisor of terminals. 

E. T. Haas, general foreman at Ivorydale, 
is on his vacation. He is taking a trip through 
the northwest and will inspect shops and 
engine houses. 

P. Haaf, airbrake foreman at Ivorydale, 
while on vacation in New York spent two days 
in the Tombs, Maxwell Island. He forgot to 
take his registration card with him. He ad- 
vises that all who are contemplating leaving 
town not to fail to take their registration cards 
with them. 

Two of the local office boys now in France are 
R. H. Rudig, former assistant rate clerk, now 
corporal in a regiment of Engineers, and 
Waldo C. Skinner, son of agent E. C. Skinner. 
Their recent letters were full of "pep" and 
indicated their good health and spirits. 

John E. Bell, formerly yard clerk at Brighton, 
left a few days ago for the east, having enlisted 
in the U. S. Marines. We are mighty proud of 
the action taken by John. To show the appre- 
ciation, his fellow employes gave him a fine 
wrist watch the day he was leaving. John is 
.so patriotic that the last day of his service he 
arranged to have all back pay due him con- 
verted into Liberty Jionds and mailed to his 
mot her. 

J. J. Mitchf;!!, formerly chief yard cl(;rk at 
Stock Yards, also has joined the Marines. 
Before leaving he was presented a shaving out- 
fit by his fellow employes. 



Illinois Division 

Correspondents 
Walter S. Hopkins, Chief. Clerk to Division 

Accountant, Flora, 111. 
Omer T. Goff, Secretary to Superintendent. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. G. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent 

Omer T. Goff Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

J. W. Odum Trainmaster 

R. E. Chamberlain Division Engineer 

W. F. Harris Master Mechanic 

C. H. Creager Road Foreman 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator 

H. E. Orr Master Carpenter 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor 

M. F. Wyatt Supervisor 

G. H. Singer Agent, East St. Louis 

C. S. Mitchell Agent, Flora, 111. 

Rotating Members 

W. H. Mullen Engineer 

Paul Naney Fireman 

CO. Davis Conductor 

J. E. BuRRis Brakeman 

H. C. Smith Machinist 

George Quayle Machine Maa 

Frank O'Shatz Car Inspector 

Ed Widdows Track Foreman 

Chief dispatcher C. F. White has just re- 
turned from a much-needed rest, having spent 
his time while away in his automobile. 
''Sandy" says the landscape around Flora is 
beautiful and this is the first opportunity he 
has had to see it for several years. 

O. T. Goff, secretary to superintendent, 
announces that he is starting on his vacation. 
We all miss him very much, especially now that 
we know he has gone. 

Trainmaster Pritchett has just returned from 
an extended trip through the east and west. 

Superintendent C. G. Stevens is now enjoying 
a vacation. 

Fireman Henry Holder left Monday evening 
for a trip to New York, Pittsburgh and Wash- 
ington, D. C. While in the east he expects to 
visit other places of importance. 

W. J. Bassett, maintenance of way time- 
keeper in division accountant's office at Flora, 
has been promoted to assistant supervisor at 
North Vernon, Ind. Mr. Bassett has had 
considerable experience in the Maintenance 
of Way Department, he having been in charge 
of the Maintenance of Way Bureau since the 
establishing of the division accounting organi- 
zation and previous to that time was in the 
office of the division engineer. We feel sure 
that Mr. Bassett will make good in his new 
position. The leaving of Mr. Bassett necessi- 
tated several changes in the division account- 
ant's office. 

• G. A. Hamer, general yardmaster, East St. 
Louis, is away on his annual vacation. He 
expects to visit relatives in Indiana. 

Edward R. Walsh, former live stock agent 
at the National Stock Yards, has joined the 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 



colors and is stationed at the Chester ship 
yards, Chester, Pa. Before leaving the em- 
ploye of the Baltimore and Ohio his fellow 
employes presented him a handsome wrist 
watch. 



Washington, Ind., Shops 

Correspondent, J. R. Minter, Shop Draftsman 

In the May issue of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine, the writer notes one of 
the Illinois Division correspondents states that 
E. E. Marshall, stores clerk in division ac- 
countant's office at Flora, is ambitious to be 
a chaplain in the army. Mr. Marshall must 
have reformed. Sometime ago, while serving 
on the councilman's board of the city of Flora, 
he was seen emerging from an alley at midnight 
with an empty chip basket on his arm. Earlier 
in the evening the basket was full (we don't 
know what the contents were). Will the cor- 
respondent please explain Mr. Marshall's ac- 
tions, so as to clear up his record. 

Friday, June 14, we had Flag Day exercises in 
which a large number of employes participated. 
Miss Minnie Cox sang the "Star- Spangled 
Banner" while old glory was being raised to 
the top of flag pole on the office building. 
Judge W. R. Gardiner, Company attorney, and 
also a veteran employe, gave an interesting 
address, which was received enthusiastically by 
the employes. 

Russell Isenogle, formerly clerk in the super- 
intendent of shops' office, and who enlisted in 
the army, was recently married to Miss May 
Gilliatt, of this city, at Camp Laurel, Md. 
The boys at the shop wish Russell much joy 
and happiness during the period of his "second 
enlistment." 

M. W. Luke, general boiler foreman, spends 
his spare time racing around the country in his 
ninety horsepower "Blue Devil" racer. He re- 
cently put an exhaust whistle four feet long on 
it that can be heard twenty miles, more or less; 
if you don't believe it, ask "Jack" Stroud, super- 
visor of electric welding. 



Toledo Division 

Correspondent, F. M. Drake, Relief Agent 
Dayton, Ohio. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent 

E. J. CoRRKLL Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

H. W. Brant Trainmaster 

F. J. Parrish Division Engineer 

L. E. Clayton Division Operator 

M. DiBLiNG Machinist, Lima, O. 

Edward Keefe Road Engineer, Ivorydale, O. 

T. J. McDERMOTf Road Conductor, Dayton, O. 

H. T. Heilman Secretary to Superintendent, Lima, O. 

Dr. F. H. Hutchinson Medical Examiner, Lima, O. 

Dk. R. C. Potter Medical Examiner, East Dayton, O. 




'Doi¥t*t©llW#~^ 
you never had a chance! 

"Four years ago you and I worked at the 
same desk. We were both discontented. Re- 
member the noon we saw the International 
Correspondence Schools' advertisement .f* That 
woke me up. I realized that to get ahead I 
needed special training, and decided to let the 
I. C. S. help me. I wanted you to do the same, 
but you said, 'Aw, forget it!' I have been 
climbing ever since; you had the same chance 
I had, but you turned it down. No, Jim, you 
can't expect promotion until you've trained 
yourself to handle bigger work." 



There are lots of "Jims" in the world — in stores, 
factories, railroads, offices, everywhere. Are you one 
of them ? Wake up ! Every time you 3ee an I. C. S. 
coupon your chance is staring you in the face. Don't 
turn it down. 

Right now over one hundred thousand men are 
preparing themselves for better and bigger jobs 
through I. C. S. courses. You can join them and 
get in line for promotion. Mark and mail this 
coupon, and find out how. 

INfERNAflONAL cTRRTsPO^NDTNCfsCHOOLS 

SCRANTON, PA. 

how I can qualify for the position, 
mark X. 

□ BOOKKEEPER 
I] R. R. Agency Accounting 

□ R. R. Gen'l Office Acc'ting 
Higher Accounting 
Stenographer and Typist 

ID Mathematics 

□ SALESMANSHIP 

□ ADVERTISING 

□ Railway Mail Clerk 
"CIVIL SERVICE 

KLECTUICAL ENGINEER 
Electrician 
Electric Wiring 
Electric Lighting 
Electric Railways 
Telegraph Engineer 
Telephone Work 
MINE FOREMAN OR EPiG'R 
Metallurgist or Prospector 
CHEMIST 

AUTOmOHU.E OPERATING 

□ Auto Repairing 

□ Good English inSpanUb 

□ agriculture !□ French 

□ P« 



BOX 851 0, 

Explain, without obligating me, 
or in the subject, before which I 

□ LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER 

□ Locomotive Fireman 

□ Traveling Engineer 

□ Traveling Fireman 

□ Air Brake Inspector 

□ Air Brake Repairman 

□ Round House Foreman 

□ Trainmen and Carmen 

□ Railway Conductor 

□ MECHANICAL ENGINEER 
Mechanical Draftsman 
Machine Shop Practice 
Boiler Maker or Designer 

□ Stationary Engineer 

□ Gas Engine Operating 

□ CIVIL ENGINEER 

□ Surveying and Mapping 

□ R. R. Constructing 

□ Bridge Engineer 

□ ARCHITECT 

□ Architectural Draftsman 

□ Contractor and Builder 

□ Structural Engineer 

□ Concrete Builder 

□ TRAFFIC MANAGER 



I'oiiltry Raising 



Italian 



Name 

Present 
Occupation . 

Street 

anc" No 



City. 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



78 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




FLAG RAISING AT HAMILTON, OHIO 



Flag day was celebrated by several hundred 
employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
System of Hamilton in the yards across from 
the depot, when a flag raising ceremony was 
held and addresses were delivered by Mayor 
C. J. Smith, who presided, Judge Clarence 
Murphy and Judge E. A. Belden. 

Then the ''Star-Spangled Banner" was sung, 
the flag was raised amid the cheers of the men, 
who have demonstrated their patriotism by 
subscribing to approximately $15,000 in Liberty 
Bonds and hundreds of dollars worth of Thrift 
Stamps, besides aiding other causes which ulti- 
mately will help win the war. 

Judge Murphy in his address pointed out to 
the men that they can do as much in helping 
win the war by working diligently and con- 
scientiously in moving supplies and material as 
the men in the trenches and called upon them 
to do their utmost, as every minute's delay 
might mean greater loss of life. 



Mayor Smith appealed to their patriotism 
and said, "The Stars and Stripes never trailed 
in the dust and never will." Further he stated, 
"The Kaiser said Americans must use the ships 
that he designated and must land only at places 
designated by him. The American boys are 
in France now, giving their answer to this com- 
mand. Back them up!" 

Because of the construction of retaining dams, 
brought about by the Miami Conservancy Act, 
between Dayton and Tippecanoe, Ohio, the 
main track of this division from mile post 64 
to 73 has commenced to pass throujrh a general 
reconstruction. In its present location between 
these points, original construction was made 
along the Miami River bank and at the time of 
the March (1913) flood was covered with 
several feet of water. In order to prevent a re- 
occurrence of this kind and also to not interfere 
with the construction of the retaining dams, 




ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT AND AGENT'S FORCE— ROSSFORD, OHIO 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



79 



our track will be moved westward from 100 to 
1,500 feet of its present location and elevated 
as much as twenty-five feet in some places. 
It is expected that four years will be required 
to complete the entire construction of the dams. 

Effective June 24 E. J. Rothwell is appointed 
storekeeper at Lima, Ohio, vice V. N. Dawson, 
furloughed for military duty. 



Sandy Valley & Elkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, L. E. Gatewood, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Laughlin Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenship Section Foreman 

S. H. Johnson Engineer 

E. E. Cassidy Fireman 

J. M. Moore Conductor 



□ □ □ 



Pensioner, Still Hale and Hearty, Enjoying Rest 
After Long Service 



On this page is a picture of D. F. Sheubridge, 
his daughter, grand-daughter and great grand- 
daughter. Mr. Sheubridge entered the service 
of the Baltimore and Ohio in 1862 and after 
fifty-one years of faithful service was pensioned 
in June, 1914. He served in the capacity of 
water boy when he first became connected 
with the Company and by close application 
to his duties rose to the position of engineman. 

Mr. Sheubridge was born at Harper's Ferry 



in June, 1845, and, although seventy-three years 
old, is still hale and hearty. He operated the 
first engine to cross the new bridge at Harper's 
Ferry and also engines No. 218 and 202, which 
were run upon the old bridge at the time of the 
Johnstown flood. It will be remembered that 
several Baltimore and Ohio engines were 
rushed to the old bridge to prevent its being 
washed away. The great weight on the struc- 
ture proved effective. 




D. F. SHEUBRIDGE, DAUGHTER. GRANDDAUGHTER AND GREAT-GRANDDAUGHTER 



80 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



SVlOTt 



451 stories 



plew stones. 



long 



stones 



Ad tops- 



This Story For 
Yourself — 

The girl got $6 a week and was lonely. " Piggy " — you 
can imagine his kind — ^was waiting downstairs. He knew 

where champagne and music could be had. But that night she didn't 
go. That was Lord Kitchener's doing. But another night ? 

12 

Volumes 



O.HENRY 



tells about it in this story, with that full knowledge 
of women, with that frank facing of sex, and that clean 

mind that has endeared him to the men and women of the land. 
From the few who snapped up the first edition at $125 a set before it 
was off the press, to the 120,000 who have eagerly sought the beautiful 
volumes offered you here — from the professional man who sits among 
his books to the man on the street and to the woman in every walk of 
life — the whole nation bows to O. Henry — and hails him with love 
and pride as our greatest writer of stories. 

This is but one of the 274 stories, in 12 big volumes, 
you get for 37^ cents a weel<, if you send the coupon 



To Those Who Are Quick 

KIPLING Volumes 

GIVEN AWAY 



Never was there an offer like this. Not only do you get your 274 
O. Henry stories in 12 volumes at less than others paid for one volume of 
the first edition, but you get Kipling's best 179 short stories and poems and his long 
novel — without paying a cent. You get 18 volumes, packed with love and hate and 
laughter — a big shelf full of handsome books. 



Send the 
CouponWith 
oat Money 



Send the Coupon and you will 
understand why O.Henry is hailed 
as " The American Kipling." 

From East to West; from North 
to South ; by all the peoples of the world, 
O. Henry has been eagerly seized upon 
as their own. The millionaire and the man 
who stoically wonders where the next mouth- 
ful is coming from, the buddine debutante, 
and the wayward sister, all feel in common 
the kindly touch of the human heart in O. 
Henry's stories. One and all have felt that 
at last here was the chance to see the hearts 
of every kind of person, to get a world of 
pleasure, and a library of the best and most 
worthy literature obtainable. 

We will ship the complete 
sets so that you can look them 
over in your home and then de- 
cide whether or not you wish 
to buy. If you are not delighted 
with O. Henry and the free 
Kipling notify us and we will 
take the sets back as cheerfully 
as we sent them. How could 
any proposition be more fair? 

Tbe Cloth Binding 

If you prefer the set of O. Henry 
in cloth bindinc change price $ 19.50 
to $15.00, and change monthl^ay- 



Send the Coupon and you will 
understand as never before why 
other nations are going wild over him. 

Why memorials to him are being 
prepared ; why universities are planning 
tablets to his memory ; why text books 
of English literature are including his 
stories; why colleges are discussing his 
place in literature ; why theatrical firms 
are vying for rights to dramatize his 
stories; why newspapers all over the 
country are continually offering big 
sums for the right to reprint his stories. 



FOLD HERE, TEAR OUT, SIGN AND MAIL 



menta from $1.50 to $1.00. mere 
is so small a difference however 
between the price of the cloth and 
the beautiful half leather tliat we 
strongly urge our customers to 
buy tbe bslfleathrr. 



INSPECTION COUPON 

THE RIVERSIDE PUBLISHING CO. 

543-549 Marquette Bldg.. Chicago. IlUnofs 

Please ship me on approval the Works of O. Henry. 12 volumes, half lea'ner 
bindine. tjold tops. Also the 6 volumes set of Kipline bound in silk cloth. If I 
keep the books I will pay you $1 00 as first payment within 10 days after books 
are received and 11.50 per month until your special price of $19.50 for the O. 
Henry set only is paid, and it is agreed I am to retain the Kipling set without 
charge. If not satisfactory I will notify you within 10 days and return both sets 
to you as soon as you give me shipping instructions as offered readers ol 
Tbe Baltimore and Ohio Employet Magazine, 



Name — 
Address. 



OccupatloiL. 



I 'lease mention our maffazine ivhen writing advertisers 



The Only Girl Who 
Commanded a 
Nation's Annies 



A simple little girl of sixteen played 
one day in a little lost village. The 
next year, in supreme command of all 
the troops of France, she led them in 
triumph to victory. 

Great dukes bowed before this girl, 
v^ho could not read. Sinful men, men 
who had cursed and drunk and mur- 
dered all their days, followed her 
meekly. 

It is the most dramatic, the most 
amazing story in the whole story of 
human life. In the dim, far-off past, 
Joan of Arc went her shining way in 
France — and her story was never told 
as it should have been till it was told 
by an American — 



MARK TWAIN 



To us whose chuckles had turned to tears over 
the pathos of "Huckleberry Finn" — to us who 
felt the cutting edge of "Innocents Abroad" — 
the coming of "Joan of Arc" from the pen of 
Mark Twain was no surprise. 
The story began as an anonymous romance in 
Harper*s Magazine, but within a few months the 
secret was out. Who but Mark Twain could 
have written it? Who could have written this 



book that has almost the simplici'ty, ',;^e loftiness 
of the Bible — but with a whimsical touv^h which 
makes it human? Mark Twain's Joar of Arc is 
no cold statue in a church — no bronze on a 
pedestal, but a warm, _ human, loving girl. 
Read "Joan of Arc" if you would read the most 
sublime thing that has come from the pen of any 
American. Read "Joan of Arc" if you would 
know Mark Twain in all his greatness. It is ao 
curate history told in warm story form. 



The Price Goes Up Again 



Great American 

Born poor — growing up in 
shabby little town on the Mis- 
sissippi — a pilot — a seeker for 
gold — a printer — Mark Twain 
was molded on the frontier of 
America. 

The vastness of the West — the 
fearlessness of the pioneer — the 
clear philosophy of the country 
boy were his — and they stayed 
with him in all simplicity to the 
last day of those glorious later 
days — when German Emperor 
and English King — Chinese 
Mandarin and plain American, 
all alike, wept for him. 



23 VOLUMES 
Novels — Stories — Humor — Essays — Travels- 
History 

A few months ago we had to raise the price a little. 
That raise in price was a very small one. It does 
not matter much if you missed it. But now 
the price must go up again. ^ The rising costs 
make it impossible for us to continue the sale 
of Mark Twain at a low price. New y li 
editions will cost very much more than 
this Author's National Edition. 

Mail the Coupon At Once, and Ohio 

It brings the whole set — all charges E. M. 

prepaid— for your examination. ^ HARPER & 
Return the books at our ex- ^ BROTHERS 
pense if they are not what X N*.wYoru' 
you thought them to be. ^ 

Send the coupon — no ^ ' Send me, all charges pre- 
rnoney— withou t obHga- paid, set of Mark Twain's 

tion. This edition of Works in 25 vols., illustrated, 

Mark Twain will be bound in handsome green doth, 

withdrawn. There ^ stamped in gold If not satisfactory . 
rset"tfferld'''"u / ^ expense, 
at so low ^a" ./^ Otherwise I will send you $1.00 within 5 
price. So ^ days, and $2.00 a month for 14 months 
send the 
coupon ^ 
today- ^ Name. 
NOW. 



Harper ® Brothers, New YorK 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



StifersIndigoQoth 

Standard for over 75 years 

Lithe &st line trenches of mdustry- 




In shipyard, munition plant, rail- 
road, machine shop and on the 
farm — there's where garments of 
Stifel's Indigo and 
Miss Stifel Indigo 
(the special ladieis* 
overall cloth) are 
giving record 
service. 

Ifs the Cloth in the Garment 
that Gives the Wear! 



Don't take chances 
with work clothes 
made of unknown, un- 
tried fabrics. 

Insist upon overalls, 
work shirts and pants 
of Stifel's Indigo— 
it's the strongest fast 
color work garment 
doth made. 

Look for this trademark 




UEGISTERED 

on the back of the cloth 
inside the garment 
before you buy to be 
sure you are getting genuine 
Stifel's Indigo Cloth. 




I'lcase iticniion our ruagazine when wrUiny advertisers 



B a I ti mor c K i o 

c^es Magazine 




{Committee on Public Information) 



THEY SHALL NOT PASS 



SEPTEMBER, 1918 



THE FOOD SITUATION 

[No. 5 OF A SERIES] 



THERE are many advantages to be 
gained by dehydrating fruits and vege- 
tables: Transportation costs are saved, 
spoilage is reduced to a minimum, the fresh 
flavor is largely retained, and less packing 
material is needed. 

Right now the conservation of tin is im- 
portant; and the following figures regarding 
the canning of peas show what large quanti- 
ties of this metal may be saved as a result 
of the more extensive use of this method of 
preservation: 100 pounds of green peas will 



need 128 cans when put up in the ordinary 
manner. The same amount of green peas 
when dehydrated make 2734 pounds. If 
packed in tin containers of the same size as 
those used for ordinary canning they would 
require only 31 cans. 

This represents a saving of 75 per cent, in 
tinplate, cases, and shipping space, a con- 
spicuous example of the economy of taking 
water out of foods that must be stored or 
shipped. 



THE UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION asks you to get 
behind our soldiers, sailors and associates by sending them now the most 
food possible in the least shipping space. Every man, woman and child 
in America can help by eating less wheat, beef, pork, fats and sugar, more 
of other plentiful foods which cannot be shipped, and by avoiding waste. 



EAT PLENTY, WISELY. WITHOUT WASTE. 
AND HELP WIN THE WAR 



Heprinl from nuilcrial furnished by the 



UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 

■ ■ . III ,. . 11 u U .I.M I. n _ g,,«.,»a«.^...K»m»,.._^ I I , ■ ■ 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



□ i;ii:m:ii:a:oiim!!::iiiiii^ MWMlKf^WM INOIISTRIES mmiJi!::!ii:oiiiiiv!ii:ii:iniiii:iEa:ii:ii:iii 



Insure Your Shells 

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Where to Spend Your Vacation 



Employes are urged to patronize the 
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vacation. They promise to extend a 
cordial welcome to Baltimore and Ohio 
employes. 



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ON THE TOP OF THE ALLEGHENIES 

Brookside Inn and Cottages 

10 miles from Oakland, Md., and 3,000 feet above sea 
level. Best of everything — write for booklet. 

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OAKLAND, MD., POSTOFFICE 



Virginia Beach, Va. 

The Pocahontas and Annex 



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Tie a Can to the Kaiser Every Day in the Week 



A WAR SAVER IS A LIFE-SAVER 



BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Volume 6 BALTIMORE, SEPTEMBER, 1918 Number 5 



CONTENTS 

Federal Plan of Safety Work 5 

W. D. Anderson Warns of Carelessness on Railroads 9 

Frank C. Reynolds, Counsel, Dead 1 1 

Director General Urges Courtesy. H 

First United States Standardized Locomotive 17 

Dining Car Service Helps Conserve Sugar 18 

Winners of Prize Contest Announced 19 

Arnold Kennedy Wounded in France 21 

"Barney" Metzger and His Career. By J. A. Clarkson 22 

John Herbert Gochnauer Gassed 23 

Railroad Administration Orders 24 

Letters From "Over There" 26 

News of the Veterans' Association 30 

Changes and Promotions 31 

Lieutenant F. W. Forshey Now "Sea Pilot" 34 

United States Needs Nurses at Once 35 

Home Dressmaker's Corner 37 

Editorial 42 

Safety First Roll of Honor 44 

Baseball Activities 47 

Mount Clare Shops Outing 51 

Among Ourselves 52 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of 
interest and greater efRciency. Contributions are welcomed 
from all employes. Manuscripts and photographs will be re- 
turned upon request. Please write on one side of the sheet only. 



HIRAM W. BELNAP 
Manager Safety Section, Division of Transportation 
United States Railroad Administration 



Federal Plan for Conducting Safety Work in 
Effect on the Baltimore and Ohio. 
Will Help to Conserve Man-Power 



OHE man behind the machine is 
as important to the country now 
as the man behind the gun. 
''Over There" is a test of cour- 
age. ''Over Here" is a test of loyalty. 
Every employe of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad has the opportunity to 
demonstrate this loyalty through the 
observance of Safety rules. . 

After investigation, the United States 
Railroad Administration has adopted the 
division plan of Safety organization simi- 
lar to that which the Baltimore and 
Ohio has had in force for many years. 
The Federal management has thought so 
well of the Safety work that it has named 
H. W. Belnap,. formerly chief of the Safety 
Division, Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion, as manager of the Safety Section, 
Division of Transportation, United States 
Railroad Administration. 

In the appointment of Mr. Belnap to 
direct the Safety work of the railroads 
of the United States, the Federal adminis- 
tration made a happy selection. He is 
familiar with all branches of the opera- 
tion of railroads. He began his career 
as a station telegrapher and served as a 
passenger and then a freight brakeman. 
His rise to his present position has been 
gradual and in all the occupations in 
which he served he familiarized himself 
with working and operating conditions. 
He knows the practical side of the opera- 
tion of big railroads and the value of the 
observance of Safety rules. 

Born in Nakomis, Illinois, June 21, 
1867, Mr. Belnap was the son of an 
operator and agent of the Indianapolis 
and St. Louis Railroad, now the St. Louis 



Division of the Cleveland, Cincinnati, 
Chicago and St. Louis Railroad. The 
father was in service for more than thirty 
years, and the son drifted into the work 
when quite young, learning telegraph}- 
under the father and assisting him in 
telegraphy and station work for two 
years. The younger Belnap longed to 
get into the operating end of the business, 
and he served as passenger brakeman six 
months, then becoming freight brakeman 
for a little more than two years. In 
1893 he was made a freight conductor. 
From that time until 1903 he was em- 
ployed on the St. Louis Division of the 
Big Four in that capacity. 

Resigning his position there August 1, 
1903, he entered the service of the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission as an In- 
spector of Safety Appliance. On July 1, 
1911, he was made chief inspector. 
Recently he was selected manager of the 
Safety Section under the Federal adminis- 
tration of the lailroads. 

One of the most important phases of 
the Safet}^ work is the appointment of 
Safety Agents, who will devote their entire 
time to this work, one being located in the 
territory of each general superintendent. 
These agents will report to J. T. Broderick, 
Supervisor, Safety and Welfare Depart- 
ment, with headquarters at Baltimore. 

The Safety Agents to be selected will 
be men who are enthusiastic about the 
work and who will be able to practice 
what they preach and will instill the neces- 
sity of safety and loyalty into the minds 
of employes. 

One cannot long remain in the railroad 
service without realizing the fact that 



5 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



many lives and limbs are unnecessarily 
lost and the accidents that caused the 
loss are preventable. 

Men should think before they act, 
and to know whether the work in hand 
is being performed in a manner securing 
their safety. Steps taken to secure a 
proper tool with which to do work safely 
or to avoid danger are Safety Steps and 
should be taken in every case to prevent 
a possible accident. What man would 
not willingly take those steps after an 
accident? No sacrifice seems too great 
to the man who has lost a limb or an eye, 
;f by making the sacrifice he could be 
restored to his former physical condi- 
tion. 

Mr. Thompson and Mr. Galloway, the 
Federal Managers, issued the following 
circular to all officers and employes urging 
them to help with the Safety work: — 

''You are particularly urged to give 
every assistance in carrying on the Safety 
First work. H. W. Belnap, formerly 
chief of the Safety Division, Interstate 
Commerce Commission, has been ap- 
pointed manager of the Safety Section, 
Division of Transportation, by the Direc- 
tor General of Railroads, with head- 
quarters at Washington, D. C. 

'Tn addition to the work now being 
done by the various Safety Committees, 
Safety Agents will be appointed on each 
general superintendent's district, who 
will devote their entire time to this work, 
reporting to J. T. Broderick, Supervisor, 
Safety and Welfare Department, head- 
quarters Baltimore, Md." 

In addition to the Division and Shop 
Committees, as organized in the past, 
the Federal Managers have also ordered 
the appointment of a General Committee 
and Terminal and Pier or Freight Station 
Committe(5K. The General Committee 
will consist of the following: 

Federal Mari;i,g(!r, Chairman. 

Assistant to Vcdvm] Manag(;r(Oporating). 

Assistant to Fedciral Manager. 

(Umoral Managers. 

Manag(;r. 

Assif-'tant (general Manager. 
General Solicitor. 
General Claim Agent. 



Chief Engineer. 
Signal Engineer. 

General Superintendent of Transporta- 
tion. 

Superintendent of Relief Department. 

Superintendent of Telegraph. 

General Superintendents. 

General Superintendent Maintenance of 
Way and Structures. 

Engineer Maintenance of Way. 

General Superintendent Maintenance of 
Equipment. 

Superintendent Maintenance of Equip- 
ment. 

District Superintendents Motive Power. 
Purchasing Agent. 
Electrical Engineer. 
General Storekeeper. 
Engineer of Tests. 
Real Estate Agent. 
Superintendent of Insurance. 
General Superintendent of PoHce. 
Superintendent of Police. 
Superintendent of Dining Car Service. 
Superintendent Timber Preservation. 
Superintendent of Station Service. 
Manager Mail and Express Traffic. 
Supervisor Safety and Welfare Depart- 
ment. 

There will be absolute uniformity in 
the personnel of the Divisional Safety 
Committees. The following standard 
has been adopted and these officials will 
serve on the committees: 

Permanent Members 

Superintendent, Chairman. 

Assistant Superintendents. 

Trainmaster. 

Division Engineer. 

Superintendent of Shops. 

Master Mechanic. 

Road Foreman of Engines. 

Division Operator. 

Medical Examiner. 

Captain of Police. 

Division Claim Agent. 

Signal Supervisor. 

Division Storekeeper. 

Mast(^r Carpent(ir. 

Secretary Railroad Y. M. C. A. 

R(;presentative Female Employes. 

Secretary. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



7 



Rotating Members 

Yardmaster. 
An Agent. 
An Operator. 
Track Supervisor. 
Signal Maintainer. 
Bridge Foreman. 
Carpenter Foreman. 
Bridge Carpenter. 
Engineer, Passenger. 
Engineer, Freight. 
Fireman, Passenger. 
Fireman, Freight. 
Conductor, Passenger. 
Conductor, Freight. 

Baggagemaster or Brakeman, Passenger. 

Brakeman, Freight. 

Yard Brakeman. 

Car Repairman or Inspector. 

Shopman from Locomotive Department. 

Shopman from Car Department. 

The Terminal Safety Committees will 
consist of the following officials : 

Permanent Members 

Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent 

or Trainmaster, Chairman. 
Day Yardmaster. 
Night Yardmaster. 
Foreman Car Department. 
Foreman Locomotive Department. 
Electrician. 

Secretary Railroad Y. M. C. A. 

Medical Examiner. 

Agent. 

Secretary. 

Rotating Members 

Yard Engineer. 
Yard Fireman. 
Yard Conductor. 
Yard Brakeman. 
Yard Clerk. 

Shopman, Car Department. 
Shopman, Locomotive Department. 
Car Repairman or Inspector. 
Track Foreman or Workmen. 

Shop Committees will be formed at 
all shops where the authorized force 
consists of fifty or more employes and 



will be composed of the > following offi- 
cials : 

Permanent Members 

Superintendent of Shops or Master 

Mechanic, Chairman. 
General Foreman. 
General Car Foreman. 
Storekeeper. 
Surgeon. 

Supervisor of Machine and Hand Tools. 

Assistant Master Carpenter. 

Shop Yardmaster. 

Electric Crane Engineer. 

Secretary. 

Rotating Members 

Machinist. 
Boilermaker. 
Pipe Fitter. 
Foundryman. 
Tender Repairman. 
Blacksmith. 
Electrician. 
Electric Welder. 
Material Distributer. 
Car Builder. 

Machine Operator (wood) . 

Carpenter. 

Upholsterer. 

Painter. 

Millwright. 

Pier and Freight Station Committees 
will be formed where the authorized 
platform force consists of twenty-five 
or more men. In cities where more 
than one pier or freight station is located 
members will be selected from each. 
The committees will be composed of the 
following officials: 

Permanent Members 

Assistant Superintendent or Terminal 

Agent, Chairman. 
Marine Supervisor. 
Principal Agent. 

• Rotating Members 

Pier Foreman. 
Elevator Foreman. 
Tug Fireman. 

Platform Foreman, Outbound. 
Platform Foreman, Inbound. 
Checker. 



UNITED STATES RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION 

W. G. McAdoo, Director General of Railroads 



Baltimore & Ohio RaiIroad< 



I 'Eastern Lines 
\New York Terminals 



Staten Island Rapid Transit Railway 
Western Maryland Railway 
Cumberland Valley Railroad 
Cumberland & Pennsylvania Railroad 
Coal & Coke Railway 
Wheeling Terminal Railway 



Coal Will Win The War-Save Coal 



TO ALL EMPLOYES: 

Our probable SHORTAGE OF COAL this year is estimated at 75 million 
tons. That amount of COAL MUST BE SAVED by STOPPING WASTE OF 
COAL and by MORE EFFICIENT USE OF COAL. 

SAVING COAL is vitally necessary WAR WORK and every patriotic railroad 
man will increase his efforts to SAVE COAL. 

Every railroad man CAN SAVE COAL every day. Employes of the Operating 
Department CAN SAVE MOST COAL. In no way can any railroad man do more 
towards winning the war than by SAVING COAL. 

Every scoop of COAL YOU SAVE will produce 4 pounds of finished steel war 
material ; 4 pounds of SHIP PLATE built into the bottom of a ship ; 4 pounds of 
GUN STEEL finished in a gun; 4 pounds of SHELL STEEL in finished form. 

A 3-inch shell for a field gun weighs 20 pounds. SAVE 5 SCOOPS OF COAL 
and you land a shell in the ranks of the enemy. If you waste 5 scoops of coal you 
prevent the making of a 3-inch shell or its equivalent— you do just that and no less. 
That is how closely our ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY WAR WORK is dependent 
upon the COAL YOU SAVE. 

Every railroad man KNOWS HOW he can SAVE COAL. Every scoop of coal 
you use represents an average investment of three cents. When you spend it, get 
results. Do not waste it by thoughtless, careless methods. Think then act intel- 
ligently patriotically and see that those who work with you do likewise. 

Waste of coal or failure to SAVE COAL NOW is in its effect giving aid and 
comfort to the enemy. 



OFFICE OF FEDERAL MANAGER 



Baltimore, Md., August 20, 1918 



Coal Will Win The War- Save Coal 




Federal Safety Appliance Inspector Points 
Out the Duty of Every Railroad Man 
in Conserving Man-Power on 
"Battlefields" of U. S. 



1^ ISREGARD of per- 
JLI sonal safety is cost- 
ing more lives of 
Americans than are 
the devastating guns of the 
German hordes who are at- 
tempting to sweep over the 
whole of Europe and en- 
slave its peoples. This stirring compari- 
son of the sacrifice of lives was graphically 
portrayed by W. D. Anderson, Federal 
Appliance Inspector, in an address before 
the Divisional Safety First meeting of 
the Chicago Division, held at The Inn, 
Wawasee, Indiana, in July. 

The meeting was well attended and 
Mr. Anderson's address was one of the 
most inspiring ever heard by the members 
of the Safety First Committee of this 
division. After the business meeting, 
the members of the committee were en- 
tertained, with their families, with motion 
pictures. 

Mr. Anderson spoke as follows: 
''There never has been a time in the 
history of our country when the con- 
servation of human life and limb meant 
so much to us as a nation as at the pre- 
sent time. We are at war with a power- 
ful nation that threatens destruction to 
democratic forms of government. The 
sacrifice of human life will be enormous 
and cannot be controlled while the great 
end is being achieved. We stand behind 
those boys 'over there' who are fighting 
to perpetuate the glorious principles laid 
down in our Constitution and are fur- 
nishing the nucleus for a victorious and 
lasting peace for the world. While this 
is being done we are willingly abstaining 
from certain foodstuffs on certain days of 
the week, living within certain allowances 




on other necessities and 
supporting by contributions 
every laudable cause tend- 
ing toward the assistance 
and relief of those who 
occupy the trenches. 

"I do not believe that 
there is a railroad man here 
today who would not willingly and 
promptly offer his service, if, by so doing, 
he knew that his personal action would 
lessen the casualties and maintain the 
man-power on which this nation depends 
in this war. In his character as a rail- 
road man his devotion to duty singles him 
out where he stands above every crafts- 
man on the face of the earth. In his 
chosen occupation he willingly assumes 
such risks and endures such hardships as 
none but a soldier knows. Faithful to 
his trust he forgets self that the precious 
lives may have his protection in their 
journey over his railroad. Constantly 
vigilant with years of training and ap- 
parently unmindful of physical and men- 
tal hardships, he exhibits a spirit of 
determination, fortitude and obedience 
that ranks him among the heroes. 
Frequently his home comings are cut so 
short that he sees his little ones only as 
they sleep. Next to his family his heart 
is in his work. No civic occupation on 
the face of the earth requires such sacri- 
fices nor receives such unselfish devotion, 
day in and day out, as are given by the 
employes of railroads' in the natural and 
ordinary discharge of duty. They stand 
by themselves. 

"At the present time, in this great 
crisis, not one of them may be spared. 
The enormous exports that must be kept 
moving to insure our boys provisions 



10 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



while fighting 'over there' depend upon 
the army of raih-oad men to keep the 
stream of necessities moving, and I 
beheve that every one of you is doing his 
duty in that respect. 

"But, there is another duty so vitally 
interwoven with his work that he should 
consider it as important as any he is doing 
at present. The conservation of human 
life and limb is playing just as important 
a part on this side of the Atlantic as the 
battles that are being fought on the other 
side. In years gone by, there was no 
personal obligation felt by one railroad 
man toward another as to his education 
in Safety First matters. Each man was 
supposed to govern himself and assume 
such risks as he saw fit to undertake. 
Safety devices were practically unheard 
of and the man who shirked any duty 
because he was afraid of its danger was 
dismissed as incompetent. A man's effi- 
ciency was based upon his courage, his 
alertness and his judgment to execute the 
maneuvers that were necessary in the 
operation of a train or yard. The 'green' 
man was not taught how to safely accom- 
plish details, but followed the object 
lessons of men older in experience, re- 
gardless of his personal convictions. On 
this old established theory of rating a 
man's efficiency it is not difficult to 
understand why our old timers are not 
more enthusiastic over Safety First 
teachings. 

*'It is hard for them to conceive, after 
years of apparent disinterest in their 
personal welfare as regards their safety, 
that they should now become objects of 
solicitude. No one gave any particular 
attention to Safety First matters until the 
Government connnenced to publish statis- 
tics, then the awful tmth dawned upon all. 

''With tho advent of the Governm(;nt 
taking over the railroads you entered a 
new era. There is also a crisis at hand. 
I want every one of you to wak(i up and 
listen to the story of youi- apat hy, i hen go 
home and m(!ditat(; ov(u- it. 1 would not , 
for th(^ world, lunko the charge that any 
one of our fc^llow-workc^rs was killed 
through our ncgligcuice, but does it not 
raise thc^ qu(^stion in yrnir mind whether 
he might not have \)v,vm span^d had 
some one warned liiiii? VVlu^n we read 



the report of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission on this subject it seems un- 
believable, but here are some figures 
showing the casualties upon railroads in 
America and should awaken us to our 
duty as our brother's keeper. 

''For the year ending December 31, 
1916, there were a total of 206,723 
casualties, of which 10,001 were killed 
and 8,008 injured; there were 2,210 of 
our boys in train service killed and 48,310 
injured in the actual performance of duty; 
there were also 303 employees killed and 
811 injured who were not on duty. 

"Mr. Belnap, manager of the Safety 
Section of the Division of Transportation 
of the United States Railroad Administra- 
tion, furnishes me with the information 
that : 

" 'Thirty per cent, of all the people 
killed and ninety per cent, of all the 
people injured on railroads in this country 
were railroad employes. One employe 
is killed every three and one-half hours 
and one employe is injured every ten 
minutes in train accidents alone, and 
taking into account all accidents, one 
employe is either killed or injured every 
three minutes during the entire year.' 

"Were such a report to reach us from 
over in France, the effect would be dis- 
heartening and fill our souls with sorrow. 

"Can you conceive the magnitude of 
this sacrifice? Does the situation become 
clearer and suggest to your conscience 
v.that you have some responsibility in the 
matter? Does it not logically follow that 
by permitting this slaughter on our side 
of the Atlantic that we are weakening 
our man-power and thereby aiding the 
Kaiser on the other side? The Govern- 
ment is asking you to conserve. Do 
you understand that the most efficient 
conservation possible is the saving of 
human lives? Stop and think what it 
means to kill and mann more than 
50,000 able-bodi(Hl, trained men in one 
year. Do you wonder that the Govern- 
ment has interested itself in Safc^ty First 
matters? 

"I am in hopc^s that this grand work 
will ix; tak( n up by every woman in this 
comitry. I know of no greater nnpetus 
to Saf(^ty First than to enlist in our serv- 
ice; th(i faithful wives and daughters. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



11 



♦ ''In conclusion, I wish to call attention 
to the beautiful sentiment expressed by 
our Director General, which shows his 
confidence, his reliance and his depen- 
dence in his great army of railroad men. 
It breathes a spirit of fraternal trust in 
each of you that should awaken the best 
there is in you. 

''There are two battlefields: One is 
in France, the other is in America. We 
hear what glorious deeds of valor are 
being done 'over there' by the men 
who are giving their lives for the flag. 
Let the great army on which the nation 
depends on this side of the Atlantic 
show what it can do in the way of 
cooperation and merit the fullest trust 
that has been placed in us by our 



Director General who uttered these 
words : 

"'I want the oflftcers and employes to 
get the spirit of this new era. Supreme 
devotion to country, an invincible deter- 
mination to perform the imperative 
duties of the hour while the life of the 
nation is imperiled by war, must oblit- 
erate old enmities and make friends 
and comrades of us all. There must 
be cooperation, not antagonism; con- 
fidence, not suspicion; mutual helpful- 
ness, not grudging performance; just 
consideration, not arbitrary disregard 
of each other's rights and feelings. A fine 
discipline based upon mutual respect and 
sympathy. An earnest desire to serve the 
great public faithfully and efficiently.' " 



□ □ □ 

Frank C. Reynolds, Counsel, Dead 



HE death of Frank C. Reynolds, 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
counsel at Keyser, W. Va., re- 
moves from the service one of 
the most efficient attorneys and from his 
home city a man who was greatly re- 
spected for his legal ability and personal 
charm. His friends and acquaintances 
were shocked greatly when news of his 
end came. He died at a sanatorium at 
Laurel, Md., where he had been under 
treatment for two weeks for a nervous 
breakdown, on July 23. 

Mr. Reynolds had been suffering for 
two days when his physician ordered 
that he go to the sanatorium so that he 
could have complete rest and be able to 
give up his many activities completely. 
He seemed to improve slightly, but 
pneumonia developed. His brother, G. 
H. Reynolds, was at his bedside when 
the end came. Mrs. Reynolds had just 
returned to Keyser because she herself 
was ill with the strain of attendance 
upon her husband. He is survived also 
by three sons, Francis Marion, Knight 
and Lester Reynolds. 

Mr. Reynolds, who was the son of 



Judge and Mrs. F. M. Reynolds, of 
Keyser, was fifty-one years old. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1891 and the year 
following was elected county prosecuting 
attorney, and in 1896 ho was re-elected, 
so efficiently did he administer the affairs 
for the state. He was named counsel 
for the Baltimore and Ohio about this 
time and continued in this capacity 
until the time of his death. He served 
the railroad most successfully through- 
out the Cumberland Division and many 
times was called into consultation at 
the general counsel's office in Baltimore. 
He also was attorney for the Central 
Railroad of New Jersey, the First Na- 
tional Bank of Keyser and a dozen or 
more influential business companies in 
his native state. 

Burial was at Queens Point Cemetery. 
The active pallbearers were V. F. Alkire, 
J. E. Leps, Dr. W. J. Koelz, Roy Warner, 
H. M. Wells and E. V. Romig. The 
honorary pallbearers were County Clerk 
J. V. Bell, J. C. Watson, W. McCullough 
Brown, of Oakland, Md., William M. Ken- 
nedy, of Baltimore, Md., and the members 
of the Mineral County Bar Association. 





13 



UNITED STATES RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION 

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR GENERAL OF RAILROADS 



GENERAL ORDER No. 40 

Washington, D. C, August 18, 1918 

To all employes in the railroad service of the United States : 

Complaints have reached me from time to time that employes are not treating 
the public with as much consideration and courtesy under Government control of 
the railroads as under private control. I do not know how much courtesy was 
accorded the public under private control, and I have no basis, therefore, for accu- 
rate comparison. I hope, however, that the reports of discourtesy under Government 
administration of the railroads are incorrect, or that they are at least confined to a 
relatively few cases. Whatever may be the merits of these complaints, they draw 
attention to a question which is of the utmost importance in the management of the 
railroads. 

For many years it was popularly believed that "the public be damned" policy 
was the policy of the railroads under private control. Such a policy is indefensible 
either under private control or Government control. It would be particularly inde- 
fensible under public control when railroad employes are the direct servants of the 
public. "The public be damned" policy will in no circumstances be tolerated on 
the railroads under Government control. Every employe of the railroad should take 
pride in serving the public courteously and efficiently. Courtesy costs nothing and 
when it is dispensed, it makes friends of the public and adds to the self-respect of 
the employe. 

My attention has also been called to the fact that employes have sometimes 
offered as an excuse for their own shortcomings, or as a justification for delayed 
trains or other difficulties the statement that "Uncle Sam is running the railroads 
now" or "These are McAdoo's orders," etc. Nothing could be more reprehensible 
than statements of this character, and nothing could be more hurtful to the success 
of the Railroad Administration or to the welfare of railroad employes themselves. 
No doubt, those who have made thsm have done so thoughtlessly in most instances, 
but the harm is just as great if a thing of this sort is done thoughtlessly as if it is 
done deliberately. 

There are many people who for partisan or selfish purposes wish Government 
operation of the railroads to be a failure. Every employe who is discourteous to the 
public or makes excuses or statements of the kind I have described, is helping these 
partisan or selfish interests to discredit Government control of railroads. 

Recently the wages of railroad employes were largely increased, involving an 
addition to railroad operating expenses of more than $475,000,000 per annum. In 
order to meet this increase, the public has been called upon to pay largely increased 
passenger and fr^^ight rates. The people have accepted this new burden cheerfully 
and patriotically. The least that every employe can do in return is to serve the 
public courteously, faithfully and efficiently. 

A great responsibility and duty rest upon the railroad employes of the United 
States. Upon their loyalty, efficiency and patriotism depends in large part America's 
success and the overthrow of the Kaiser and all that he represents. Let us not fail 
to measure up to our duty, and to the just demand of the public that railroad service 
shall not only be eflftcient, but that it shall always be courteously administered. 

W. G. McADOO, 

Director (leneral of Railroads. 



First Standardized U. S. Locomotive Comes 
to Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 




|HE Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
received the first of the group of 
locomotives built after a stand- 
ard pattern furnished by the 
United States Government. It is de- 
clared that the type represents a sum- 
mation of the best of conservative 
thought in American locomotive design. 
In the construction there were employed 
the best of the labor and fuel saving 
accessories. A glance at the photo- 
graphic reproduction of this big loco- 
motive on the opposite page will convince 
anyone that good lines were not entirely 
sacrificed for practicability. 

This initial locomotive of the stand- 
ardized type was completed at the 
Baldwin Locomotive Works in Phila- 
delphia and is now in service and giving 
a good account of itself. It is of the 
Mikado (2-8-2) type, carrying approxi- 
mately 55,000 pounds on each pair of 
driving wheels. The tractive force 
exerted is 54,600 pounds. There is 
nothing radically novel about the con- 
struction of this locomotive. The boiler 
has a conical wagon-top in the middle 
of the barrel. The boiler is fitted for 
coal burning and the combustion cham- 
ber has a length of twenty-four inches. 
A mechanical stoker and power operated 
fire door and grate shaker are installed. 

In arranging the cab special care was 
taken so that the locomotive could be 



most conveniently handled by the engine 
crew. The cab itself is of steel, lined 
with wood. The leading features of this 
standardized, locomotive are indicated 
in the following table: 

Type 2-8-2 

Service Freight. 

Cylinders 26 by 30 inches. 

Valves 14 inch piston. 

Valve gear Walschaert. 

Boiler, type Conical. 

Minimum diameter 78 inches. 

Working pressure 200 pounds. 

Firebox, size 84| by 114| inches. 

Grate area 66.7 square feet. 

Kind of fuel Soft coal. 

Tubes, number and diameter. . . .216 — 2| inches. 

Flues, number and diameter. . .40 — 5^ inches. 

Length 19 feet inches. 

Heating surface, firebox 259 square feet. 

Tubes and flues 3497 square feet. 

Arch tubes 27 square feet. 

Total, evaporation 3783 square feet. 

Superheating surface 882 square feet. 

Driving wheels, diameter 63 inches. 

Journals, main 11 by 13 inches. 

Journals, others 10 by 13 inches. 

Truck wheels, front, diameter 33 inches. 

Journals 6^ by 12 inches. 

Back, diameter 43 inches. 

Journals 9 by 14 inches. 

Weight on driving wheels 221,500 pounds. 

Total engine 290,800 pounds. 

Total engine and tender 463,000 pounds. 

Wheel base, driving 16 feet 9 inches. 

Total engine 36 feet 1 inch. 

Total engine and tender. . . .71 feet 4| inches. 
Tender wheels, diameter 33 inches. 

Journals 6 by 11 inches. 

Capacity, water 10,000 gallons . 

Capacity, fuel 16 tons. 



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I I II 

II 6 g 

i I **War Savings Stamps mark an epoch in our | j 

! j National Life.*' — Secretary McAdoo f | 

It 1 1 

i i i i 

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17 



Helping Conserve the Sugar 




IN ACCORD with the great necessity for the conservation of 
sugar and following the request of the United States Food 
Administration at Washington, the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad has discontinued the use of sugar bowls on the tables of 
the dining cars operated by it over the entire system. The proper 
proportion of sugar is now being served in sanitary paper bags. 

Because of the great demand for sugar by the Allies of the 
United States and the limi- 



be the limit that would be allowed any one guest. This plan 
was put into effect on August 1 . The request for this saving 
would not have been made if the Food Administration did not 
know the absolute necessity for such a measure. 

It is the earnest desire of E. V. Baugh, superintendent of din- 
ing cars, to assist the Government in every suggestion it makes 
for the conservation of foods. He has asked the hearty coopera- 
tion of every patron and he is getting it. It is only through 
the assistance of patrons that the desired result can be obtained. 



ted supply 
this country 
ing with us 
ern Front are 
luxuries, the 
Food Admin- 
found it 
have a sugar 
two pounds 
for each 
To reach this 
was figured 
lump or two 
loaf sugar, or 
ful of granu- 




available in 
if those fight- 
on the West- 
to have a few 
United States 
i s t r a t i o n 
necessary to 
allowance of 
per person 
ninety meals, 
average it 
that one large 
small ones of 
one teaspoon- 
lated, would 



Winners of Prize Contest on *^What I am 
Doing to Help Win the War'' 
are Announced 

N the May issue of the Employes Magazine announcement was made of a 
contest entitled ''What I am Doing to Help Win the War," in which the 
employes were invited to state how they are helping Uncle Sam throttle the 
Huns, who are trying to sweep liberty, both national and personal, from the 
earth. The response was most gratifying and the Editor wishes sincerely that he 
had the authority to declare every contestant a winner. But two had to be chosen, 
one the best, one the second best. The prize of ten dollars as a reward to the man 
who appears to be making the greatest sacrifices goes to P. M. Pennington, crossing 
watchnian, Cumberland, Md. 

The second prize of five dollars for the next best statement of sacrifices and 
methods of conservation goes to F. M. Kirkendall, assistant to chief delivery clerk, 
Dayton, Ohio. 

It must be remembered that these prizes were offered, not for a literary master- 
piece, but for a true statement of facts. The Editor is taking the liberty to publish 
the most worthy of the papers entered in the contest in this and the October issues 
of the Magazine and none will be found that contains a record of greater and more 
unusual sacrifices than that of Mr. Pennington. 



The Prize Winning Statements 
**What I am Doing to Help Win the War'' 

By P. M. Pennington 
Crossing Watchman, C. T. Department, Cumberland, Md. 

C In Service of Railroad Seven Years, Nine Months ) 



In the first place, Germany must be 
whipped until she is ready to acknowl- 
edge that she is the dirtiest nation on 
earth. It is up to the United States to 
make her see the error of her ways. 

What am I doing to help? I am too 
old to go to fight. I am already crippled. 
I have no boy old enough to go into the 
army. While some go to the army^ 
others must stay at home and do their 
best, or, as I heard one hallow say, ''our 
darndest." The railroads can play an 
important part and I do hope each and 



every employe of the dear old Baltimore 
and Ohio will strain a point to do '4iis 
darndest. " 

As I am one of the ''smallest potatoes, " 
and receive low wages, it was a great 
sacrifice for me to buy a Liberty bond, 
but I am proud to say I did so. I also 
subscribed my pay for one hour a week 
to the War Chest in my home city. I 
am doing all I can to save, and I waste 
nothing. I planted every inch of our 
back lot in vegetables. I mend my own 
shoos. 1 practise thrift and economy 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



and self - denial in 
every way I can. My 
children go bare- 
footed. We live as 
cheaply as possible 
and we eliminate all 
waste. I pay my 
war contribution to 
several different 
lodges, of which I am 
a member. My wife 
and children are 
members of the Red 
Cross. It takes a 
lot of self-denial, 
because of my mea- 
gre wages, to do 
these things, but I 
would rather make 
these sacrifices now 
than to see our 
dear old United 
States a slave to the 




p. M. PENNINGTON 



greed of Germany. 

Nearly ev^ry day 
is meatless and 
wheatless at our 
house. We are sav- 
ing with clothing as 
well as food. I cut 
shoe strings from the 
tops of worn out 
shoes. I and my 
family are not asham- 
ed these days to wear 
threadbare clothing. 
Anything to win the 
war. I'll do any- 
thing to make the 
dear old Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad a 
strong factor in help- 
ing to win the war; 
to make its history 
one we can all be 
proud of. 



**What I am Doing to Help Win the War'' 
By F. M. Kirkendall 

Assistant to Chief Delivery Clerk, Dayton, O. 

(In Service Two Years and Three Months) 



Napoleon said he defeated the Aus- 
trians because they didn't know the value 
of ten minutes. Blucher was ahead of 
schedule and his unexpected arrival 
turned the tide at Waterloo. Buell was 
ahead of schedule and gave to the Union 
cause a victory at Shiloh. Our troops 
are on the fields of France ahead of 
schedule, and the tide has turned in the 
world conflict. The writer is a d(3hvery 
clerk at the Baltimore and Ohio freight 
d(;pot , Dayton, Ohio, at a salary of sixty- 
hvo dollars per month. 

Ever since this war Ix^gan, I haw, b(^en 
ahead of schedule. Since July, 1917, I 
have worked six days of ten hours (^ach 
in every wvA)k. I have cn^dit over-time 
for eight full nights, eighteen rnghts 
until and sixt(H;n Sundays. I am 

paying for two fifty dollar J.ibeiiy bonds 
on th(; instalhnent plan through tli(^ 
Jialtirnon^ and Oliio. 1 hav(; jmrcliascd 
a Thrift Sl.'unf) book for niy wih; and each 



of my three children. I am contributing 
one dollar per month to the Red Cross. 

When shipments arrive at our depot 
for the aviation fields or munition plants, 
I never wait until the cashier sends a 
written notice, I immediately phone the 
consignee. Very often this material is 
delivered within a few hours of its arrival. 
By so doing I am putting a plane in the 
air and a shell on the field ahead of 
schedide. Devotion to a cause is not 
only manif(^st in labor and contribution, 
but also in personal sacrifice of neces- 
saries and pleasures. During this ])( riod 
I have not purchased a single drink, 
eitluM- soft or intoxicant. I have not 
eat(^n a dish of ice cream. I have not 
spent a dollar for tobacco. I have not 
purchascnl for my family the amount of 
Hour or nu^at that Hoover has allotted as 
my shai-(\ 1 nc^ver fnirchase an article 
of wearing ap{)ai'el that (contains wool. 
I never ridc^ in the street cars. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



21 




F. M. KIRKENDALL 



Every atom of energy and every pound 
of muscle, I am trying to convert into 
cash or combustibles — cash for the cause, 
and conbustibles for the Kaiser. If you 
have the dope on any one who has a 
bigger bit with an equivalent amount ot 
brains and income, I would like to know 
his pedigree and the color of his hair. 

□ □ 

Arnold Kennedy Severely- 
Wounded in France 

News has been received in Baltimore that 
J. Arnold Kennedy, for three years a clerk in 
the Baltimore and Ohio yards at Locust Point, 
has been severely wounded in battle in France. 
In a letter to his mother he shows the spirit 
that the American soldier is made of and which 
will be the ultimate cause of the success of the 
Allied arms. 

The loss of his leg is of minor importance to 
this hero, for in the body of his letter he states 
that he believes the war will be over soon. 
Such a brave lad means surely that the end of 
the war would come only when Germany is 
defeated and even in his hour of suffering he 
pictures victory for his fellow Americans. 

Private Kennedy, who is the son of John H. 
Kennedy, a Baltimore and Ohio engineer, 1259 
William Street, Baltimore, was drafted for 



military service in April, 1918. He was first 
sent to Camp Meade, in Maryland, where he 
remained for three weeks. He then was or- 
dered to Camp Upton, New York, and assigned 
to Company F, 109th Infantry. After a few 
days he was furloughed and came to Baltimore 
to visit his parents. That was the last time 
they saw him. On May 2 he sailed for France- 
The War Department notified the parents that 
Private Kennedy was wounded in the action of 
July 15. 

Here's the letter written by Private Kennedy 
and which shows the stuff of which he is made: 

Dear Mother: One of the very kind 
American Red Cross men sent a card 
to you from me, as follows: ''Please 
do not take any notice of what your 
boy writes; he is fine." Did you notice 
that one of the nurses just wrote that 
in there for me. 

We are treated fine in this hospital. 
Had ice cream and cake for dinner. 
When we landed here by train last 
night, I saw a sailor helping to carry 
in wounded soldiers and the first person 
I thought of was Howell. How is he 
these days? 

By the way, mother, I have not gotten 
any mail from you as yet. How is 
everybody in Baltimore, O. K., I guess. 
I will finish what I started to tell you. 
I was wounded, but do not worry. 
The only thing we have to do here is to 
eat, and, my, they do feed you. How 
are all the family? Tell them to write. 
I sent father a letter the other day. 
Did he get it? 

I think the war will be over soon and 
we will all come home, but just think of 
the poor fellows who will never come 
home. We are going to move out of here 
to a better place. If it can be any better 
than thij?, it is some place. I will 
write you as often as I can and you do 
the same. There is a band outside 
the hospital playing. I guess this is 
about all I can think of now. Lots of 
love to all at home and all my friends. 
Your ever affectionate son, 

Arnold. 

P. S. — Please excuse this writing, but 
it is hard to write from a bed. My leg 
is very bad; might have it taken off. 
Don't worry. 



''Barney" Metzger Taking Well-Earned Rest 
After Forty -four Years in Service 

By J. A. Clarkson 



OHEY miss ''Barney" around the 
hopper yards at Locust Point 
these clays. And . ''Barney" 
misses the old pals with whom he 
worked many, many years before he was 
retired a few weeks ago. After forty-four 
years with the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road, Bartholomew Metzger was pensioned 
and is now spending his remaining days 
at his pretty home at Lansdowne, on the 
Baltimore Division. 

"Barney" is as proud of his home as he 
is of his railroad record. Both are the 
product of his own toil. From the first 
days he entered the employ of the Balti- 
more and Ohio, in September, 1874, he 
was a conscientious and diligent employe. 
He purchased several lots in Lansdowne 
in 1889, when that little town was first 
conceived, and he had a dwelling built. 
It was destroyed by fire in 1892 and the 
owner saved little of the contents of the 
building. He was not discouraged. That 
never-give-up spirit was his dominant 
trait. Ho soon set to work and, himself, 
built the home he now occupies. It is a 
magnificent domicile and Mr. Metzger 
told me whon I called on him a few days 
ago that it was just as dear to him as th() 
palace of a king. No prof(^ssional (;ar- 
penter could have done a bettc^r job than 
he in the construction of this home. 

Mr. M(!tzger loves to talk of the ro- 
mance of the Baltimore and Ohio. 
Seat(!d u[)on th(^ p()n;h of his home, ho 
can dig deep })ack into his iiKMiiory and 
recall the days wh(;n h(; was t railing f long 
with (engine No. 101, one of tin; old 
Jloss Winans camc^l ba(iks. He knows 
th(; coal busin(!KS from top to bottoni 
and his njcolUrctions of hoiuo of th(; early 
d(!veloprn(;iiis of this Utulo on \\\o ni.il- 
road an; (\\ui(i inten.'st iiig. 



It was on April 8, 1853, that "Barney" 
first saw the light of day in Erie County, 
New York. He began railroading when 
very young, with the Erie Railroad at 
Erie Basin as yard brakeman. After 
working there awhile he went with 
a commission firm, buying and packing 
apples, which business brought him to 
Baltimore, when the old desire to railroad 
again took hold of him. He obtained a 
position with the Baltimore and Ohio 
as brakeman, with conductor John * 
Pauline, between Baltimore and Martins- 
burg. In 1876 he was transferred to the 
yard and after three months and four 
days was promoted to conductor, under 
Captain Gorsuch, who held the position 
as coal agent and yardmaster in the 
hopper yard. Mr. Metzger was assigned 
to engine No. 101, of the old camel back 
or Ross Winans type, with engineer John 
Disney, which position he held until 
May, 1886, when he was promoted to 
yardmaster, succeeding Millard Mantz, 
who had been promoted to supervisor 
of trains on the Valley Branch. 

In a reminiscent mood, Mr. Metzger 
will go back over the intervening years 
and recall how in those early days the 
entire coal shipment from Baltimore over 
the Baltimore and Ohio was handled 
through twelve privately owned coal 
j)iers. Tli(^ old style hoppc^r cars were 
in us(^ They were built with three 
pots, Mr. M(^tzgei- recalls, iuul after one 
pot was (Hni)t iecl, the (;ar had to be moved 
for the second pot, and again for the 
third. This nu^ant that every car of 
coal had to be shiftcnl three times. What 
a (;ontrast with tlu^ (oal shipment of 
today! A imgh ni(>clij»,nical contrivance 
rais(\s big cars now and emi)ti(^s many 
tons at one inov(;inent. Mr. Metzger 



22 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



25 



sion Building. Mr. Holbrook's selection for 
this work follows his long experience in express 
and traffic matters. He will also have charge 
of matters concerning the handling of mails by 
the carriers under Federal control. 



Auctioning Unclaimed Freight 

General Order No. 34 
Carriers subject to Federal control shall sell 
at public auction to the highest bidder, without 
advertisement, carload and less than carload 
non-perishable freight that has been refused or 
is unclaimed by consignee and has been on hand 
for a period of sixty days. The consignee, as 
described in the waybilling,- shall be given due 
notice by mail of the proposed sale. 

Perishable freight shall be sold whenever in 
the judgment of the agent or other representa- 
tive of the carrier it is necessary to do so, such 
reasonable effort being made to notify the con- 
signee as described in the waybilling as the 
circumstances will permit. 

The place of sale of both non-perishable and 
perishable freight shall be determined by the 
carrier. The net proceeds, if any, after de- 
ducting freight and other legitimate expenses, 
will be paid over to the owner on proof of owner- 
ship. 

W. G. McAdoo, 
Director General of Railroads. 



Tests of Scales and Cars 

Circular No. 13 
The duly authorized representatives of the 
Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce, 
with the scale-testing equipment, test weights, 
and testing apparatus of the Bureau of Stan- 
dards, shall have access to master track scales, 
track and other scales, and to test cars, owned 

i 



by the railroads, for the purpose of testing 
scales and calibrating test cars in order that 
the Bureau of Standards may obtain all neces- 
sary data and information upon which to reach 
a proper conclusion as to suitable specifications 
and tolerances for the various classes of scales 
and weighing devices when under test and when 
in practical operation, and as to suitable me- 
thods of testing scales and calibrating scale 
test cars and master track scales. 

All movements of the scale-testing equip- 
ments, test weights, and testing apparatus of 
the Bureau of Standards, with authorized 
attendants, made for the purpose of performing 
tests or calibrations in accordance with the 
terms of this order, shall be made free of charge 
by the railroads upon the request of represen- 
tatives of the Bureau on presentation of author- 
ized credentials. 

Reports of these tests and calibrations with 
recommendations shall be made by the Bureau 
of Standards to the interested railroads and 
regional directors, currently as the tests are 
made. 

C. R. Gray, 
Director, Division of Operation. 

Fuel Distributer Selected 

Circular No. 2 
Effective Jime 11, 1918, B. P. Phillippe is 
appointed fuel distributer of the Central Ad- 
visory Purchasing Committee, with head- 
quarters at room 614, Interstate Commerce 
Building, Washington, D. C. 

H. B. Spencer, 
Chairman Central Advisory 
Approved: Purchasing Committee. 

John Skelton Williams, 

Director f Division of 

Finance and Purchases. 



To the Men of the Railways 

uiioiijiiiiiiiiKi iiiiiiiniiiiii ciiiiiiiitiiiiciiii laiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiifiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiciii iiiiciiiiiiiiiiiioiiniifiiiiiciiiiiiii ciiiiii 

"To the men who run the railways of the country, whether they be 
managers or operative employes, let me say that the railways are the arteries 
of the nation's life and that upon them rests the immense responsibility of 
seeing to it that those arteries suffer no obstruction of any kind, no 
inefficiency or slackened power." — WOODROW WILSON, President 



From the Boys "Over There" 



This letter is from H. L. Tibbals, a former 
engineer, written to engineer Frank Edwards, 
South Chicago: 

Somewhere in France. 

June 15, 1918. 

Dear Frank: 

Just a line about our trip to France. I ex- 
pect to go up to the trenches soon and when I 
do will try and write something about it for 
the Magazine. Just sent you our little regi- 
ment paper, The Windy City Echo, and will 
try and get some pictures for the Magazine 
soon. Gee, tell them the one you sent in of 
me was taken ten yeirs ago. 

I will begin by saying that the Thirteenth 
Engineers' Railway was a volunteer outfit and 
was among the first American troops to land in 
France, and the first to see active service. We 
left Chicago July 21, 1917, and New York July 
23. Went up to Halifax Harbor, N. S., and 
laid in the harbor for just one week, and then 
one dark and foggy night slipped out and zig- 
zagged our way to England. We were twenty- 
one days making the trip to Liverpool, England, 
and never got off the boat. We did not stop 
long in England, but that was some week. We 
left Liverpool the same day we got there, of 
course, by rail, and we all had a good laugh 
at the style of the railroads. 

We landed in a big English training camp 
which the old Kaiser Bill dedicated a few years 
ago. We were there only a few days when we 
received orders to go to London for a big parade 
and i)assed in review of the King and Queen of 
England. We were the first foreign troops to 
march through London with arms. The King 
took US in liis front yard and gave us a nice 
litth; hinch. He isn't half so large as I sup- 
poscid a King would be. 

Then we went back to our camp and a few 
days later fof)k train for Soiithnmpton and that 
night were on a boat again and off for France. 
We zigzagged all afternoon and all night over 
to Havre, but never even saw one "sub" and, 
oh ! how glad I was. 

We stayed there until dark, wh(!n we took 
another f\mny litth? tr.'iin ff)r ('halons St. Marne 



just outside the war zone at that time. We 
stayed here for about two weeks and left for 
"Somewhere in France," and it is the bumest 
place to be called "Somewhere" that I ever saw. 
It is on a military railroad about fortj^-five 
miles long and only half of the road was double 
track. It was built by French engineers in 
fifty-three days. Just think, a railroad full of 
cuts, curves, fills, made in that time. And 
the engines, Frank; you should have seen them— 
almost beyond the military age. The one they 
use regularly was built in 1861, a little passen- 
ger engine, and some hog, but she was sure put 
together right, not a click or a pound in her 
anj^vhere, and set screws every place to keep 
her that way. 

This engine had three drivers on a side, no 
trailer or lead truck, but the drivers were about 
five feet high. She had an injector on the left 
side and one of those old style pumps on the 
right side that was connected to the valve stem. 
The sand lever was on the fireman's side. It 
was a big crank and as long as you turned it 
the sand would run. The cylinder cock lever 
was on the left side too, but the blower was on 
the right side away out in front of me. She 
had no brake except the little hand brake on 
the tank, so had to wind her up every time I 
wanted to stop, start ahead or back, for she 
had the old style screw reverse and half the 
time I would forget to latch it so that when I 
would give her steam the wheel would fly 
around a couple of times, always taking one 
of my pockets with it. 

Of course we had no lights and no bell, no 
pilots; just a couple of bumpers, and for draw 
bars we had a big hook, and for a cab, oh ! boy, 
you should have seen it. It was just a little 
buck board in front of the steam gauge. There 
was no place to sit. I got along very well with 
her; having only one bad wreck. Finall}' a 
few of the big new American engines came and 
I got the 44. She was an engine about the 
size of our 2700, but not like her, for she was 
built for the Fren(;h and had one of those cabs, 
I'd tell you what kiiul. but am afraid the censor 
would cut it out. I^ut she did have an up-to- 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



27 



date E. T. air brake, and as she was rather big 
I built a cab to suit mj^self. 

Very few cars have air on them, except the 
passenger or hospital trains, but a good engine 
brake was a Godsend to us. She had a long, 
narrow fire box, and we got the poorest slack 
coal you ever saw to burn in it, but the boys 
couldn't quit, so got along. We worked day 
and night trying to keep the game rolling; and 
did. 

The French and English engineers failed on 
this line and now after almost a year here the 
French won't let us go with the American army, 
and we feel rather proud over it, too. We got 
about 400 new men to fill up the regiment and 
that helped us out a lot, and we were getting a 
lot of rest, when they gave my company a new 
line to handle by itself, or rather a part of the 
old main line that had not been used since the 
war began. We do not run many trains so I 
asked to be an operator and got it. A much 
nicer and cleaner job. 

We run no trains at all during the day, or on 
clear nights, as the Germans can look right 
down the valley at us. So here I am an 
operator at the last station on the line; no, not 
the last one, but the last one we use, for the 

thing runs right into Berlin. I 

have never been up that far 5^et, would like to 
see the place, but will wait until all the boys 
go; it will be more fun then. 

My office is about seventy-five feet down in 
the ground in a bomb-proof cave, but from the 
holes these big ones make, do not think it 
would be bomb proof if one hit on top of it, 
and they have dropped all around it. 

I have been through lots of air raids and 
pulled trains through shell fire a few times, 
but got into the worst bombardment since I 
have been up here that I have seen since I hit 
France. Last week we had one that lasted 
forty-eight hours and they dropped one in every 
three minutes at this point. The cook wouldn't 
go out to cook the meals, and I don't blame him, 
for don't think any of us would have gone out 
after it if he had. I have a nice room in what 
is left of the old stone depot here, with a good 
feather bed and good springs, but haven't been 
sleeping in it very much of late. 

I don't know what you will think of this letter, 
but it is pretty hard to write with so many 
"don'ts" and I don't think I have said anything 
that will do any harm. Have told you all 
about the standard gauge road that I can so 
will try and say a few things about the little 
trench gauge road that takes stuff right up 
to the trenches. 

It runs right up the middle of our track a 
few miles each way, so I have to block them, 
too. The track is about twelve inches wide and 
all in sections, so.it can be taken up, put down 
or moved any time. The cars are just about 
like American cars, only a good deal smaller, 
but hold almost as much as the standard gauge 
car over here, for they are an all-steel car. 
The engines are little double engines with two 
fire boxes in the middle and a smoke stack on 
each end. The cab in the middle and the water 



tank sets over the boiler. Have some pictures 
coming and will send you one. These trench 
gauge trains at this time are handled by the 
French. 

I have told you about all the excitement, but 
it was mild to what I have seen lately. Every 
night the sky and country are almost as light 
as day, or any way a good deal brighter than 
the steel mills at South Chicago ever get. 
Think I told you who came over here a few 
months ago to take charge of our regiment's 
Y. M. C. A., any way it was none other than 
our old friend, R. R. Jenkins, from our Balti- 
more and Ohio Y. M. C. A. at Willard, Ohio, 
and he sure has made a big hit with the boys, 
for he is an all-around good fellow and then, 
toOj he is a railroad man, an old fireman. 

There are perhaps a lot of little stunts that 
I might tell you, but it wouldn't do now, but 
there is a day coming, and I don't think it very 
far off, when I will tell all. Well, my day's 
work is done, so if I can think of any more to- 
morrow, will jot it down. 

I see by the papers that America is sending 
boat after boat load of food over here and I 
guess our regiment must get all the beans, for 
we have them every night for a change— big 
beans, little beans, red beans, brown beans, 
white beans, and even black ones. But we eat 
them all, it seems to be a part of the "bit" we 
are doing over here, but haven't lost a pound 
yet. 

Frank, we have a fine bunch over here; we 
have a red-headed Irishman for yardmaster. 
He has no switchmen, does it all himself, and 
a cute little jackass for a switch engine. Our 
cook is a big Dutchman and can't be beat going 
to the cave when a raid is on. We also have 
a couple of Wops for sectionmen, and one gets 
ill every time one of the big ones drop close to 
us. There are fifteen of us in this detachment 
and it is funny to hear the talk at meal time 
of this big family. 

Frank, the people over here eat snails, and 
think they are good. I have been invited to 
a big snail supper a couple of times by some 
French and Italian non coms, but nothing doing. 
Can you beat that? There is a dandy air battle 
going on right over us, about six or seven rna- 
chines all mixed up. We are in hopes of seeing 
a couple of Boches come down soon, for they 
can't all get away and our fleet is the best by 
far. Gee, here comes another trench gauge, so 
will have to stop a few minutes. 

Back again. I forgot to tell you that these 
little engines were built by the Baldwin Loco- 
motive Company. I sent you an order for that 
smoking, but see now that you will not be able 
to send it even with an order, as they need all 
the room on the boats for food. Hope they 
don't use the room mv package would have 
taken for "BEANS." 

One thing I don't like about this part of the 

country; we have to wear these iron hats all 

the time and they are heavy and make our heads 
ache, and we also carry our gas masks with us 
all the time, but don't mind that. Will close, 
with best wishes for yourself and all my Balti- 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



28 

more and Ohio friends and tell them all to 
write. 

Howard L. Tibbals. 
Company D, 13th Engineers (R'y), 
A. E. F., via New York. 

□ □ 

The following is a letter from Private M. G. 
Denton, brother of H. L. Denton, General 
Superintendent of Police of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad. Private Denton, who is now 
in France with Battery F, 58th Artillery, Coast, 
Artillery Corps, formerly was employed at 
Locust Point in the office of agent Moore: 

We have been in this country sometime now, 
and during that time have seen some very 
strange and interesting sights; nothing like 
Broadway though, for the only bright light is 
the light of day, and after that is gone we are 
all asleep on our downy, soft wood floors. It 
is light until 9.30 o'clock and that is our 
bedtime. 

I believe I wrote you from the first place we 
were, but I have forgotten whether I did or not. 
There we were at an old French barracks and 
we had some amusement every night. One 
night a Boston Company gave ''Baby Mine" 
and there was an orchestra of Frenchmen who 
used to play for us, so the long evenings passed 
very well. We only stayed there a few days 
and everybody was glad of it, for it got very 
cold at night and we had only two blankets to 
keep us warm. 

One morning they put us on a train and 
brought us to this place. W^e had a fine oppor- 
tunity to see something of the country, and 
while the trip was long, one would have had to 
be blind not to enjoy it, for it is one beautiful 
country. We are now billeted in a little town 
and living right with the people, a few fellows 
in each house. We have a lot of fun trying to 
talk with them, and if it were not for our hands 
most of us would be gagged. They try to teach 
us the language, and in a couple of years I think 
we will be getting along very well with them. 

I think we are here to stay for a long time, 
and some of us may stay all the time, but if we 
do come home we will be better fitted for life 
than when we went from home. Last night 
three other fellows and myself took a walk to 
a chateau away up in th(! hills. From appear- 
ances it had not be(!n us(;d for several years, but 
it was the most beautiful place that I have ever 
seen. There was a caretaker there and he per- 
mitted us to go around the plac(\ 'J'here were 
all kinds of gardens anrl fountairjs about it and 



a beautiful lake. The road which leads to the 
place is about a mile long, with maple trees 
evenly spaced on both sides of it, and the view 
is marvelous. We have got to hand it to France 
for that kind of stuff, but in most ways they are 
about one himdred years behind. For instance, 
most of the farm work is done by hand, and the 
people wear wooden shoes, but the most pe- 
culiar thing is the way they use cows to pull 
carts, just as we use oxen in our country. 

The old U, S. A. is the only place and do not 
be afraid to "root" for it any time. When 
foreigners over there talk about their country, 
tell them they can go to Long Island City and 
live better than they ever did before they saw 
the Statue of Liberty. 

Believe me, the Red Cross and the Y. M. C. A. 
do great work, for they are everywhere that the 
soldier is and do a lot to add to our comfort. 
Your Brother, 

Private M. G. Denton. 
□ □ 

The following letter is from Sergeant Earl 
McDonald of Company B, 51st Engineers, who 
is now in France. For eight years he was rate 
and billing clerk at Shenandoah Junction, West 
Virginia. The letter was written to Mrs. E. 
G. McDonald, wife of the Baltimore and Ohio 
agent at Duffield, West Virginia: 

Mamma Dear — My stay here is proving more 
interesting every day and even though we can- 
not get out of camp, I haven't found it monot- 
onous or time hanging heavy on my hands. 
Funny, isn't it, that I don't get homesick? I've 
surprised myself a lot, but as you already know 
I have been using my cure for all ills — that is, 
to keep extremely busy at something, not worry, 
and then time never hangs heavy on my hands. 

Speaking of jobs, I've been censoring our mail 
for a day and a half now. Gosh, what a job, 
and we used up two blue pencils on it. Every- 
body writes when they arrive, and I was given 
the job for a while. This is only a rest camp. 
We will find our permanent location and go 
there some time soon, and they have me lined 
up as yardmaster. Haven't heard any guns 
booming yet. We are too far away for that. 

This country is beautiful, and every inch is 
under cultivation. American people don't 
know what a real war garden is, and what crops 
I have seen look the very best. ' Near the front, 
though, I suppose it is quite different. Our 
(•:imj) is in the country adjacent to a city of 
90,000 i)(;()pl('. The city has been built since 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



29 



the fourth century, and if I could get into it 
once I could spend a week there improving my 
knowledge of ancient history. There is a mag- 
nificent castle there that I saw coming in, but 
it is no doubt a factory now. The harbor brought 
my eyes wide open when we came in. The sight 
was wonderful, and to add the proper touch of 
beauty there was a himdred or more little sail- 
ing fishing vessels bobbing on the water with 
their brown sails like so many corks. 

The people here don't have to speak to show 
their gratefulness to us, they show the gratitude 
in their faces. Little youngsters running along 
side us in our hike here begging pennies and 
cigarettes, old women and old men waving, as 
we passed a school-house everyone got up and 
sang "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" in French. 
Then just as we roimded a corner we came upon 
a bimch of yoimgsters singing, "Hail, Hail, the 
Gang's all Here," in as good English as one 
would want to hear. One sees old women, girls 
and boys under twenty only. Old women carry 
loads for miles on their backs, a load lots 
heavier than my pack, which gets pretty heavy 
at times. Young boys, eight to twelve, do 
men's work, so do the girls. They all look 
drawn and stooped from it. Old women that 
look to be about ninety years old, go around 
picking up everything they see for fuel. French 
soldiers from the front that are permanently 
disabled, and oh ! lots of things. The stories I 
have heard back home about the inhuman treat- 
ment Germans give their enemies are nothing to 
what I've seen and heard, here. We have a 
number of U. S. soldiers here in camp, back from 
the front. I've talked to a lot, and with what 
little I've heard and seen, I do knoAv to be a fact. 
No wonder these people want to fight to the 
bitter end. Anyone would. I'd rather die a 
hundred deaths than see my people at home sub- 
jected to such atrocities. I feel that I am not 
making any sacrifice by going into this thing. 
I'm being given a privilege, and a great privi- 
lege, to do my share the best I can. 

V 

If " 

)! 

n 
n 
n 

H 

n 

li 

^. — 



But I'm only giving you the dark side. The 
bright side here is that everyone here smiles. 
The French people are wonderful. They bear 
whatever burden there is, orphan children, and 
husbandless wives all alike, they grin and bear 
it, and just hope for better days. They work 
all they can, all houses are well kept, and even 
though they do use every inch of groimd to grow 
something, there is plenty of vary colored 
posies aroimd their houses that brightens up 
things wonderfully, and you hear no grumbling 
from the French people. The people at home 
all through the United States have a lesson to 
learn. 

I'm glad I'm here to help, mamma. Of 
course, I'llmis-s you all more than you know, but 
I wouldn't be satisfied back home until its all 
over and peace reigns. I'm feeling fine in every 
way. The ocean trip M^as beneficial. I wish 
I could go into details, but really there is less 
danger crossing the ocean than in a 500 mile 
train ride for troops. I'm really getting stouter 
and hardened up. We get equally as good food 
here as in the United States. The camp is as 
good as any in the United States and we are 
living in stone barracks centuries old, and have 
cots, have good United States meat and good 
white bread. Butter sells for ninety-six cents 
a poimd, eggs eight cents each. 

I almost forgot to tell you — you and every- 
one else in the States have heard of the French 
ladies' remarkable beauty, but I haven't seen 
any real beauty yet. Several girls and women 
from town have a store here in camp. I hap- 
pened to buy something there the other day, 
and one of the girls spoke excellent English, so 
I go down occasionally of an evening, hang over 
the counter, and gas with the little French girl. 
She seems to be very refined and well educated, 
but darned if I know her name. The "Y" puts 
on good attractions here, too. I'll have to read 
this over and censor it to make sure I haven't 
said anything. Very best Oi" love. 

Earl. 



ALWAYS THOROUGHLY IN EARNEST j | 

WHATEVER 1 HAVE TRIED TO DO IN LIFE, I HAVE TRIED WITH ALL MY I ) 

HEART TO DO WELL; WHATEVER I HAVE DEVOTED MYSELF TO, I HAVE I : 

DEVOTED MYSELF TO COMPLETELY; IN GREAT AIMS AND IN SMALL, I | ( 

HAVE ALWAYS BEEN THOROUGHLY IN EARNEST f ( 

DICKENS I / 



I 



News of The Veterans' Association 



The Veterans' Association of Pittsburgh held 
its anniversary meeting in the Odd Fellows' 
Hall, Hazelwood, Monday evening, July 8. 
The meeting was followed by an entertainment 
which was enjoyed by a large audience, com- 
posed mainly of Baltimore and Ohio employes 
and their families. The railroad orchestra 
furnished the music for the evening and 
opened the entertainment with the national 
anthem. President William C. Cox gave a 
short address and then turned the meeting over 
to chairman C. A. Richardson, who gave an 
interesting talk on the organization and its 
purposes, and again called on President Cox, 
who related several instances which occurred 
during his fifty-tour years' service. The Balti- 
more and Ohio Choral Union rendered several 
selections. 

George W. Sturmcr, of Baltimore, was the 
next speaker. He spoke on the growth and 
progress of the organization, which now boasts 
of a big membership. Mr. Sturmer also told of 
his five years' service as a cadet in the Prussian 
army and explained the despicable militarism 
of Germany. 

Miss Jennie Smith, the Baltimore and Ohio 
Evangelist, spoke of her travels over the 
country and recited many personal experiences. 
Miss Jane Lear gave a recitation and Mrs. 
ShafTor sang "Pm Traveling on the Hallelujah 
Line." Mrs. Price and Mrs. Ertzman, mem- 
bers of the local Red Cross, were then intro- 
duced and raffled off a cake, which netted 
$45.60, the money going to the Red Cross fund. 
This amount was later raised $5.00 more by the 
sale of ice cream which had been left over from 
the supply of refreshments, making the total 
money raised for the Red Cross $50.00. 

C. B. Gorsuch, acting superintendent of tin; 
Pittsburgh Division, was then called upon for 
a short address. P. J. Harrigan, of Connells- 
vilh;, was the next speaker. 

On July 20 the Martinsburg Association of 
tlie ]ialt irrioH! and Ohio Vet(!ran EinployciS held 
its semi-annual meeting in the Y. M. C. A. 



President Z. T. Brantner presided. After the 
singing of several hymns, Dr. Chamberlain 
offered prayer, asking God's blessing on the 
great country of which all are a part. 

President Brantner introduced George W. 
Sturm.er as the speaker of the evening. Mr. 
Sturmer made a splendid patriotic address. He 
spoke of the great war, loyalty and efficient 
workers. The Baltimore and Ohio, he said, 
is a great and wonderful factor in aiding the 
country in its time of need. Mr. Sturmer' s 
address held the attention of his audience 
throughout. Rev. Dr. W. F. Gruver, pastor 
of the First United Brethren Church, made a 
brief address, after which refreshments were 
served. 

Two hundred and fifty members of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Veterans' Association at Pitts- 
burgh and guests, including many women, 
attended the first anniversary meeting of Hazel- 
wood. Although this association is a young 
one, its members are much "younger" as far 
as service with the Baltimore and Ohio is con- 
cerned, for each one of them must have seen at 
least twenty years' service on that System 
before being eligible to membership, but not 
more than two hundred have so far identified 
themselves with the association, which is looked 
after by George W. Sturmer of Baltimore, Md., 
attached to the general offices of the System 
and assigned to organizing the veterans. 

There was a short business session, and for 
two hours there was a good time for everybody, 
refreshments being served. C. A. Richardson, 
who keeps things moving around the Water 
Street Terminal yards, was master of cere- 
monies, and there was no formal program. Mr. 
Richardson, by reason of his long service and 
wide acquaintance among the veterans, calling 
upon them for short talks during the evening. 
The principal address was made by Miss Jennie 
Smith, the Baltimore and Ohio evangelist, 
(ieorge N. Orbin, secretary of the association, 
also spoke. Music, bot h insi rument al and vocal, 
was a feature of the evening's entertainment. 





CHANGES AND PROMOTIONS 



Grain Elevators 

|Y order of M. H. Cahill, general 
superintendent of the Maryland 
District, J. A. Peterson was 
named superintendent of grain 
elevators in Baltimore. The elevators of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and 
the Western Maryland Railway have 
been consolidated under the Federal 
administration and Mr. Peterson will 
have jurisdiction over millions of dollars 
worth of property belonging to the two 
railroads enteiing the Maryland city. 

J. H. Warren was named assistant 
superintendent of elevators at the same 
time Mr. Peterson was appointed super- 
intendent. 

Maintenance of Way 

Earl Stimson, who was engineer main- 
tenance of way for the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad, has been appointed gen- 
eral superintendent maintenance of way 
and structures by R. N. Begien, assistant 
to Federal Manager (operating). His 
headquarters will be at Baltimore. 

J. B. Myers has been named engineer 
maintenance of way of the Eastern Lines 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad by S. 
Ennes, general manager. Mr. Myers will 
have his offices in Baltimore. 

Traffic Department 

Archibald Fries, traffic manager, an- 
nounced the following appointments, 
which are now effective: 

D. G. Gray to be freight traffic mana- 
ger. 



H. M. Matthews to be coal traffic 
manager. 

W. B. Calloway to be passenger traffic 
manager. 

All these officials will have their 
h^eadquarters in Baltimore. 

Golder Shumate, general freight agent, 
announced the following appointments 
with the approval of Mr. Gray: 

W. F. Richardson, assistant general 
freight agent, Philadelphia, Pa. Balti- 
more and Ohio territory — Philadelphia, 
inclusive, to Bay View, exclusive. 

George S. Harlan, division freight agent, 
Baltimore. 

T. H. Fee, division freight agent, Bal- 
timore, Baltimore and Ohio territory — 
Bay View, inclusive, to Martinsburg, ex- 
clusive, including Shenandoah Division. 
Western Maryland territory — Baltimore 
to Gettysburg and Union Bridge, both 
exclusive. 

W. S. Yeats, division freight agent, 
Hagerstown. Baltimore and Ohio terri- 
tory — Weverton, exclusive, to Hagers- 
town, inclusive. Western Maryland ter- 
ritory — Gettysburg and Union Bridge, 
both inclusive, to Virginia Avenue, Cum- 
berland, exclusive, including Shippens- 
burg. Cumberland Valley territory — all 
lines, excluding Winchester. Philadel- 
phia & Reading territory — between Ship- 
pensburg and P. H. & P. Junction 
(Harrisburg), Carlisle and Gettysburg. 

J. L. Hayes, division freight agent, 
Cumberland, Md. Baltimore & Ohio 



31 



32 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



territory — Martinsburg to Grafton, both 
exclusive. Connellsville Division, Cum- 
berland to Hyndman, exclusive. Western 
Maryland territory — Virginia Avenue, 
Cumberland, to Frostburg, Lonaconing 
and West Virginia Central Junction, in- 
clusive, Cumberland and Pennsylvania 
territory — all points. 

H. H. Marsh, division freight agent, 
Grafton, W. Va. Baltimore and Ohio 
territory — Grafton to, but not including, 
Montana, Moundsville, New Martins- 
ville, Parkersburg, Weston, Buckhannon, 
but including Behngton. 

S. J. Lamoreux, division freight agent, 
Charleston, W. Va. Western Maryland 
territory — West Virginia Central Junc- 
tion, exclusive, to Belington, exclusive. 
Coal and Coke territory — all points ex- 
cept Belington. Baltimore and Ohio 
territory — south of McPelah Junction to 
Pickens and Richwood, inclusive. 

W. E. Lowes, general passenger agent, 
with the approval of Mr. Calloway, 
announced the following appointments in 
the Passenger Department and effective 
after July 1 : 

J. P. Taggart, assistant general 
passenger agent, headquarters Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. Territorial assignment : Bal- 
timore and Ohio Railroad — west of and 
including Connellsville, Pa., and Grafton, 
W. Va. Coal and Coke Railway. Wheel- 
ing Terminal Railway. Western Mary- 
land Railway, west of Thomas, W. Va. 

J. B. Scott, eastern passenger agent, 
headquarters New York City. Territo- 
rial assignment: district east of Phila- 
d(^lphia, Pa. 

R. C. Haase, district passenger agent, 
h(;adquarters Philadelphia, Pa. Territo- 
rial assignment: Philadelphia, and Phila- 
delphia Division to and including Aikin, 
Md. 

H. H. Taggart, district passenger 
agent, h(;adquarters Baltimore, Md. 
T(;rritorial assignment: Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad — Aikin, Md., to but not 
including Washington Junction and Fred- 
(;rick. Western Maryland Railway — 
Baltimore to but not inchiding Hanover, 
Pa., and Thurmont, Md. 

F. J{. Dar])y, district passenger agent, 



headquarters Hagerstown, Md. Terri- 
torial assignment: Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad — Frederick via Washington 
Junction to but not including Hancock, 
Md.; and Harper's Ferry to Strasburg, 
Va. Western Maryland Railway — Han- 
over, Pa., and Thurmont, Md., to but 
not including Hancock. Cumberland 
Valley Railroad and branches. 

W. W. Picking, district passenger agent, 
headquarters Cumberland, Md. Terri- 
torial assignment: Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad — Hancock, Md., to Johnstown, 
Pa.; to but not including Connellsville, 
Pa.; to but not including Grafton, W.Va., 
and all tributary branches. Western 
Maryland Railway — Hancock, Md., to 
but not including Connellsville, Pa.; and 
Cumberland, Md., to Thomas, W. Va. 
Cumberland and Pennsylvania Railroad. 

C. J. Proudfoot, district passenger 
agent, headquarters Grafton, W. Va. 
Territorial assignment: Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad — Grafton, W. Va., to 
Clarksburg, W. Va., and lines south there- 
of. Coal and Coke Railway. Western 
Maryland Railway — Thomas to Elkins, 
W. Va., Belington to Huttonsville and 
Durbin, W. Va. Reports to assistant 
general passenger agent, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Charleston Division 

W. Trapnell was appointed, on July 1, 
superintendent of the Charleston Divi- 
sion, with headquarters at Gassaway, 
W. Va. 

W. Trapnell 

W. Trapnell entered railroad service 
on the A. T. and S. F. in 1898. He came 
to the Baltimore and Ohio in 1901 in 
the Engineering Department in charge of 
building the thiixl track from Rowles- 
burg to Rodemer. He was appointed to 
assistant engineer between -^'umberland 
and Philadelphia and later to division 
engineer over lines between Philadelphia 
and Baltimore. He resigned from the 
Baltimore and Ohio in 1909 and built 
and operated the Hampshire Southern 
Railroad, which was taken over by the 
Baltimore and Ohio in 1914. He then 
was made assistant superintendent on the 
( hun})erland Division and next appointed 
district engineer maintenance of way 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



33 



of West Virginia District. Mr. Trapnell 
resigned this position in March, 1917, to 
accept the position of superintendent of 
the Coal and Coke Railway, in charge 
of operations, maintenance and purchases 
and held this position until the Coal and 
Coke was taken over by the Baltimore 
and Ohio. Next, he was appointed to 
his present position. 

Office of Federal Manager 

Separate annual and trip passes good 
over the Western Maryland Railway, 
Cumberland Valley Railroad and Cum- 
berland and Pennsylvania Railroad will 
be issued the same as heretofore. Re- 
quests for passes over these roads other 
than those issued by the division officers 
will be handled by the ♦Pass Bureau, 
Baltimore and Ohio Building, Baltimore, 
Md. Baltimore and Ohio passes, both 
annual and trip, will be valid for passage 
over the Charleston Division, formerly 
known as the Coal and Coke Railway. 
Annual passes good over theWestern Lines 
will be valid for passage over the New 
Castle and Cleveland Divisions. Annual 
passes good over the Eastern Lines will 
remain good for transportation over the 
New Castle and Cleveland Divisions 
of the Western Lines. Card and trip 
passes issued over the fac-simile signa- 
tures of either of the Federal Managers 
will be good over the Baltimore and Ohio 
System. 

The Wheeling Terminal Railway, Mar- 
tins Ferry, Ohio, to Bellaire Bridge, W.Va., 
and branches, will be operated as a part 
of the Wheeling Division, and the officers 
and employes will report to the super- 
intendent of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad at WheeUng, W. Va. 

Effective August 1, W. A. Shropshire 
was appointed division freight agent at 
Hagerstown, Md. (temporary headquar- 
ters, Chambersburg, Pa.), in place of 
W. S. Yeatts, who has been transferred 
to Regional Director's office, United 
States Railroad Administration, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

J. J. Swartzback has been appointed 
assistant superintendent, Baltimore Divi- 
sion, with headquarters at Baltimore, Md. 



Western Lines 

Engineers' Department 

With the approval of C. W. Galloway, 
Federal Manager of the Western Lines, 
L. G. Curtis, chief engineer, announces 
the following appointments, with head- 
quarters in Cincinnati: 

A. H. Griffith, engineer of construc- 
tion. 

A. B. Scowden, engineer of bridges. 
L. P. Kimball, engineer of buildings. 
E. T. Ambach, engineer of signals. 
E. Southerington, chief draughtsman. 

Toledo Division 

J. W. Kelley, Jr., has been appointed 
assistant superintendent, Toledo Divi- 
sion, vice E. J. Correll, transferred. 

E. J. Correll is appointed division 
engineer, Toledo Division, vice F. J. 
Parrish, assigned to other duties. 

Effective July 1 the Dayton and 
Union Railroad is operated as a part of 
the Toledo Division of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad. Officers and employes 
must report to superintendent at Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

New Castle Division 

M. A. Gleeson has been appointed 
master mechanic. New Castle Division, 
vice A. H. Hodges, transferred. 

L. W. Strayer has been appointed 
division engineer, New Castle Division, 
vice D. W. Cronin, deceased. 

Indiana Division 

J. E. Hudson has been appointed 
relief agent, headquarters North Ver- 
non, Indiana. 

B. H. Fennimore was appointed agent 
at North Bend, Ohio, vice W. W. Breeden, 
transferred. 

General superintendent F. B. Mitchell 
has announced that the Cincinnati ter- 
minals will embrace the territory between 
Oakley and Sedamsville, inclusive, on 
the Indiana Division, and Cincinnati and 
Glendale, inclusive, on the Toledo Di- 
vision. J. H. Meyers has been appointed 
superintendent of terminals with ofiice 
at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

C. J. Cleary has been apointed train- 
master, with office at Cincinnati, Ohio. 



34 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



A. P. Berg has been appointed road 
foreman of engines, Pittsburgh terminals, 
with headquarters at Pittsburgh, Pa., 
vice E. J. Langhurst, resigned. 

A. H. Hodges has been appointed 
division master mechanic, with head- 



quarters at Glenwood, Pa., vice A. L. 
Brown, resigned. 

J. E. McAvoy has been appointed 
road foreman of engines, with headquar- 
ters at Foxburg, Pa., vice D. B. Fawcett, 
transferred. 



□ □ □ 



Lieutenant Frederick W. Forshey Has Gained 
the Title of Sea-Pilot Because of Ducking 



fY^IEUTENANT FREDERICK W. 

Lf FORSHEY, former soHciting 
jT^^ agent under Edward Hart, Jr., W. 

F. G. A. at St. Louis, Mo., is vaH- 
antly preparing to attack the German 
airmen and a httle ducking he got a short 
time ago when flying over the Gulf of 
Mexico gives him more courage than 
ever. The accompanying photograph 
shows Lieutenant Forshey 's machine just 
after it had been swept up to the beach 
and he declares that he was not intimi- 
dated by the accident which plunged him- 
self and his companion into the water. 

When Lieutenant Forshey was fur- 
loughed for military duty, he entered the 
Signal Corps Aviation School and was 
assigned to Ellington Field, Houston, 
Texas. He tackled his new job with 
that same vim that made him a valu- 
able raih'oad man. Nothing daunted 
him. He soon learned all tho, fan(!y air- 
spins and won connnc^ndation for his dar- 
ing in the regions closer to the clouds 
than vA'd we here on earth. 

'i'licni's on(^ thing that gjuives lam, 
though, and that is that he has b(;en 
given the title of 'SS(>a-Pilot. " No 
aviator likes that tith^, but th(^ oi\u)r 
aviators confer it upon him wh(;n he 
takes an uuwilhng dive into the waters 
ber)(;ath him. Froin th(; phol()grai)h it 
can Ik; see n that Li(;utenan1 Iu)rsh(!y and 
his companions ai(; making every effort to 
extricate hiiri nwd th(; niachirn^ from tlu; 
( rnbarrassing position irilo vvfiich llicy 
liavc- gotten. 



In describing the fall, Lieutenent 
Forshey wrote as follows to Mr. Hart: 

'^Dear Mr. Hart: I am enclosing some 
pictures taken a few minutes after I had 
the misfortune to fall in the Gulf of 
Mexico at Galveston at 5 p. m., May 6. 
Lieutenant Nordeen and I were in the 
vicinity of that city when it became 
necessary to land. He made a fine 
landing on the east beach and in taking 
off we got into the trouble. A bad patch, 
or pocket, of air confronted us just as we 
left mother earth and after getting out 
about fifty feet over the water, the trim 
little ship just toppled over on her side, 
slipped into a semi-nose dive and we 
struck the water just where it was un- 
comfortably deep. 

''These big Curtis planes, however, 
will float for six hours, so we were com- 
paratively safe, as the tide came along 
about that time and washed us up on 
the beach. It was a very narrow escape, 
and I don't want anotluM-. We are now 
nick-nanuHl at the field 'Sea-Pilots.' 
We don't like the name, })ut it's th(^ price 
you hav(^ to pay foi- gcttingjnto such a 
mix-up. TIk; airship was littk; damaged, 
thank go()dn(\ss, and we were both im- 
hui t, although pietty well shaken up and 
a bit scared. 

"Trusting the pictui'es intc^rest you 
and that you will find* a little thne to 
(hop nu; a line t(^lling m(^ what is going 
on at the offi(!e, 1 i(>niain, 

" Your friend, 

FUV.U l'\)liSIIKY. " 



United States Needs Nurses at Once 



The announcement of the campaign to enroll 
25,000 young women in the United States 
Student Nurse Reserve, made by the office of 
the Surgeon General, the United States Public 
Health Service, the American Red Cross, and 
the Council of National Defense, has met with 
enthusiasm throughout the country. 

Although this drive, under the direction 
of the Woman's Committee, Coimcil of National 
Defense, did not begin until July 29, the state 
chairmen of the Women's Committee have made 
thorough plans for securing their full state 
quotas. 

A letter received at the headquarters of the 
Woman's Committee in Washington from the 
Massachusetts chairman says: "I feel that 
we have the matter already in hand, a reserve 
list of several himdred pupils to start with.". 
Indiana reports: ''We have worked out a very 
thorough campaign and are prepared to start 
the enrollment promptly." The Georgia chair- 
man writes: ''The interest in this state is 
apparent from letters already received," and 
from Maine comes the following: "There is 
much interest in the matter. It shows that it 
is one of the things needed at this time." The 
chairman of the Connecticut division expresses 
the enthusiasm of the women of her state: 
"We will need large supplies of cards and regis- 
tration blanks." The Mississippi chairman 
states: "I will take charge of the recruiting 
personally, and have made plans for the cam- 
paign." 

The Missouri chairman urges her local units 
to secure not less than twenty-five per cent, of 
the enrollment in excess of the Missouri quota, 
and in Nebraska the state chairman says she has 



already personally seen scores of candidates and 
is sure of the success of the drive in her state. 

The Surgeon General's Office, War Depart- 
ment, authorizes the following concerning the 
Army School of Nursing: 

Requirements for Admission 

Age. — Applicants must be women from 21 to 
35 years of age (unmarried). 

Education. — Applicants must have had high- 
school education or its equivalent. 

Length of course. — Three years. Credit up 
to nine months will be allowed college women 
having had prescribed sciences. 

Curriculum. — Training in medical and sur- 
gical nursing, including the nursing of patients 
with mental and communicable diseases, will 
be given in the military hospitals. Training 
in gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, and 
public-health nursing will be given in affiliated 
civil hospitals. 

Vacations. — One month out of each year in 
the school. 

Result. — The best nursing care for our sol- 
diers. The best training for our patriotic 
young women. Eligibility for membership in 
the Army Nurse Corps as vacancies arise. For 
membership in the American Nurses' Associa- 
tion, National OrganizQ,tion for Public Health 
Nursing, and Red Cross Nursing Service. 
Eligibility for registration in any state, except 
that those students to whom credit for colle- 
giate work shall have been given will not be 
eligible for registration in those states requir- 
ing the full three years' course in a hospital. 

Apply to the Army School of Nursing, Sur- 
geon General's Office, Washington, D. C. 



i i i I 

1 1 Give up your luxuries that the Kaiser may be made 1 1 

j j to give up his ambitions j j 

11 ll 

□iiiriiii oiiiiiiiiiiiiainiiiijMiioiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiainiiiiiiiiiiiiaifiiiiiiMiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiniiiriniiiiiniianiiiniiiMaiiiiii iiiiiiainiiiiMiiioiniiiiiMiiuinniitiiiiaiiiinincnoiiniiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiDiniiiMniioiirniiiiiiiDiiiiintniioiNiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiaiDiiiirin iiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiia niiiicpfll 
I iiiMiuiiiiiniiniaiiiiiMiiiiiaiiiiiiiniiicnniiiiniioiriiiiinniruiiiiMininiiiiiiniiiiaHiniiiiniaiiMiiiiiiiiaiiiiitiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiian iiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiitiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiioii iiiriaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiriiiainiiiiniiiaiiiiitinmaiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiimnoiimiiwM^^I 



35 



Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of July, 1918, and to whom pensions 
have been granted : 



NAME 

Fenton, John T 

Metzger, Bartholomew 
Smith, William M . . . . 



LAST OCCUPATION DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Material Distributer . Stores i Ohio 



Yard Clerk C. T. 



Baltimore. 



Crossing Watchman . C. T Cumberland 



35 
44 
44 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll, contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1917 over $312,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 
those who had been honorably retired. 



The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,428,680.55. 



The following employes, after serving the Company faithfully, have died: 



NAME 


LAST OCCUPATION 


DEPART- 
MENT 


DIVISION 


DATE OP 
DEATH 


YEARS OP 
SERVICE 


Brant, Edwin C 




M. P.. 
C.T... 
C. T . 
M.of W. 

C. T .. 


Ohio 


June 27, 1918 
June 29, 1918. . 
July 1, 1918. . 
July 11, 1918. 
June 5, 1918 . 


45 • 

30 

23 

24 

20 


Sehl, Jacob 

Naggs, Joseph O 

Shannon, Michael 
Watson, George W. . . . 


Truckman 

Foreman 

Watchman 


Philadelphia. . . 
Cumberland. . . 
Connellsville. . 
Wheeling 




Home Dressmaker's 
Corner 



Courtesy "Pictorial Review" ^i^-. 
— v^^-T'^ ~^0fi5b== 




A Modish Waist With Tucked Front 



SiINCE cotton materials are so ex- 
pensive, silk is being used more 
extensively in the development 
of separate waists. A smart 
model for a separate waist is pictured 
here, the high turn-down collar being an 




A smart model for a simple waist which 
can have the neck finished with a high turn- 
down, or a draped collar. The front is 
laid in inch-wide tucks. 



attractive feature. The front of the 
waist is tucked, the back extending over 
the shoulders to form a yoke effect. Deep 
cuffs, with turn-overs, finish the one-piece 
sleeves. In medium size the waist re- 
quires 33^8 yards 36-inch material. 

Before trying to make the waist, look 
over the construction guide thoroughly. 
Then take . the front and turn hem in 
front at notches. Form tucks in front 
creasing on lines of slot perforations and 
stitch 1 inch from folded edges. Close 
under-arm and shoulder seams as notched. 

Now, face the collar and sew to collar- 
band as notched. Face collarband and 



ruRN-OOWN CO 



OUW-^-^CONSl RUCTION GUIDE TG30 




P^...,i.d A^,:i 30, 1907 ruRN-Ovr?,-^-^^/ 



sew to neck edge as notched with center- 
fronts and center-backs even. Large 
''O" perforation in collarband indicates 
center-front. 

To make the sleeve, first close seam 
as notched, then gather lower edge of cuff 
under on slot perforations, lap to small 
^'o" perforations and finish for closing; 
stitch upper edge to position. Sew turn- 
over to cuff as notched. Sew cuff to 



37 



38 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



sleeve as notched with small '^o" per- 
foration in cuff at seam of sleeve and 
bring the small '^o" perforation at lower 
edge of sleeve to the opening in cuff. Sew 
sleeve in armhole with notches and small 
'^o" perforations, even easing in. any ful- 
ness between notches. Hold the sleeve to- 
ward you when basting it in the armhole. 



This model is also very pretty with the 
neck cut in V-shape, finished with a 
draped collar. 

Pictorial Review Waist No. 7630. Sizes, 34 
to 44 inches bust. Price, 20 cents. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale by local 
agents. 




The Needleworker's Corner 



2^ 



Towels for Use in Guest Room in Cross 
Stitch and Other Embroidery 

By Katherine Mutterer 
Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



F towels it is impossible to have 
too many. Three pretty ones 
are shown here, all of the designs 
suitable to development in 
the usual embroid(^ry stitches that almost 
every woman knows how to make these 
days. Ooss-stitch lends itself to so 
many dainty color blendings that the 
first towel ilhistrated is sure to be favored. 
Th(;n th(; design is simple and can be 
done very quickly. A eleven idea is to 
have the cross-stitching done in colored 
cotton, carrying out the decorative 
scheme of the room in which the towel 
is used. Cross-stitch towels are much in 
vogue just now for guest chambers. 

Th(^ s(!Cond tow(;l is (!rril)roid(5r(Hl in a 
design planmHl to include a monogram 
or single U'AU^r, if desinid. Tho work is 
done in (;y(?let and rais(;d sal in stit(;}i, 
while the (ulgc; is finislu^d with a fancy 
scallop embroidered in buttonhok; stitch. 
Huckaback, or one of the; linen su}>stitutes 



used now that real linen is so scarce, is 
recommended for towels. 

Baskets, vases, etc., are always a 
charming decoration for guest towels and 
very reminiscent of all manner of quaint 
and charming old-fashioned house fur- 
nishings. A prim little horn of plenty 
frilled with tiny flowers worked in French 
knots and raised satin stitch never fails 
to add to the attractiveness of a room. 
If desired the flower petals could be 
w()rk(Hl in blue cotton. One French knot, 
made of one thread of yellow and one of 
black, used together, could form the 
ccmter of each flower. 

It is not a bit too early to begin talking 
about th(^ holidays, and because everyone 
is economizing and h(il])ing in th(^ essen- 
tial work of winning the war, personal 
gifts are to b(^ on a num) })ractica] scale 
than ever. Nothing is more ap])ropriate 
than, towels for presents, at any time of 
th(; year or u[)()n any occasion; hence 




THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



39 



simple, effective designs are in greater 
demand than ever. 

Pictorial Review Embroidery^ No. 12131. 
Transfer, blue, containing three different guest 
towels. Price, 15 cents. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale by local 
agents. 




THREE OF THE PRETTIEST OF TOWELS. PATTERN No. 12131 



Charming Silks and Crepes will be Made Up in Simplest 
Form for Fall Dresses 



By Maude Hall 



mHE chronicler of the doings of 
Dame Fashion must be a privi- 
l^^ljjl leged character, for it is only by 
P^^ ^ special favor that one is able to 
penetrate the great defenses of secrecy 
with which famous designers surround 
their creations for an advancing season. 
To have their ideas discounted before 
they are expressed in actual models is 
something against which the makers of 
fashion must protect themselves, for in 
the world of dress as in the woild of 
finance, ideas are money. 

It is no violation of confidence, how- 
ever, to say that simplicity will be the 
keynote of the coming season's styles, 
for eternal simplicity is the price of un- 
questioned smartness. Many of the 
frocks for early fall wear will be a sur- 
prise because of their material, for more 
than ever will the absence of wool be 
noted. Pure woolen fabrics are going 
to demand prices that are bcj^ond the 
average pocket book. 



In their place will be substituted 
charming silks and crepes, to say nothing 
of satins of sufficient weight to make 
them appropriate for wear very late 
in the autumn. Later the question of 
real winter materials will be solved, but 
there are many details yet under con- 
sideration. 

Well-dressed women are sure to like 
the new georgette satins. They may be 
used in the development of one-piece 
dresses for all-day wear and semi-tailleurs. 
They are heavy but soft and are guaran- 
teed not to roughen under continued 
usage. Quite a pretty model in Marne 
gray georgette satin is made in overdress 
effect. The foundation is of satin figured 
taffeta, made with a plain skirt and waist. 
The overdress closes on the left shoulder 
and has large armholes, the deep girdle 
being slipped under the back gore, leaving 
a panel effect. Fancy buttons trim the 
inserted pockets and the square neck has 
a collar of self-material. 



l_lf. H. TRANSI'OHTS AT SIOA. 2 -WO It KING 42.ni) DIVISION WAK CiAItDKN IN rKANCIO. a-SCKNK IN 

6-YANKI:E.S ACTUALLY GOING OVER THE TOP TO MEET THE HUNS. 0-TllE CAMI> BARBERS "OVER THE! 



40 







42 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Baltimore and Ohio Employes 

o c Magazine > <o ^ o 

i i 

I WiLUAM F. Braden, Editor 1 

I Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist i 

I George B. Luckey, Staff Photographer i 



Are You Firing A Shell? 

[ IP lEDERAL Manager A. W. Thomp- 
[ f J son announces in a circular, 
printed on another page, that for 
every five scoops of coal saved a 
shell can be landed in the German ranks. 
He points out that it is necessary to save 
coal every day in the year. It is vital 
war work, he points out, and Mr. Thomp- 
son figures it out to dollars and cents as 
compared with the costs of shells to de- 
feat the enemy of the world. 

What Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
man would not be willing to make a 
supreme sacrifice of his life to drop a 
bomb into the Hun ranks? This oppor- 
tunity is now knocking at our door. Coal 
conservation is the opportunity. Just 
think for a moment. A scoop of coal 
sav(jd nuums that four pounds of finished 
ste(;l is f)ro(hice(l; four pounds of ship 
plate; four pounds of gun steel; four 
pounds of shell steel. Five scoops of 
coal will make a three-inch shell, and 
land it in the ranks of the common 
cntoy. Waste five scoops of coal and 
we tak(; a shell away from our })rave 
Baltimon* and Ohio lads who an^ ''over 
then;" waiting for us to hand them a 
sh(;ll to send on towards I^erlin. 

We all have long(!(l for an opportunity 
to participate; actively in the gr(;at(;st 
flrama of tin; ag(;s. We at home; }iav(; 
cojriforf cfl oiirs('lv(;s with the fact tliat 
we .'trc too old, or loo young, or physicjiJly 



unable to shoulder a rifle and face the 
German armies. We boast of what we 
would do were we on the firing line. We 
condemn to the bottomless pit of hell 
the Hohenzollerns and the Hapsburgs. 
Here's the opportunity to carry our 
boast into effect. Save coal today. 
Save coal every day. Save coal all day. 
Send a shell from your coal pile right into 
the midst of the German army. Back 
up the man who is backing up Uncle Sam 
by backing up his guns. 



Send It to the Boys 

|HEN you finish with this number 
of the Magazine, and, in fact, 
all other numbers, place it in 
envelope and mail it to one of 
the men from your office, department 
or section of the road who is serving in 
the uniform of Uncle Sam. Put this 
obligation upon yourself to send each 
month the Magazine to one who, in the 
lonesome hours of camp life, will find in 
these pages much solace and enjoyment, 
reading of the men and women formerly 
his co-workers in the Baltimore and Ohio 
service. It means only a material ex- 
penditure of three cents and a few 
moments of labor, but consider the re- 
turns in joy and comfort to the foot- 
weary boy fighting for us over there or 
training in some cantonment over here. 

□ □ 



A Lesson From the Front 



|HKHE'S a convincing lesson for 
self-sacrifice in the interesting 
hotter from ''over there" printed 
on another i)age and written by 
Mr. Howard L. Tibbals, a former engi- 
neer on the Chicago Division. He tells 
of the troublesome little locomotives 
that h(^ and the other engineers and tivc- 
imm are called upon to manage in k(H'p- 
ing the boys in the trenches supplied 
with anunuruf ion. After a vivid de- 
s(;ription of this toy I'ailroad, he says: 
''W(^ work(Hl day and night ti*ying to 
keep the gainc lolling; and did." 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



43 



Mr. Tibbals is not loath to tackle a 
job, when necessity demands and so 
much is at stake, at any hour of the 
night or day. And he gets only $33.00 
a month, with no allowance for over- 
time, either. He has come to the reali- 
zation that the soldiers facing the Hun 
shrapnel, gas bombs and machine gun 
bullets must be kept supplied with 
ammunition, whether he gets any rest 
or not. Every time he goes out with his 
little train he is expecting that it will be 
his last trip if some well-directed German 
shell finds its mark. That's real sacrifice. 

What are we at home doing to back 
men like Mr. Tibbals? Are we making 
equal sacrifices and are we behind Uncle 
Sam right here in the United States? 
To win a war these days it is necessary 
to get behind the man behind the gun 
with every ounce of energy and we must 
not allow material chimeras to becloud 
our goal posts of loyalty. The huge 
railroad "game" in this country must 
be ''kept rolhng" in order that fellow- 



soldiers of Mr. Tibbals' stripe may have 
things just a little easier. They are our 
representatives on the frontier of free- 
dom. You and I cannot go for some 
reason or other to the fields of France, 
but our work is cut out for us here at 
home. 

□ □ 

Real Saving 

^TylT is a certainty that every man 
1 1 J and woman in the employ of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad is 
^ ^ * making some sacrifice to win 
the war. The ever-recurring slogan 
tugged by our Government is: ''Save!" 

We are all imbued with the spirit of 
saving. But there's one thing we must 
not forget. Save Yourself — from acci- 
dent. Many of us at the departure of 
some loved one for the front line of 
hberty have offered the warning: "Good 
luck; but take care of yourself! " Are we 
at home following the advice we so 
sincerely give others? 



n 



Are You a Friend of the Hun ? j 



OFFICE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT POLICE 



H 

n 

I 

j Every fire loss on the Baltimore and Ohio lines is a gain to the Kaiser I 

j j and his hordes. j 

/ Our road is a vital link in Uncle Sam's chain of auxiliaries, who are ! 

/ helping to win the war. | 

/ . . . . I 

j A building burned will, through loss of records, machinery or other 1 

j facilities, retard our progress and reduce our efficiency. 1 

: I 

( REMEMBER President Wilson's statement, "Preventable fire is worse | 

I than a private misfortune. It is a public dereliction." f 

i , . .1 

j Don't be an ally of the Kaiser. Help to prevent fire on our lines. 1 

) WRITE US! We will tell you how. | 



J . FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU 1 

(I I 



4i 




Baltimore Division 

W. R. Moeller, signal maintainer at Hale- 
thorpe, Md., while extra east, engine 4501, was 
passing, noticed front truck on car coming down. 
He notified conductor and train was stopped at 
Lansdo^^-ne. It was necessary for relief train 
to be called to repair the truck. He has been 
commended. 

On May 1, while advance section of train No. 13 
was passing tower at Barnesville, Md., operator 
E. E. Bowers notified Dickerson to stop the 
train at that point, where an examination de- 
veloped a steel truck dragging on an express car. 
In view of operator Bowers' close observance 
a commendatory entry has been placed on his 
service record. 

Philadelphia Division 

On July 12, extra cast, engine 4123, while 
passing Clayton Tower was observed by section 
foreman A. J. Budnick and signal foreman T. L. 
Sullivan, Iron door was broken and dragging 
on rail. The men signaled the crew to stoj). 
and the door was removed. Budnick and 
Sullivan were commended for their vigilance. 

On July 14 car inspector William M. Wisely 
discovered defective equipment on extra west 
4143 as it was passing Kiamensi, Del. The 
train was stoi)ped and the car was set off at 
Harmony, no doubt preventing a bad tie up. 

As extra 4275 east was passing Bradshaw, car 
in.si)ector (>. E. Dougherty noticed a car in 
bead of train having a broken wheel. He 
flagged train and also flagged a troop train 
whirli was following. 

Cumberland Division 

At fi.OO a. m., June 27, wliilc extra 4.SG4 west 
was paHsing Martinsburg, operator J. L. Schro- 
der noted wheels sliding under car. lie in- 
formed di.siKitcher, wlio liad exann'natioii made 
at West Cinnbo nnd brakes released. 



As extra 4834 west passed Green Spring at 
5.15 a. m. Jime 30, operator J. D. Rockwell, 
observed hot car box middle of train. Due to 
fog prevailing and feeling that it was not ob- 
served by crew, he notified conductor as caboose 
passed. Box was given attention west of tower. 

July 9, while extra 4836 west was passing 
Harper's Ferry, operator C. E. Marlatt noted 
something unusual about car in train. He 
notified the crew, who corrected the trouble. 

As extra 4152 west passed Hobbs at 6.30 p. m. 
July 29, operator Q. Hobbs noted defective 
equipment on car and notified crew on caboose, 
who stopped at Kearneysville and made repairs. 

Wheeling Division 

On Jime 2 at 3.30 a. m. operator \Y. S. Dunn 
discovered defective equipment on car extra 
2668 while passing J Tower, Bellaire, Ohio. 
Mr. 'Dumi took necessary action to prevent 
accident and commendation mark has been 
placed upon his record. 

On Jime 19 operator C. A. Shivlin, at Bridge- 
port, Ohio, discovered two defective caps in 
train of extra east, engines 2885 and 2615. A 
letter of thanks was sent to Mr. Shivlin by 
superintendent Smith and a commendation 
mark has been placed on his record. 

Brakeman C. A. Lester, on July 9, about 
12.35 p. m., discovered N. Y. C. car 327155 off 
center of train, extra 2524, while heading in 
siding at Maynard. Brakeman Lester was 
working on the local at that point and he made 
r(>i)ort of this and car was recentered. For 
his close observance a commendation inark 
has been placed on his record. 

Ohio River Division 

On July 7 conductor W. N. Jeffrey, in charge 
of (lain No. 1-81, discovered broken arch bar 
on a car, which was set out at Uhrichsville. 
lie li.is been cornnKMided by the sup(>rintendent . 



1^ 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



45 



On July 8 Mrs. Mae Peterman, assistant 
agent at BrookljTi, Ohio, discovered broken 
rail at east end of track 28, about three car 
lengths from east end of passing track switch, 
and immediately notified sectionmen, who had 
necessary repairs made. She has been com- 
mended. 

On July 11 Miss Grace Vaughn, caretaker at 
Vaughn station, discovered fire in wheat field 
near the station, started by sparks from an 
engine, and extinquished the blaze, thereby 
saving considerable loss of wheat, which is so 
badly needed at this time. She has been com- 
mended. 

On July 6 conductor E. G. Manson, in charge 
of train No. 2-82, engine 4246, while pulling 
through eastbound siding at Sterling, dis- 
covered a box car on east end of thirty-car 
track at Sterling on fire. He extinquished the 
blaze. He has been commended. 

On July 31 conductor F. Dernier, returning 
home to Grafton from Lorain on motor car, 
while waiting at Patterson siding for extra 4246 
west to pass, noticed very bad joint in track. 
After train had passed, examined joint and 
finding both splice bars broken and spikes loose, 
immediately notified sectionmen, who had 
necessary repairs made. 

Also after discovering the above proceeded 
to Grafton and when stopping to enter wye 
found wye switch gapping open about two 
inches with a brake shoe wedged between the 
joint and rail. With the assistance of agent at 
Grafton he removed brake shoe. He has been 
written a letter of commendation by the super- 
intendent. 

On June 20 the following employes, W. N, 
Jeffrey, conductor; J. E. Buckley, brakeman"; 
H. C. Grimes, brakeman; J. Weins, engineer; 
G. A. Guthrie, fireman, in charge of train with 
engine 4190 out of Willard, Ohio, while passing 
Lorain, Ashland and Southern Railway over- 
head trestle at Nova, Ohio, noticed same afire, 
stopped and put fire out. By doing this they 
not only saved trestle from serious damage, 
but at the same time prevented rails, ties, etc., 
dropping down on our tracks and obstructing 
traffic. 

They have been written letter of commen- 
dation by the superintendent and also commen- 
ded by Mr. W. D. Holliday, superintendent 
Lorain, Ashland and Southern Railway, for 
their interest and action taken in this instance. 



Connellsville Division 

On July 24 G. A. Mayfield, third trick opera- 
tor at Oriental, while walking home from Leith 
found a piece of wood and part of brake shoe 
head fastened in switch leading to the glass 
house track at Leith, near Uniontown, Pa., 
causing switch point to stand open about half an 
inch. Mr. Mayfield notified the proper authority 
and had the obstruction removed and switch 
spiked over. Mr. Mayfield has been com- 
mended. 

Pittsburgh Division 

On June 12 conductor W. C. Jones and engi- 
neer H. J. Brown, with engine 2649, discovered, 
while using head of switch at Reduction, Pa., 
that the switch had dropped open about an 
inch. He flagged No. 7 until they had the 
switch spiked. 

On June 5 engineer C. A. Reamer noticed 
the bridge just west of Evans City had been on 
fire and the rails were still hot. He notified 
dispatcher to have all eastbound trains stopped. 

Engineer C. E. Edinire noticed defective 
equipment on engine 2037 of train No. 48, 
July 10, and caused the train to be stopped after 
it started to pull out from the station at Mill- 
vale, Pa. While at Millvale station, when 
extra 2535 west pulled out, he observed a 
broken arch bar on the fifth car from the engine 
and caused this train to be stopped and car 
set off. Mr. Edinire was commended and 
notified that ''services of this character are 
very highly appreciated." 

Glenwood Shops 

Foreman Callahan should be commended for 
discovering trouble on engine 4196 while in 
back shops. The engine was in the shop for 
rimning repairs and while taking out striking 
points, he discovered a piston loose, which he 
had taken down. 

Machinist Collett, of the roundhouse, should 
be commended for discovering loose axle on 
engine 2146. 

Machinist P. W. Murphy, while passing 
through the yard, discovered a switch lever in 
upright position. He threw it into position. 

New Castle Division 

On July 18 William Salmon, fireman at Akron 
Junction, returning from assisting an eastbound 
freight, noticed defective rail at crossing at 



46 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



bridge east of BD Tower. He reported the 
matter and rail was repaired by sectionrnen. 

On July 20 operator IMcLaughlin, BD Tow- 
er, on his way to work discovered defective 
rail east of BD Tower, He notified proper 
officials and repairs were made. 

On the afternoon of July 18, B. W. Kile, at 
East Claridon, Ohio, discovered bridge 332-A 
on fire. He extinguished the blaze and re- 
ported it. This fire occurred after the sec- 
tionrnen had quit work for the day. A letter 
of thanks was sent to Mr. Kile by the super- 
intendent. 

Flagman C. G. Weeks, extra 4315 west, June 
18, found a guard rail torn out at Hennings 
Lumber Company's switch east of BD Tower, 
Akron Jimction. He reported to the proper 
officials. 

As extra 4242 east passed AY Tower, engi- 
neer F, H. Willard of pusher engine, on his way 
to work, discovered a brake beam down and 
notified the operator at BD. The train was 
stopped at XN and repairs made. On extra No. 
4038 east, Mr. Willard noticed a car door partly 
open, from which small pieces of lumber were 
falling. He notified the proper officials. 

C. L. Welty, engineer on No. 16, made a quick 
stop at Kent Ravenna road crossing, just east 
of Kent, when an automobile stalled upon the 
east main track. His quick action probably 
prevented loss of life or damage to the auto- 
mobile. 

While inspecting train of extra west 4034 July 
passing I5D Tower, 11. D. Lloyd found a 
brake l)eam down and adjusted same. 

On June 24, while extra 4211 east was pass- 
ing Nova, Ohio, operator J. J. Dieter noticed 
a car leaning very badly and notified D. T. 
Lloyd, who inspected the car and found both 
Ijcarings on one side gone. The car was side- 
tracked at Nova, and officials notified. 

Chicago Division 

W. A. ]iliin(;}i(Wt , operator, KiMirncIl, Ind., 
has been coi mendecl for discovering fire in a 
car which v.i ri set ofT at his station and taking 
action to ( x in/.uish the blaze. 

A. Quince, ; witch tender, Garre^, Ind., dis- 
covered defer-' ivo wheel on car handled in extra 



east, engine 4219, while pulling out of Garrett 
yard Jime 14, and took proper action to have 
car set out of train. 

Clyde Bauers, section foreman, Wellsboro, 
Ind., has been commended for assisting in 
cooling hot box on passenger train No. 15, June 
15. Mr. Bauers assisted in renewing brass and 
carrying water to cool journal. 

On July 2 operator J. B. Hays, when reporting 
for duty at Wolf Lake, discovered car door on 
westbound main track and removed it. 

H. E. Ringle, night clerk. Tiffin, Ohio, dis- 
covered defective equipment on a train while 
passing Tiffin, and immediately took action to 
have train stopped and defect remedied. He 
has been commended. 

Brakeman W. S. Hull discovered defective 
equipment in extra east, engine 4266, Syracuse, 
June 6, and took immediate steps to have car 
set out of train. He has been commended. 

Indiana Division 

On June 19 H. F. Cass, operator at Dillsboro, 
discovered defective equipment on car in extra 
2620 west , while train was passing his office . He 
attempted to stop the train but was unsuccess- 
ful and notified dispatcher and train crew at 
Cold Springs and necessary repairs were made. 

On Jime 20 operator Vawter, Delhi, Ohio, 
discovered defective equipment on car in No. 
94's train, being operated as extra 2546, while 
train was passing his office. He signalled con- 
ductor Fox and train was stoj)ped and repairs 
made. 

Illinois Division 

On July 12, about 5.30 p. m., crew of engine 
1569, working in Cone yard, observed a car 
on fire in Terminal Conlogue Yard. They 
immediately went to the scene and made a cut 
between the burning car and the one next to it, 
saving cars that might have been burning before 
a terminal engine could have arrived. Com- 
mendatory notations have been made on the 
records of foreman G. W. Hunt, engineer I. N. 
iiostwick and switchmen W. H. Fitzgerald and 
(1. H. Cox for their action in this matter. 
Foreman Hunt made the cut while the terminal 
crew, who arrived and made the cut at the other 
end of the burning car, left another car to be 
burned. This car was later chained up and 
pulled away from the burning car. 



Baseball Activities Among Employes 



Mt. Clare vs. Staten Island 

Holding the Staten Island team to six hits 
and two runs, the Mt. Clare baseball team 
collected twelve hits and nine runs when they 
met August 3. Andrews pitched a steady game 
for the winners and kept the hits garnered off 
his delivery well scattered. In the first two 
innings of play Mt. Clare put the game on ice, 
then came back in the eighth and counted four 
more times. Maul, Boland, Andrews and F. 
Smith did most of the slugging. Score: 



Mt Clare 


AB 


R 


BH 


PO 


A 


E 


Gribbin, 3b 


4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


Apple, lb 


. . 5 


1 


2 


13 








Caulder, ss 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


Maul, cf 


4 


1 


1 


1 








Boland, 2b 


4 


1 


3 


1 


G 





Eisenacher, rf 


2 








1 








Bloomfield, rf 


1 

















Eyerly, If 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 





Mahaney, c 


4 








6 








Andrews, p 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 





Totals 


36 


9 


12 


27 


14 


2 


New York 


AB 


R 


BH 


PO 


A 


E 


Hall, rf 


4 








2 








McCafTerty, ss 


4 





1 


1 


2 


1 


F. Smith, 2b 


4 


1 


1 





4 





Lyman, lb 


4 


1 


1 


12 








B. Smith, c 


4 








5 







Dolan, cf 


3 





1 


2 








Dougherty, 3b 


4 





2 


1 


3 





Hendrickson, If 


3 

















Canlon, p 


2 








1 


2 





Totals 


32 


2 


6 


24 


12 


1 



Mt. Clare 2 2000014 x— 9 

Staten Island. 01001000 0—2 

Two-base hits — Maul, Boland (2), Andi'ows, 
F. Smith. Stolen bases — Gribben, Boland, 
Apple, Caulder. Double plays— Eyerly to 
Mahaney. Base on balls — off Andrews, 9; off 
Canlon, 2. Struck out — by Andrews, 5; by 
Canlon, 5. Umpires — Wortman and Grimm. 



Baltimore vs. Mt. Clare 

The Mt. Clare championship team, under the 
able guidance of T. E. Beck, manager, nosed 
out the Baltimore Division team in a nip-and- 
tuck contest in Baltimore, the former securing 
five runs to the loser's four. It was the most 
interesting game played at the Westport 
groimds this season and it was not until the 
eighth inning that Mt. Clare could put the run 
over that copped the bacon. Schauffle, who 
relieved Evans, pitched airtight ball and had 
his rivals at his mercy throughout the contest. 
He allowed only two hits while he was on the 
mound. Caulder, Evans and Maul were the 
leaders with the bat. The winners, who are 
the champions of the Eastern Lines, are pre- 
paring for further conquests and trophies. 
Score: 



Mt. Clare 


AB 


R BH PO 


A 


E 


Gribbin, 3b 


4 





1 


2 


3 


1 


Eyerlv, rf 


3 





1 


1 








Dee, rf 


2 

















Caulder, ss 


4 


1 


2 


2 


3 





i\Iaul, cf 


4 





1 


1 








Apple, lb 


4 








9 










3 


1 


1 





2 





Boland, 2b . . 


3 


1 


1 


1 


4 





Mahaney, c 


3 


2 


2 


8 


1 





Evans, If and p 


3 





2 


3 


1 





Totals 


33 


5 


11 


27 


14 


1 


Baltimore Division 


AB 


R BH PO 


A 


E 


Martin, 3b 


3 


1 





1 


2 


1 


Stavlor, c 


4 


1 


2 


12 


2 





Moxlcy, ss 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 





Pace, If 


4 


1 


1 


3 








Burke, lb 


4 





2 


7 


1 


1 


lluhl, 2b 


3 











2 





Lapp, cf 


3 



















3 

















McGovern, p 


3 











2 





Totals 


30 


4 


6 


24 


11 


2 



Mt. Clare 1 3 000001 x— 5 

Baltimore Division 3 0100000 0—4 

47 



48 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 





GLENWOOD BASEBALL TEAM THAT MADE A RECORD 
Left to right: Top row, Gleaskman, Umpire; Reynolds, Shrope, White, Quillon, Mathos, Friel, Voltz ai.d 
Rush, Manager. Sitting, Nohilla, O'Malley, Gisbert, Hudson, Meehan, Seeney, Captain; "Joe" Cunniff, Mascot. 



Two-base hits— Maul, Burke. Stolen bases 
— Caulder. Double plays — Caulder to Apple; 
Evans to Boland. Left on bases — Mt. Clare, 9; 
Baltimore Division, 4. Base on balls — off 
Schauffle, 3; ofT McGovern, 4. Struck out — by 
Schauffle, 2; by McGovern, 12. Umpire— Hoo- 
ligan. 

Baltimore and Ohio Building 
vs. Staten Island 

The game on July 27 between the Baltimore 
and Ohio Central Building team, of Baltimore, 
and the Staten Island nine, ended in a wrangle 
at Alaska Park, Staten Island. The umpire 
forfeited the game to Staten Island in the eighth 
inning with the score tied, 1 to 1. The argu- 
ment arose over a decision at first base and the 
Baltimorcans refused to continue play. There 
is some excuse for the tense feeling of the ])layers, 
for the game was a tight one throughout, but 
wiser heads shouhl have prevaiicul and insisted 
that the game b(; continued, for th(!S(; days 
there is only one j)lace for fiehl battles, and 
that's "over therr;." 'J'he game was mark(!d 
by fast fielding on both sides, the of)posing 
[)itcher received good Hui)port. Canlon was 
very cfTective in the pinches and the Baltimore 
phiyers could do nothing with his slants. The 
feature play of the game was mad(! by Ilen- 
drickson, lie taking a catch ofT the left field 
\)U;:ic)u'.r fenc(; with one hand. Nf)t an (jrror 
was made by the Staten Island infield, Mc(Jaf- 



ferty . and Frank Smith accepting difficult 
chances at short and second, respectively. 
Score: 



Staten Island 


ab 


R 


BH PO 


A 


E 


E. Dolan, 3b 


3 








1 


2 





Blauth, rf 


3 













1 


McCafferty, ss 


3 







3 


6 





Doughtery, cf 


3 














1 


F. Smith, 2b 


3 





1 





5 





Hendrickson, If 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 





F. Dolan, lb 


2 





1 


14 








B. Smith, c 


3 








5 


2 





Canlon, p 


3 





1 





2 





De La Pena 




















Totals 


26 


1 


6 24 


18 


2 


Baltimore 


AB 


R 


BH 


ro 


A 


E 


Sterner, ss 


4 





1 


1 


4 


1 


Wheeler, 3b 


4 





1 


2 


2 





Scharf, If 


4 




1 











Bradley, cf 


3 








1 








McCulloiigli, 11) 


3 







8 






Brubaker, rf 


3 








1 








Vinci, 2b 


3 








2 


4 





Shelhan, c 


... 3 








1 


1 

























Totals 


27 


1 


4 


16 


12 


2 


Central Building 





1 - 


-1 


Staten Island 





10 


X - 


-1 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



49 



Glenwood vs. Cleveland 

Glenwood Shops team gave the nine from 
Cleveland an awful drubbing when they met 
at Glenwood August 4, the score being 14 to 2. 
O'Malley, another "Babe" Ruth, made a record 
when he clouted out another home run, adding 
to his long list. Gisbert and Meehan were the 
leaders with the bat, the former getting a three- 
bagger among his three hits and the latter 
having a two-bagger among his three bingles. 
Friel, the star catcher of the Glenwood team, 
was injured in the seventh imiing and retired 
from the game. O'Malley took his place. 
Captain Seaney played a star game and is one 
of the never-say-die kind of leaders. "Ham" 
White made several spectacular catches in the 
left garden, and was one of the leaders at the bat, 
getting three healthy hits, one of them a three- 
bagger. Voltz kept the four hits that his rivals 
registered well scattered and had the game in 
hand at all times. Score: 

Glenwood ab r bh po a e 

Gisbert, 3b 5 3 3 6 2 

Seaney, lb 5 2 1 6 

Meehan, 2b 5 3 3 3 1 

White, If 4 3 1 2 1 

Reynolds, ss 4 2 2 1 

Shrope, rf 1 

O'Malley, cf 4 12 10 

Friel, c 4 1 11 2 1 

Voltz, p 4 1 

Mathos, rf 1 

Totals 3G 14 13 27 9 3 

Cleveland ab r bh po a e 

Foscoe, 3b 2 10 110 

Morgan, If 4 2 2 

Chambers, ss 3 1 1 2 

Whitacre, lb 1 11 2 

Daley, cf 4 

Hopson, rf 4 1 

Marick, 2b 4 4 1 

Skidley, p 3 1 

Skidley, c 2 10 1 

Schuler, p 1 1 

Bernerski, c 1 

Totals 29 2 4 24 9 4 

Cleveland 0000002 0—2 

Glenwood 20020 1 63 x— 14 

Two-base hits — Meehan, White, Seaney, Rey- 
nolds, Morgan. Three-base hit — Gisbert. 
Home run — O'Malley. Stolen bases — Seaney, 
Meohan, 2; White, 2; O'Malley, Foscoe, Morgan, 



Chambers. Sacrifice hits — White, Reynolds, 
Shrope, 3. — Left on bases — Cleveland, 6; Glen- 
wood, 3. First base on errors — Cleveland, 1; 
Glenwood, 4. Base on balls — Voltz, 2. Hit 
by pitcher — by Voltz, 2. Struck out — by Skid- 
ley, 10; Voltz, 11. Umpires Glaseman and Mc- 
Bride. 

Glenwood vs. New Castle 

Glenwood defeated New Castle by the score 
of 11 to 6, which gave Glenwood the champion- 
ship of the Pennsylvania District. The Glen- 
wood team won the cup given by the general 
superintendent at Pittsburgh last year. 

White, Reynolds and Shrope led the Glen- 
wood team in hitting. White getting two hits, 
including a two-bagger and Shrope getting in 
a three-bagger, a two-bagger and a single in 
four trips to the plate. O'Malley caught his 
first game of the year for Glenwood, replacing 
Friel. He was in the game at all times and was 
a big factor in setting New Castle down. Gis- 
bert at third accepted six chances without an 
error and Meehan on second base accepted the 
same number without a slip up. ' ^ Jake' ' Mathos 
played his first game with the team at first 
base, in place of Captain Seeney, and gave a 
good account of himself, both in the field and 
at bat. 

Iron Man John Voltz was on the mound and 
as soon as New Castle saw "Johnny" mounting 
the rubber they knew it was all off with them, 
as John sure has their number. He made good 
by striking out ten of the Newcastle members. 
Glenwood would have played an errorless 
game only for a slight mix up by the first base- 
man, but the play was a hard one and of course 
it is to be overlooked. Never mind Jake, we 
know it will not happen again for a long time. 

Irwin and Battley were the hard hitters for 
New Castle, each getting three hits. Meehan 
was here, there and everywhere as was all the 
members on the Glenwood team. Meehan 
sure has the toe slide down fine. Score: 

Glenwood ab r bh po a e 

Gisbert, 3b 5 1 1 2 4 

Meehan, 2b 4 2 1 4 2 

Mathos, lb 4 2 1 4 1 

White, If 4 2 1 1 

Reynolds, ss 5 2 2 3 1 

Shrope, cf.. . 3 13 10 

Quillan, rf 2 1 1 

O'Malley, c 3 1 1 12 1 

Voltz, p 3 1 1 

Totals 33 11 13 27 9 I 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




CHAMPIONS OF THE CHICAGO DIVISION 

Willaid Baseball Team, composed of the following, left to right: Bottom row, Frederick Moore, William Kenne, 
R. H. Huston, Arthur McDowell, Edward Gross. Second row, G. E. Archer, C. C. Cross, Jr., R. C. Miller, 
C. E. Bell. Extreme top, P. H. Scisinger, Manager; J. A. Tschuor, General Foreman. 



New Castle ab r bh po a e 

Sisley, 3b 5 1 1 5 2 

Pliler, ss 4 2 1 1 

Daniols, 2b 5 2 1 1 1 1 

Jiatth^y, c 5 1 3 7 2 1 

Wolfgang, rf * 1 

Horner, lb 4 1 2 4 

Irwin, If 4 3 2 

Chill, p. and cf 4 4 1 

Itobcrts, p 4 1 2 

McCorniirk, rf . . . 3 10 10 

'J'otals 39 6 12 24 10 3 

Now CaHllc!. . 10 1 4 0—6 

km wood 5 1 1 4 x -11 

Two-baHol)itH— Si8lcy,M(;ohan, Whito, Shropo, 
Quill(;r, Thrno-baHC hits— O'Malloy, Shrojxv 
Str>h'n baHOH -Mathos, Voltz. Sacrifice hits - 
Median, Slirope, (^uiller, O'Malley, Voltz. 
Left on l){i.seH — N(!W (JaHtle, 8; (ilenwood, (5. 
First base on crrorH — N(!W Castle, 1; CiUjiiwood 



2. Base on balls— off Roberts, 3; off Voltz, 2. 
Struck out, by Roberts, 3; by Chill, 2; by Voltz, 
10. I^mpircs — Jones and Glaseman. 

Jolin Jones has l)een appointed assistant 
manager for the Glenwood sho|)s baseball team. 
Jones says he's put to see that the Glenwood 
shops flies the pennant and holds the chami)ion- 
ship cups when the season comes to an end in 
Baltimore on Labor Day. He has helped the 
team in many ways along its successful career 
this summer and the players and others at t he 
shoi)s are most grateful for his assistance. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Klniwood billing office* has organized a base- 
ball team under the management of Benjamin 
Beck. Another team has been organized under 
the management of RolxMt Searls. It is 
astonishing liow well (Mich learn si)eaks of itself. 
Those of us wiio are forced to remain friends 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



51 



with both teams are anxiously awaiting the 
final result of the series. Talk about the 
excitement when our big league championship 
is decided; we \yill have all the thrills and 
more when our warriors of the diamond meet. 

Machinists John McHale and George Poppe 
took a trip to Newark Sunday, July 21, to play 
a game of ball with the shop team of that city. 
John and George say "never again" for Newark. 
They did not mind losing the game, but the 



treatment accorded the players and their 
wives is the reason. There was no place for 
them to get a drink of water, they stated, and 
after the game they had to find their way back 
to the city as best they could. 

George A. Grogan has been dubbed "Scout" 
by the Northside Athletic Club. In securing 
talent for basball teams he well deserves this 
title. Some of the Terminal teams should 
solicit his services. 



□ □ □ 



Mount Clare Shops on Outing 



The Mount Clare Welfare, Athletic and 
Pleasure Association held its second annual 
excursion to Tolchester Beach on Saturday, 
August 10. The weather was very threatening 
in both the morning and afternoon, which 
halped to keep a number of the employes and 
their families from participating in the evsnt, 
but those who stayed away on account of the 
wsather made a miss by a whole mile, as the 
day was an ideal one for an outing, the trip to 
and from Tolchester being delightful. 

The Mount Clare Band accompanied the 
crowd on the morning boat and kept the crowd 
stepping with its popular music. Professor C.W. 
Hake is some director and knows how to please 
the people. About 2,500 persons were on the 
grounds. On each of two boats one could hear 
everywhere sweet voices, and it really was too 
bad that the director of the Glee Club was not 
present to enlist a few more vocalists. 

On the excursion grounds everthing was 
delightful and pleasant and everybody was 
wearing the smile that would not fade. The 
several sporting events were enjoyed by every- 
one. As usual and as an evidence of the ability 
of woman's training, the married men won the 
baseball game by a score of 11 to 9. The men's 
bowling contest was won by W. E. Carroll, 
Charles Bloomfield andE. Gollery. Mrs.Hoffer, 
and Misses Alma Gibbs and Southcomb were 
the women champions. 

The potato race was very interesting and 
there were twelve fine looking ladies entered. 
The race was won by Miss Etta M. Tatum. 
The cord eating contest was very exciting and 
was won by C. E. Gibbs. He sure is some cord 



eater. Well! The pie eating contest kept 
everybody's mouth stretched from ear to ear, 
as the pies were made of huckelberries and, of 
course, crust. This was won by H. Butterbaugh 
and J. Smith. 

The soda cracker eating contest also caused 
much enjoyment. This was won by J. Budda. 
The tug-of-war was some pull, the ladies being 
given the first choice at pulling on a rope one 
inch thick and fifty feet long. Eight ladies weie 
on each end. It took some time for one side to 
draw the other over the line. The men's tug- 
of-war was some war and some pull; it was a 
stubborn fight, but the Boiler Shop had some 
of its husky ones all on 'one end and won. The 
shoe race caused considerable amusement and 
was won by Solomon Cohen. The three-legged 
race was won by Mr. Cohen and Mr. Smith. 
The 100-yard dash winners: First, Ernest Lehr; 
second, J. E. Dowling; third, Max Fahmiller. 

Two hundred-yard dash: First, H. Eyerly; 
second, John Howe; third, Ernest Lehr. 

The committee of arrangements consisted of 
the following: H. A. Beaumont, Chairman, 
W. S. Eyerly, W. D. Lenderking, H. T. Beck, 
J. E. Tatum, C. N. Southcomb, J. D. Wright, 
William Kern, L. Finegan, J.M. Hittel, W. A. 
Wuster, E. E. Emmerick, W. R. Scheckells, 
J. T. Seibert. E. E. Kent, M. A. Heckwolfe, 
M. V. Pascal, W. L. Gordon, John Howe, Pitts- 
burgh, L. Beaumont, C. W. Hake, T. E. Beck, 
W. E. Carroll, Charles Bloomfield, J. T. Cadagon, 
H. E. Fountain, J. F. Scharnagle. C. E. Gibbs, 
G. W. Smith, George W. Beatty, B. F. Doug- 
las, Jr., V. Kenn, John ConoUy, G. H. Kapinos, 
E. A. Johnson, R. B. CoUison. 



AMONG OURSELVES 

iiiiiiiiaiiii ... .... iiiiiiuiii 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Editor's Office 

It's as inevitable as sunshine after rain. A 
lady, accompanied by her little daughter, 
dropped into the office of the Editor a few days 
ago and declared that she often had heard 
about the courteous service given passengers 
on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, but only 
recently had experienced it in operation. She 
was injured slightly, she related, in an accident 
on another trunk line and to reach her destina- 
tion was given transportation over the Balti- 
more and Ohio. She added that she felt quite 
fortunate in that she fell into the hands of "Tom" 
Ferry, a brakeman on the Newark Division, 
John Sfjingler, steward on car No. 1085, and 
Samuel Jierry, a waiter, between Cincinnati 
and Wheeling. 'J'h(;y showed her every possi- 
ble courtesy and made the trip to Baltimore 
for herself and daughter as comfortable as they 
could, and when she stepped off the train at 
Mt. Royal Station she came into the Editor's 
ofhcf! to tell about it before going to her home. 
A })l eased patron is worth more than real 
money. 

Vice-President's Office 

Frederick Lang, whose phol ograpli appears in 
a groui) on anotluir |)ag(;, efiliHt(;d as first chiss 
yeoman in Wir, disbursing office;, Fifth Naval 
District, at Noifolk, Va., where lie is now 
stationed. He luid been in tlx; em|)loy of the 
l^aItimor(j and Oliir) for feti y(!ars, diu'irig the 
lasy two of which nnd uj) (o t lu; t ime of his 
listment he was assistant secretary and slenog- 
raphcr in the office of vice-president (jleorgc 



M. Shriver. Prior to his promotion to the vice- 
president's office, he was in the office of the 
secretary of the Company and before that, suc- 
cessively, in the telegraph, motive power, elec- 
trical and engineering departments. 

Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, John Limpert 

One more star has been added to our service 
flag. A. T. W. Moore was called to the 
National Army. Good luck, Albert, and may 
you return safely. 

J. P. Landerkin has also fallen in line and may 
now be numbered among ''those married." 
Some very pretty silver was presented the 
happy couple by the employes of this office. 
May they both enjoy a long and happy married 
life. 

On July 5 a bouncing baby boy, nine and one- 
half })ounds, was born to Mr. and Mrs. W. P. 
Collins. Congratulations. 

Auditor Passenger Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, Frederick S. Johnson 

In selecting John P. Francis as an accountant, 
the city ticket office of the United States 
Railroad Administration has secured one of the 
al)l(;st of clerks. He entercul the service of the 
Baltimore and Ohio as a (ilerk in the auditor of 
nuMeJiuudise r(u;eip(s' office;, February 15, 1900. 
On June 14, 1!)()7, lie was t ransferred to a train 
auditorshij) which is attached to this office, and 
on July 20, 1908, he was made head clerk of the 
ticket stock record department,, which posi- 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



53 




R. M. BILLMEYER 



tion he has held for the past ten years. 
''Johnny/' as he is generally known, together 
with his smile that seldom comes off, will be 
missed up on the eleventh floor of the Lexington 
Street building, 

Alvion Hoffman, formerly of the Cincinnati, 
Hamilton and Dayton Railway, who while with 
us had charge of the miscellaneous bureau, 
probably will continue his railroad career with 
some Cincinnati line. The railroad that 
secures the services of Mr. Hoffman will be 
fortunate, and we wish him success. 

When President Wilson designated June 29, 
1918, as War Savings Day, there were three 
teams appointed from this office to gather sub- 
scriptions for both Thrift and War Savings 
Stamps. The teams were known as the Blue 
and Gray, Rainbow and Liberty. Each had a 
president, secretary and three vice-secre- 
taries. The names of the members of the 
teams were as follows: 

Blue and Gray: Miss B. M. Broderick, presi- 
dent; Walter L. Seems, secretary; Miss Mollie 
A. Hamlen, assistant secretary; Miss Nina V. 
Paxton, assistant secretary; John M. Finn, 
assistant secretary. 

Rainbow: R. M. Billmeyer, president; Miss 
F. M. Heiderich, secretary; Miss C. Hayden, 
assistant secretary; R. E. Machin, assistant 
secretary; C. E. Owings, assistant secretary. 

Liberty: F. S. Johnson, president; Miss Ulla 
Nilson, secretary; Miss Helen Lutman, assist- 
ant secretary; Miss V. E. Benson, assistant 
secretary; C. W. Lewis, assistant secretary. 

The subscriptions for the teams were: Blue 
and Gray, $674.50; Rainbow, $851.50 and 
Liberty, $818.75, a total of $2,344.75. These 



teams are permanent and they will continue to 
serve until December 1, 1918. 

There have been several promotions among 
the various head clerkships of this office due 
to the resignation of Alvion Hoffman and the 
transfer of J. P. Francis to the position of 
accountant in the office of the U. S. Govern- 
ment Railroad Administration ticket office in 
the Baltimore and Ohio buikUng. The promo- 
tions are as follows: R. W. Norris succeeds Mr. 
Hoffman, resigned; Frank Piquette succeeds J. 
P. Francis, transferred; E. N. King succeeds R. 
W. Norris, promoted; John M. Finn succeeds 
Mr. King; Wilson T. Jenkins, promoted to head 
clerk, succeeds Bert Ogden, resigned to return 
to Cincinnati, his former home. 

Frank E. Piquette, of this office, and Miss 
Mary E. Tate were married June 29 at the home 
of the bride, 634 Colulnbia Avenue. After the 
wedding there was a reception. They were 
presented a very handsome silver service by 
co-workers of Mr. Piquette. The many friends 
of Mr. and Mrs. Piquette join in hearty con- 
gratulations. 

The cut shown below is from a photograph 
of Louis Shaler Johnson, son of Frederick S. 
Johnson, Magazine correspondent. He is wait- 
ing anxiously to do his bit for Uncle Sam. 

Grouped upon another page are the photo- 
graphs of eight out of twenty-two men from this 
office who are doing duty overseas. They are: 

Frederick G. Miller, secretary to C. H. 
Poumairat, enlisted as a private in the 446th 
Engineers, and has since been promoted to 
sergeant. He has a six months gold stripe for 





LOUIS SHALER JOHNSON 



54 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



« 




foreign service, and he was in Paris during 
the bombardment of that place by the long 
range guns. 

Harry C. Phillips enlisted in the Fifth Regi- 
ment while it was still here in Baltimore. 
When the regiment went into training at 
Anniston, Ala., Harry made up his mind to 
become an officer, and by hard work has since 
been promoted to a sergeantcy. 

Henry J. Burns enlisted in the Navy as a 
yeoman when Uncle Sam first asked Maryland 
to furnish him with 800 men to man his ships 
and is now stationed on one of his gimboats. 

Charles L. ]\Iyers enlisted as a private in 
our still famous Fifth Regiment. He was in 
training all last winter at Anniston, but is now 
located overseas with the rest of our noble 
boys. 

Charles Grewe also joined the Fifth Regiment 
when war was declared. Charles will give a 
good account of himself when he faces the 
Kaiser's forces. 

Roland B. Hasson with T. Lucien Jeffries 
are attached to the 146th Infantry, now doing 
duty somewhere in France. 

Edward D. Boylan enlisted in the Fifth 
Regiment and after training all winter at 
Anniston, had the opportunity to enter the 
Officers' Training School at Camp Gordon, 
Ga. He was promoted to a corporal early 
last winter. 

J. W. McGrain left us to go into Uncle Sam's 
National Army at Camp Meade. "Mac" told 
us before he left that if he once got into it he 
would do his share. So, go to it **Mac," with 
our best wishes. 

Auditor Disbursements' Office 

Correspondent, J. F. Donov.\n 

In a group on another page is a photograph 
of Private J. L. Sherwood, now in France with 
the 31.5th Regiment, 79th Division, defendinji 
Old Glory against German Kultur. Private 
Sherwood was born in Savannah, Ga., and came 
to Baltimore about a year ago. He succeeded 
in having the Savannah local board release him 
to join the Maryland boys at Camp Meade and 
his star is now a part of the service flag in the 
auditor disbursement's office. 

In addition the following, all from this office, 
are now serving their country: S. G. Beeman, 

G. L. Burnes, W. J. BqIiIb^ F. D. Campbell, 

H. Corkran, L. M. Dwyer, H. Fanning, C. JI. 
Foster, H. M. Foster, N. C. Harrington, .1. 
McHale, G. W. Mettle, L. M. Paige, H. A. 
Iloddy, James St. Ledger, G. M. Shamer, G. ('. 
Seliludcrburg, N. Trott, D. J. VVilliauiKon, VV. 
E. Waldman, J. J. Whalen, V. J. Yealdhall. 



THE LATE WILLIAM H. KEIDEL 

Auditor of Merchandise Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, Harry Braxsby 

William H. Keidel, one of the chief clerks to 
the auditor of merchandise receipts, died July 
22 at his home, 1924 West North Avenue, 
Baltimore, after an illness of six weeks from 
Bright's disease. Mr. Keidel was born Novem- 
ber 1, 1875, and began his railroad career with 
the Baltimore and Ohio on April 22, 1895. in the 
office of auditor of revenue, in the Statistical 
Bureau. In 1902, when the Accounting Depart- 
ment was organized, he was transferred to the 
office of auditor of merchandise receipts, and 
his ability to grasp the intricacies of railroad 
accounting gained for him quick recognition by 
his superior officers. After many i)romotions 
he was appointed to one of the chief clerkships 
July 1, 1914, in charge of the Agents' Settlement 
Department. He is survived by his widow, 
Mrs. William H. Keidel, his mother, Mrs. Cath- 
erine M. Keidel, and three children, William H. 
Keidel, Jr., Julia C. Keidel and James R. 
Keidel. 

Engineering Department 

Sergeant M. C. Sparks, Headquarters Com- 
pany, 313th Infantry, is as popular with his 
National Army scjuad as he was with his fellow 
('mi)loye.s of tlie Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 
He formerly was a civil (niginecn' with the con- 
paiiy in t he Fn'ziiiceriri'j; n(»|)art ment atul s(!rved 
the ( 'ompany twelve years. His photograph is 
among the grouj) on anol luir page. Ihire's what 
one of the men in his scpiad thought of him: 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



55 



To Our First Sergeant 

First Sergeant Sparks is his name, 

The way they treat him is a shame. 

He works from morning until night, 

I cannot see where that is right. 

He works inside and outside, too. 

He does what I think two men should do. 

He works from Reveille to Taps, 

In the office, trench and with the saps, 

He drew the plans for our bandstand, 

And all the folks say it is grand. 

In civil life an engineer. 

And think they had to bring him here. 

Such different work from what he did, 

I pity him, the poor kid. 

Every morning the same — ''First Sergeant," 

To the bug-house I would be sent 

If I were made First Sergeant. 

When 300 men fall out in line. 

He gets them fixed up in little time. 

It is some job, I sure must say. 

To get them to, stand one way. 

The boys don't appreciate this fine man, 

For him I'd do whatever I can. 

That is not much. I must declare, 

But if everybody would do his share. 

The Sergeant would not get gray hair. 

He has Warren Lee to contend with too, 

And that is something, I tell you. 

He went to town to get a scamp. 
Who liked his home more than the Camp, 
He brought him back one rainy night. 
And the absentee was filled with fright. 
Sergeant of the Guard I heard he'll be. 
He'll get through O. K., you wait and see. 
Acting Colonel, Major and Captain, three, 
I think this Sergeant of ours will be 
Before they ship us oversea. 

Sergeants all, if you want good marks, 
Follow the footsteps of Sergeant Sparks. 
Of course, your work will never eeasc, 
Until the world is again at peace. 
And then you'll surely make a hit. 
Because the folks know you've done your bit. 
Must say before I close this poem, 
I hope we'll all come safely home. 
Especially our First Sergeant. 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, J. V. Costello, Trainmaster's 
Clerk, St. George 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanlin -. Chairman, Superintendent 

B. F. Kelly Vice-Chairman 

Miss Eva Runnow Secretary, Trainmaster's Clerk 

H. W. Ordeman Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Dr. F. De Revere , Medical Examiner 

A. J. CoNLEY Road Foreman of Engines 

J. D. Gibb Trainmaster 



J. F. McGoWAN Division Operator 

E. R. Decher Division Agent 

W. J. Kenney Attorney 

C. A. Wilson Supervisor Crossing Watchmen 

Rotating Members ^ 

W. Neidehhauser Towerman, Tower B 

J. B. Gerow Freight Conductor 

Guy Fetter Painter 

W. Smith Locomotive Engineer 

J. Naples Locomotive Fireman 

W. A. Marshall Clerk to Agent, Tompkinsville 

G.J. Goolic Inspector 



Hugh Conlon, inspector, Maintenance ot Way 
Department, is receiving congratulations over 
the safe arrival of a bouncing baby boy, weigh- 
ing ten poimds when born. 

E. A. English, marine supervisor, is enjoying 
his vacation in Portland, Maine. C. H. Kear- 
ney, assistant marine supervisor, is now acting 
marine supervisor. 

C. A. Wilson, supervisor of crossing watch- 
men, and W. P. Hall, track supervisor, are now 
owners of automobiles. Most any night you 
will see these two automobile experts running 
around the country to see which is the best. 

On another page is picture of Carl Anderson, 
now "Somewhere in France," doing his bit 
for Uncle Sam. Carl entered the service of 
this Company in July, 1913, as messenger; 
was promoted to clerk in February, 1914; 
assistant car accoimtant, September 1, 1914; 
assistant timekeeper in March, 1915; night 
lighterage clerk in September, 1916, and in 
September, 1916, was promoted to general 
clerk to the superintendent. Prior to his en- 
listment in the Engineers' Corps, he was fuel 
clerk to division accoimtant. He was fur- 
loughed June 30, 1917, to do his bit. Quite a 
number of letters have been received from 
Carl, in which he states that he has been a 
yard clerk on a narrow-gauge railroad. This 
railroad ruJis up to the batteries and brings 
supplies and ammimition to the gimners. Dur- 
ing January, 1918, he was working as a brake- 
man on the C. Z. Z. & N., a railroad "Some- 
where in France." 

Miss Bessie Gaynor, clerk to marine super- 
visor, and Miss Edith O'Mara, clerk in the car 
accountant's office, are enjoying their vacation 
at Lake George, N. Y. 

Miss Anna Bloom has returned from a pleas- 
ant vacation and is in the best of health. 

"Willie" Stark, mail clerk in the superin- 
tendent's office, is enjoying his vacation in 
Washington, D. C. 

B. F. Kelly, trainmaster, has returned from 
a very pleasant vacation and is in first class 
health. 

C. A. Wilson, supervisor of crossing watch- 
men, made the trip to Baltimore, August 3, 
to witness the baseball game between Mt. 
Clare Shops and the Staten Island Division. 
After the game "Charlie" went around the 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




JOHN H. CORSON AND SON 



town and up to the present writing has not 
showed up. There must be some wonderful 
attraction in Baltimore. 

Lieutenant Kelsey, whose photograph appears 
in a group on another page, has been employed 
at St. George piers for a number of years as 
tallyman, foreman at the lighterage piers, 
general foreman at the coal piers, and finally 
general foreman at the lighterage piers. The 
boys at St. George all wish him a speedy return 
and much success in the army. 

John H. Corson, of Richmond Valley, S. I., a 
conductor of the Staten Lsland Rapid Transit 
Railway, saved two little boys from drowning 
off (Jlifton, S. ]., June 14, when he jumped into 
the water and brought both of them to shore. 
I'he boys, who w(;r(! brothers, five and seven 
years ohl, resf)ectively, had been playing on 
sonK; logs at the dock of the Merritt-(yhai)man 
Wrecking Go., when th(; wash from a large tug 
passing tlirew th(; little fellows into the water, 
'i'hfiir cries for h(;lj) attracted the attention of 
(>orsf)n who, without waiting to throw ofT any 
of his clothing, jumix'd into th(! water. Mr. 
(Jorson, wlio woiks on a freight train, niturncd 
to his train after the incidfjnt and, without 
changing clothes for dry ones, continued his 
duties through th(! day. As you will note; by 
th(; pir-ture print (;d Jibove, Mr. ('orson loves 
small childr(!n. 

A f)holograph of "(ius" Trabant, now "Sorne- 
wher(! in France" is on iinother page. 'I'ra- 
l)ant (intcrcd the service? of the Staten Island 
Rai)id 'IVjinsit H.!i ilw!iy on June 5, 1911, as t rain- 
in.'in .'irul on April 2'.\, lOlH, was furloughed to 
enter the service of the S. Government, 



aching to do his bit "over there." The best of 
luck was extended to "Gus" when he departed 
from Staten Island. 

Staten Island Railroad Club 

On Wednesday afternoon and evening, July 
1, the Staten Island Railroad Club held its 
fourth armual picnic and field day at Midland 
Park, Grant City, S. I. In the afternoon there 
was a baseball game, running, jumping and a 
number of other athletic events. The winners 
in each were awarded handsome prizes. In the 
evening there was dancing. A very pleasant 
time was enjoyed by the enormous crowd that 
attended. 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondents 
J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 
W. J. Scott, Shop Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent 

C. E. Owen Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

T. Bloecher Division Engineer 

J. P. HiNES Master Mechanic 

J. E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

H. K. Hartman Road Foreman of Engines 

T. B. Franklin Terminal Agent 

J. C. KuHN .Captain of Police 

F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

E.G. Owens Road Engineer 

W. E. Burns Road Fireman 

H. F. Lane Road Conductor 

J. F. CooNEY Yard Conductor 

Wm. Tisdale Machine Shop Foreman 

R. F. MiNNiCK Car Builder 

Felice Cori Section Foreman 

E. F. Kenna Secretary 




.1. y\. SULLIVAN. CAPTAIN OF POLICE 
AND J. N. GODMAN 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



57 





i lii.U ,11 



SIDK, PHILADELPHIA 



J. C. Lever, formerly acrent at Lehigh and 
Howard Streets, Philadelphia, which was 
closed July 1, has taken a position as claim clerk 
at Race Street Station, Philadelphia. 

A, McAllister, chief clerk, Race Street, Phila- 
delphia, has resigned to accept another position. 

W. S. Murphy, who has been receiving clerk 
at Pier 12 for several years past, has been 
appointed chief clerk at Race Street. 

J. M. Graves, agent Pier 40, is taking a vaca- 
tion. 

T. Bloecher, division engineer, is enjoying 
a vacation and was last heard from at his old 
home, Rutherford, N. J. 




E.fF. Kenna, secretary to superintendent 
hasl^just returned from a vacation, having 
visited Denver, Colo., and other western cities. 

E. B. Rittenhouse has been appointed acting 
agent at Wilmington, Del., in place of H. H. 
Carver, who has been granted leave of absence 
because of sickness. 

W. E. Guyton, who was ticket agent at Ches- 
ter, Pa., has been appointed acting agent at 
Childs, Md., in place of E. B. Rittenhouse, 
transferred. 

Effective on June 1, C. E. McGann was 
appointed assistant master mechanic at East 
Side. He takes the place of W. L. Wilson, who 
resigned. 

Effective on June 1, William Clardy was 
appointed general car foreman at East Side. 
He takes the place of W. H. Hollen. 

F. P. Young has been appointed car foreman, 
effective June 1. He takes the place of William 
Clardy, who was promoted. 



EAST SIDE FREIGHT YARD OFFICE 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondents 

H. Tarr, Superintendent's Office, Camden 
Station 

J. A. Clarkson, Assistant Yardmaster, Hopper 
Yards, Locust Point 



W 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



58 




GEORGE ("DUKE") DELAXEY 



E. K. Smith, Secretary Y. M. C. A., Bruns- 
wick, Md. 

P. P. PuRGiTT, Shop Draftsman, Riverside Shops 

Divisional Safety Committee 

P. C. Allen Chairman, Superintendent 

W. E. Neilson Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 

T. E. Stacy Secrotary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secratary, Brunswick 

C. II. VViNSLow Secretary, Washington 

Relief Department 

Dit. E. H. Mathehs Medical Exarniner, Baltimore 

Dh. J. a. Robb Medical Examiner, Washington 

Du. J. F. Waho Medical Examiner, Winchester 

R. li. Bankh Divisional Claim Asient, Baltimore 

J. J. McCakron Captain of Police, Camden Station 

Tranbpohtation Department 

S. A. Jordan Assistant Supiirintondent, Brunswick, Md. 

C. A.Mew.shaw Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. E. HuRWjcK Division Operator, Camdon Station 

J. W. Cavey Road Foreman of EnKin.-s, Riviirsidv- 

L. J, Cboshley Freight ,\Kcnt. Camdi^n Station 

\j. S. Collier Fr.'ight Conductor, ICIIicotf City 

.1. W. Roney Yard Conductor, Mt. Clare Junction 

E. B. OwEN.s PasHRHKcr lOnKineman, liivcrsidu 

II. O. iloER.vio Freight Firornan, llivorsific 

J.J. MfC^ABE. .Trainmaster anfl Road Foreman, Ilarri.sonhurg 

VV. T. MwKK Freight Agent, I>ocust Point 

I). M. FlHHER Freight .\gcnt, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Tranhfcr .Agent, firun-iwick 

Maintenance or Way Department 

CI. S. Ckiteh Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Ma.-tter Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thomphon Hignal HuperviHor, Camden Stat ion 

J. Flanagan Oonoral Foreman, Locust Point 



C. W. Selby Supervisor, Gaithersburg 

S. J. Lichliter Supervisor, Staunton, Va. 

W. O. RuNKLES Section Foreman, Brunswick 

C. RiTTER Signal Repairman, Mt. Royal Station 

R. W. Mitchell Carpenter Foreman, Baltimore 

Motive Power Department 

T. p. Perkinbon Ma.ster Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. Williamson General Car Foreman, Riverside 

T. O'Leary Cai Foreman, Washington 

C. W. C. Smith Machinist, Brunswick 

C.B. BosiEN Machinist Apprentice, Riverside 

J W. Peyton .Leading Car Inspector, Brunswick 

G. N. Hammond, Gang P^oreman, Locust Point 



Opposite is a photograph of George ("Duke") 
Delaney, formerly clerk to W. D. Burnham, 
general foreman Electrical Department at 
Baileys. "Duke" is five feet five inches tall 
and weighs 208 poimds and is a member of 
Company C, 57th Engineers. He's hot footing 
it after the Huns. 

Engineer J. R. Carroll, of engine 1127, is 
very anxious to know what the attraction 
is on Key Highway for his fireman, J. M. 
Smith. Ask "Joe" Bayne, he knows. 

Brakeman Charles Davis, on No. 5, A shift, 
Locust Point, is grieving on account of being 
too old to enlist in Uncle Sam's army. He 
would like to show the boys how he fought 
the Spaniards on San Juan Hill in 1898. Enlist 
in the Home Guards. 

The accompanying photograph is that of 
Ernest O. Frey, eight years old, grandson of 
assistant yardmaster Joseph A. Clarkson. He 
saves all his quarters and buys Thrift Stamps. 




ERNEST O. FREY 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



23 



recalls that when he and his men un- 
loaded 801 cars in a single day, the 
achievement was heralded far and wide. 
The average was sixteen and one-half tons 
per car. 

On February 1, 1902, Mr. Metzger 
was transferred to the Curtis Bay yard. 
His knowledge of loading of coal into 
ships of all kinds stood him in good 
stead. One day the huge seven-masted 
schooner Thomas W. Lawson pulled into 
port for a load of fuel. This was the 
largest sailing vessel that had ever 
pulled up to the Curtis Bay coal piers 
of the Baltimore and Ohio and Mr. 
Metzger took great pride in the fact 
that he helped to fill this schooner. He 
recalls that the vessel was lost a few 
years later off the Sicily Islands. In 



loading the vessel Mr. Metzger and his 
fellow workers made a record, dumping 
411 cars of coal into the hold of the Law- 
son and other vessels. 

In October, 1906, Mr. Metzger re- 
quested that he be relieved of his duties 
at Curtis Bay, as an old injury was 
giving him trouble and the work at 
Curtis Bay was increasing rapidly. He 
was sent back to the hopper yard as 
clerk, which place he held until his 
retirement. 

And in addition to the other things 
that he boasts of, Mr. Metzger points 
with greatest pride to the service flag 
in his home. Its one star represents 
the son who is now serving the United 
State in France with an ammunition 
train. This is a child by his first wife. 



□ □ □ 



John Herbert Gochnauer Gassed 



News has been received by D. A. Gochnauer, 
of the local freight office, Camden Station, 
Baltimore, that his son, Private John Herbert 
Gochnauer, is confined to a military hosiptal 
in France after having been gassed in an attack 




PRIVATE JOHN HERBERT GOCHNAUER 



in which he took part. Private Gochnauer 
was one of the first to enlist from the Accounting 
Department of the same office in which his 
father is employed. 

Private Gochnauer is a member of the 117th 
Trench Mortar Battery, which was a part of 
the Rainbow Division, an organization which 
has made a lasting reputation for itself because 
of the unparalleled bravery of every man in the 
outfit. This battery is composed wholly of 
Baltimore and Maryland men and its deeds 
will make the brightest records in the history 
of this war. It was in one of the early attacks 
that Private Gochnauer was gassed. In his 
letters to his parents, who live at Lansdowne, 
Md., he states that he believes that he will 
recover soon and be ready to take his place 
again in the front line trenches. His many co- 
workers were sorry to hear that he was the 
victim of Him barbarity and they are hoping 
that he will completely recover and be able to 
again help in driving back the Germans. Pri- 
vate Gochnauer stated in letters that he is 
anxious to hear from his Baltimore and Ohio 
friends and says a letter addressed to him at 
Headquarters Company, A. P. O. 727, Classi- 
fication Camp, France, will reach him promptly. 



United States Railroad Administration 
Orders and Circulars 



New Rates of Pay for Mechanics 

The Railroad Administration issues the fol- 
lowing: 

Director General McAdoo announces that 
he has approved Supplement No. 4 to General 
Order No. 27, which provides the following 
minimum rates and increases for employes of 
the mechanical departments on all railroads 
under Federal control: 

1. Machinists, boilermakers, blacksmiths, 
sheet-metal workers, molders and first-class 
electrical workers, sixty-eight cents per hour. 

2. Car men and second-class electrical work- 
ers, fifty-eight cents per hour. 

3. Helpers, forty-five cents per hour. 

4. Foremen, paid on hourly basis, five cents 
per hour more than respective crafts. 

5. Foremen, paid on monthly basis, increase 
$40 per month, minimum $155 and maximum 
$250. 

6. New rates are retroactive to January 1, 
1918. 

7. Beginning August 1, 1918, eight-hour day 
with time and one-half for overtime. 

Bars Liquor on Systems 

General Order No. 39 
The sale of liquors and intoxicants of every 
character in dining cars, restaurants, and rail- 
road stations under Federal control shall be 
discontinu(!d immediately. 

W. G. McAdoo, 
JHreclor (icneral of Railroads. 

Labor Appointments Announced 

The United States Railroad Administration, 
Division of lijibor, authorizes the following: 

WASHiNfiTON, July 20, 1918. 
CiHcuLAii No. 1 
The following Jij)pointm(;nts as representa- 
tives of the Division of Labor are announced: 
William iilarkman, effective July 5, 1918; John 
A Moffitt, efTccfive July 15, 1918; Ariflieny M. 
Banks, effective July 18, 1918. 



These representatives of the Division ol 
Labor will be assigned to conduct investigations 
and to represent the Division of Labor of the 
Railroad Administration in other specific mat 
ters to which they may be assigned affecting 
employes of the railroads under Federal control. 

W. S. Carter, 
Director, Division of Labor. 

Approved: 
W. G. McAdoo, 

Director General of Railroads. 

No Changes in Personnel 

Circular No. 11 
In several instances railroad systems have 
been divided or combined for purposes of opera- 
tion. This will produce no effect upon the 
accounting organization or persormel of those 
railroads, which will remain and act exactly 
as in the past until instructions are issued from 
this office. 

C. A. Prouty, 
Director, Division of Public Service 
and Accounting . 

Acting Treasurer Named 

Circular No. 45 
Effective this date, L. G. Scott is appointed 
acting treasurer of the United States Railroad 
Administration, vice A. D. McDonald (vice- 
president and controller of the Southern Pacific 
Co.), acting treasurer, resigned. 

W. G. McAdoo, 
Director General of Railroads. 



New Mail and Express Section 

The United States Railroad Administration 
issues the following: 

Effective July 10, there has been created a 
section of express and mail in connection with 
the United States Railroad Administration. 
F. S. llolbrook, formerly vice j)resident of 
VVells-Fargo JOxi)ress Co., has been appointed 
manager under director of division of traffic. 
Mr. Ilolbrook's office will be with the division 
of Iraflic in the Interstate Commerce Commis- 



24 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



59 



William A. McCleary, terminal trainmaster, 
has been spending his vacation at Pen Mar. 
During his absence, John L. Hoffman, night 
terminal trainmaster, has been holding down 
the job. Harry Meyers has been acting train- 
master at night. 

We are sorry to note that John H. Bing, 
general yardmaster at Locust Point yards, 
is off on sick leave. Wc hope to see him back 
again soon. Assistant yardmaster Archie 
Blackburn is acting in his place. 

After an illness of five months, assistant 
yardmaster John E. Green, of Locust Point, 
has returned to duty. 

Uncle Sam has called to the colors yard 
clerk John J. Link. We are proud of John in 
his new uniform. 

Brakeman L. R. Whitelock has been acting 
as clerk in the yardmaster's office for some 
time past, getting no-bill cars cleaned up. Now 
he has gone to Curtis Bay yard to assist 
''Jimmy" Driscoll in that territory. 

W^e are sorry to hear that engineer Edward 
Barling is on the sick list and hope he will be 
fully recovered by the time the next Liberty 
Loan Bond issue is floated, as "Ed" is surely 
some salesman. 

In a group on another page is Corporal 
W'arren L. Morgan, of Headquarters Company, 
313th Infantry, formerly at Camp Meade, 
getting his share of grub, while camping at 
Druid Hill Park last April. Corporal Morgan 
was former secretary^ to L. Finegan, superin- 
tendent of shops, and is now in France. 

S. R. Bosley, clerk to road foreman of engines, 
Riverside, at time of his draft, did not leave the 
shores of the U. S. A. without joining the ranks 
of the benedicts when he set sail with the 313th 
Regiment. The other party to the contract 
was Miss Elizabeth Smith, of Dorsey, Md. 

When the 313th Regiment set sail, it took 
quite a number of the Baltimore Division boys, 
and from indications, no doubt, we will be hear- 
ing from them soon. "Go to it, boys." 

The 66th Regiment of Engineers, in camp for 
a while at Laurel, got a number of the boys 
through voluntary enlistment. Among them 
was fireman C. O. Harry, whose home is at 
Frederick, Md. 

Fireman A. B. Frock, who joined the Navy, 
dropped in on us the other day. Mr. Frock is 
one of our Brunswick boys. He left fireman 
L. C. Moler at Hampton Roads, who also 
joined the Naval Reserves. 

A photograph is shown in a grouji on another 
page of Corporal E. Lee Roy MacKenzie, who 
is now in France with the engineering corps 
helping to keep the men in the trenches supplied 
so that they can drive back the boches. Cor- 
poral MacKenzie is remembered as a first class 
machinist apprentice at Riverside, from which 
he was furloughcd April 14^ 1918. He entered 



the employ of the Baltimore and Ohio as mes - 
senger on December 10, 1914, and was named 
first class apprentice March 7, 1916. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Louis MacKenzie, 1413 
Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore. 

Lieutenant-Colonel R. A. Grammes very much 
surprised us by dropping in the other day 
from "overseas." The lieutenant looks hale 
and hearty and everyone was glad to shake 
hands with him and hear of interesting facts 
from the other side. He is of the same opinion 
as others who have been "over there," that 
we have a job on our hands, but that we are 
equal to it. 

J. B. ]\Ioriarity, the genial secretary to super- 
intendent P. C. Allen, took his leave for Camp 
Meade on July 24. His friends in the office saw 
that "Barney" did not go empty-handed, and 
fitted him up with a kit of useful articles for use 
in service "overseas." The only thing that 
worried 'Barney" was that he could not take 
his boat along and the girls. Bon voyage to 
"Barney" and we trust he sees the streets of 
Berlin and returns with a lot of reminiscences. 
However, "Barney" is a past master at "telling 
them" and we do not expect him to get very 
far without hearing from him. 

J. W. Cavey succeeds E. C. Shipley, de- 
ceased, as road foreman of engines. Mr." 
Cavey's experiences as a fireman and engineer 
have been principally on the Baltimore Divi- 
sion, and he is thoroughly acquainted with 
all the details and is known to all the boys and, 
no doubt, has their hearty cooperation in 
making things go. 

R. A. Cole is acting as trainmaster in place 
of Z. M. Biddison, at Washington, who is on 
his vacation. 

F. R. Browning, terminal road foreman of 
engines, is back from his vacation, which he 
spent among the mountains of West Virginia. 

Charles M. Shriver, son of vice-president 
George M. Shriver, has been commissioned a 
second lieutenant in the United States Army. 
He is with the Overseas Railroad Transporta- 
tion Corps in France. He entered the employ 
of the Baltimore and Ohio, June 20, 1910, as 
machinist helper, Motive Power Department, 
Mt. Clare, completing the full apprenticeship 
course. On May 1, 1914, he was assigned as 
second class apprentice at Baileys, Locust 
Point and Riverside. In June, 1915, he was 
appointed machinist at Riverside and February 
1, 1916, inspector of fuel service. On April 16, 
same year, he was named assistant road fore- 
man of engines, Cumberland Division; March 3, 
1917, assistant trainmaster, Philadelphia Divi- 
sion; May 20, 1917, trainmaster, Portsmouth 
Branch, Ohio Division. 

In a group on another page is a photograph 
of first class seaman James J. Perkinson, son of 
master mechanic T. F. Perkinson. A graduate 
of Mount Saint Joseph's College, Irvington, 
he enlisted in Maryland's 800. Although only 



60 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



eighteen years of age, he was one of the leading 
football and basketball pla^-ers at the college 
and tipped the beam at one himdred and eighty 
pounds, his height being five feet, ten inches. 
The master mechanic can well be proud of his 
son, who worked in the Power Department for 
a time. 

Engineer J. M. Ecker, running out of River- 
side, likes his engine whistle. Ask "Jim." 
Perhaps the noise attracts the ladies. 

Master mechanic T. F. Perkinson has re- 
turned after spending an enjoyable vacation. 

It is quite a frequent occurrence for the big 
air birds to be seen flying over one's head. 
Sometimes they can just be seen in the haze; 
again they are cjuite close. 

T. E. Cage, chief crew dispatcher, is again 
back with the boys after quite a siege of sick- 
ness. All were glad to see him. While Mr. 
Cage was away, his place was filled by C. R. 
McKeldin, with J. R. Floyd on night duty. 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Wixslow, Secretary, 
Y.M.C.A. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

G. H. WiNSLOw Chairman, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. James B. Ghjer. .Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 

Motive Power Department 
W. M. Grant Boiler Foreman 

H. A. Bright Gang Leader 

C. J. Ayers Gang Leader 

A. F. Kreglow Storekeeper 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher 

N. Tippet Foreman, Car Shop 

H. A. Barefield Assistant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

J. J. Desmo.nd Gang Leader 

G. Valentine Yard Engine Dispatcher 

B. Howard Assistant Foreman 

R. Heindrich Foreman, Station 

Transportation Department 

P. H. Deleplane Train Director 

L. T. Keane Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 

Maintenance of Way Department 
W. M. Card<vell Ma.ster Carpenter 

F. W. Hodgeb Foreman, Carpenter Sliop 

H. L. Bell Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

A. M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. I'mbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Richmond Signal Maintainer 

ElEi TKK AL DePAKT.MENT 

S. W. Whight Foreman 

E. .M. WooDH Chief Clerk 



S('V(;ral first aid chissos, under the direction 
f)f the \V;i.shiiigf on Terminal Women's Aux- 
iliary to \ Red ('rcHs, hav<! b(!('n held. One 
is now tiiiight by Dr. .1. Ji. (jri(!r, medical ex- 
aminer of the Washington 'I'erminal ('ompany, 
and one by I^r. H. P. Feigley, assistant medical 
examin(;r. The H(!con(i advanc(?d course; will 
be given Iat(T in the season. The former ad- 
vanced cl;uss, tlie members of which passed 



very creditable examinations, was the first to 
be held in the District. This class will be 
taught by Dr. H. T. A. Lemon. Most valuable 
information is imparted to all attending and the 
instruction thus received may be the means of 
saving life in emergency cases. 

The office of G. K. Roper, traveling secretary 
of the railroad department of the International 
Young Men's Christian Association, for the 
southeastern district, is now located in Room 
261, Union Station. This makes it much more 
convenient for men coming to the city to see 
Mr. Roper on association business and we also 
think he is doing well to locate in such good 
company. 

A school of instruction for the ticket de- 
partment is operated in Room 601, Southern 
Railway Building, by the United States Rail- 
road Administration and is imder the direction 
of E. Birch, G. P. James and R. W'. Carter. 
Two classes are held, one during the day and 
one in the evening. The course covers a period 
of two months. These classes are taught by 
Clyde H. Freed and Howard Rambo. The 
students receive pay while under instruction — 
$50 per month if attending both classes, and 
$25 per month if attending only one class. 
Permanent positions are given at the expira- 
tion of the course. These classes are open to 
women only. 

A list of ''Timely Topics" for the four o'clock 
Sunday afternoon meetings has been arranged 
at the Terminal Railroad Y. M. C. A. for rail- 
road and enlisted men for August, September 
and October. They will be illustrated by 
stereopticon slides, with illustrated songs, 
each Simday. The topics are as follows: 
' 'God in American History, ' ' ' 'Words and Deeds 
of Christ," "The Man Who Never Heard," 
"China," "The Deliverance of Jerusalem," 
"The Great Destroyer," "America, God's 
Melting Pot," "Japan and Korea," "The Euro- 
pean W^ar," "The Flag of Freedom," "South 
America and Mexico" and"Makersof America." 

The record of beds used at the Terminal Rail- 
road Y. M. C. A. by railroad men is like the 
thermometer, going up. A daily average dur- 
ing July of 220 and a total of 6,815. At no time 
did a man have to wait for a bed. 



Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting, ChkJ Clerk 

It is well to keep the names of those of our 
nmnber who have gone to fight the great fight 
for Liberty, E(iuality and Fraternity before us 
as often as we can, and in order that any into 
whose hands a copy of this Ma(;azine may fall 
may be enabled to recognize the names of any of 
their old companions and co-workers, the fol- 
lowing list of soldiers and sailors who have 
gon(! from this station will perhaps hv, of some 
assistance: 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 



Name Former Occupation 

R. L. Butler Truckman. 

Theodore W. English. . .Stenographer. 

W. A. Finch Truckman. 

R. L. Kendig Delivery clerk. 

L. L. Kendig Delivery clerk. 

E. W. Kidwiler Adjustment clerk. 

J. J. Laverine Abstract clerk. 

Edgar Miller Tallyman. 

Jacob Plater Truckman. 

W. Lee Santman Revenue waybill clerk. 

Irwin Stein Stenographer. 

C. W. Stevenson Truckman. 

E. G. Taubersmitt Truckman. 

W. H. Barnes Truckman. 

Benjamin Cornish Truckman. 

Lewis Woodrow Truckman. 

This list is complete up to the present time; 
probably before the next issue it will be much 
larger, especially if the newly proposed draft 
aie limit, from 18 to 45 years, should go into 
effect. 

We have received word from some of our boys 
of their safe arrival "over there" and our hope 
now is to hear of their safe return, covered with 
laurels of victory and full of the knowledge of a 
great patriotic duty well performed. 

The American Red Cross Society still con- 
tinues the good work that has been done ever 
since the United States entered into the war, 
and every troop train that passes through this 
city is met by the willing workers of the Red 
Cross, and coffee, cakes, sandwiches, cigars, 
cigarettes and other small luxuries dear to the 
hearts of soldier boys are provided. It is a 
very pleasin(i sight on a fine summer evening to 
see the soldiers detrain for a short time and 
exercise themselves on a temporary parade 
ground near the tracks of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad and, finally, line up in front of 
the refreshment tables in charge of the white- 
uniformed ladies. After one company has been 
served, it marches to its train and is off to its 
destination, feeling grateful for the attention 
that has been given. Then another company 
falls in line for its share; and so it goes, on 
nearly all the time. 

Too much praise cannot be given to the Red 
Cross for this great work it is doing all over the 
world. It rec^tly has built a shower bath 
close to the railroad tracks, so that the passing 
troops can avail themselves of a refreshing bath 
before proceeding on their way. 

The T street bridge, crossing the Baltimore 
and Ohio track, is a splendid place from which 
to see these maneuvers and many persons living 
in the neighborhood take advantage of the 
opportunity afforded them. 

Sickness and the draft are still depleting our 
force, making it incumbent on those remaining 
to put their shoulders to the wheel and keep 
things going. Our night yard clerk, Paul E. 
Lee, has just returned from an attack of sick- 
ness, which laid him up for several days, and 
delivery clerk C. R. Heller is still confined to 
his home seriously ill. We are glad to welcome 



Paul after his illness and hope soon to extend 
the same greetings to our veteran delivery 
clerk, Mr. Heller. 




COMBINATION WORK S Ul Tl 



"THE MOST COMFORTABLE WORK GARMENT IN THE WORLD' 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 

E. C. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
W. C. MoNTiGNANi, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
Laura E. Lingamfelter, Stenographer, Mainte- 
nance of Way Department 

Division Artist 
Mable R. Crawford, Tonnage Clerk, Division 
Accountant's Ojjice 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Deneex Chairman, Superintendent 

T. K. Faherty Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welshonce Trainmaster, West End 



62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




MR. AND MRS. CARL WHITE AND 
DAUGHTER, LENORE 



E. C. Ghoveh .Trainmaster, East End 

L. J. WiLMOTH Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

W. T. Hughes Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbauoh Division Operator 

Dr. J. a. Dorner Medical Examiner 

Dr. J. H. Mayer Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

W. D. Strouse Joint Agent 

L. O. Miller Car Foreman, East End 

R. A. TuLL Car Foreman, We-st End 

F. L. Leyh Storekeeper 

E'. A. Workman Storekeeper 

Robert Childers Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Azent 

I. S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. ScH.MiDT Captain of Police 

F. A. Tatlor Ma.ster Carpenter 

W. L. Stevenh ^hop Clerk 

W. C. Montkjnani. Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
M. E. Mullin. . .Absiatunt Maater Mechanic, Kcyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. C. Hauser Conductor 

F. Haddix Engmeer 

II. H. Grimm ,1' 

J. D. Dekibaiuwi Machinist 

C. W. RoBiNHON Car In.spector 

V. B. Katmke Yard Brakeinan 

Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association 
of Cumberland, Md. 

I'HEHIDENT 

(Jrifun a. McGinn (;iiicf CMc-rk to Superintendent 

Vk.bI'Rbhii>enth 

F. F. Hanlky Division EngincM^r 

T R Htkwart Mawt or Mechanic 

e' C;.' I)RAWBAi <iii DiviHi.m Operiitor 

H. D. ScHMiUT Captain of i'olico 

A J Kkllv General lurdinaster 



Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secretary 

C. W. Fries Chief Clerk to Division Accountant 

On this page is reproduced a photograph of 
Carl White, his wife and their eldest daughter, 
Lenore E. White. Mr. White was injured May 
7. His skull was fractured, he lost his left arm, 
his hip was injured, his face bruised and dis- 
figured and he lost all sense of smell. His 
recovery is regarded as remarkable by his 
friends. 



Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

Mrs. Mamie E. Cushman and John W. Grant, 
a Baltimore and Ohio veteran, were married 
in Hagerstown, August 1. 

Sergeant Paul Sylvester Meshley and Miss 
Ella Elizabeth Martin, of this city, were mar- 
ried in Martinsburg June 30. Sergeant Meshley 
was formerly a clerk for the Baltimore and Ohio. 
Last March he was called in the draft and was 
sent to Camp Lee. 

Joseph Odell Knaggs, a retired Baltimore 
and Ohio veteran employe, died at liis home in 
Martinsburg on July 1. Mr. Knapp was born 
at Winchester, Va., seventy-two years ago. 
He moved to Martinsburg when a young man 
and entered the employ of the Baltimore and 
Ohio, spending practically his entire useful life 
in its employ. His death w'as due to paralysis. 
The fimeraf services were held in the First 
United Brethren Church and conducted by 
Rev. Dr. W. F. Gruver. Buriel was in Green 
Hill Cemetery. 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 
E. S. Jenkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

C. F. Schroder, Oyerator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 

Hugh Wilson Chairman, Superintendent, Gnifton 

B. Z. Holverstott Assistant Superintendent, Grafton 

E. Bartlett Trainnia»(er, Fairmont 

John Niland Trainmaster, Grafton 

W. C. Deeoan Trainmaster, Weston 

J. McCluno Trainmaster, Grafton 

.1. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Grafton 

C. E. Dothon Roud Foreman, Grafton 

G. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton 

II. L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton 

.1. O. .\1artin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg 

Dr. C'. a. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton 

Dr. I-;. A. Fleetwood Medical Examiner, Clarksbuig 

V. H. Phinney Agent, Grafton 

.1. D.Anthony Agent, Fairmont 

S. H. Weli.h Agent, Clarksburg 

M. .1. TioHB Road F( reman of Engines, Fairmont 

P. M. Marwh Road Foreman of Engines, Weston 

.1. P. Ryan Agent, We.ston 

T. F.. NuziiM Storekeeper, (Jrafton 

.1. O. Whohlky Engineer, Fairmont 

W. 11. Kklly Machini.'<t, Grafton 

C. BuR»)Y BraUeman, Cirafton 

k! E. Yerkey Conductor, Clark.sbuig 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 




E. J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon 

W. E. Clayton Assistant Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

J. W. Thornhill. Leading Car Inspector, Fairmont 

L. V. Atha Conductor, Grafton 

E. L, Pendergast Machinist, Fairmont 




Wheeling Division 

Correspondents 

C. F. Miller, Office of Superintendent, Wheel- 

ing, W. Va. 

D. F. Allread, Agent, Folsom, W. Va. 

John C. Lee, General Secretary Y. M. C. A., 
Benwood Junction, VV. Va. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. V. Smith Superintendent 

A. H. Woerner Division Engineer 

F. C. ScHORNDORFER Ma.stor Mechanic 

C. M ALONE Trainmaster 

M.J. Wal8h Road Foreman of Engines 

M. E. Cartwright Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

F. M. Garber Car Foreman 

Dr. D. L. Norris Medical Examiner 

H. H.Tederick Track Supervisor 

H. K. Reid Engineer 

G. E. Gate WOOD Conductor 

L. O. SwANN Fireman 

H. Parker Machinist Helper 

L. C. Nichols Brakeman 

J. R. Padden Secretary 

The picture opposite is that of H. A. Ingram 
and his bride. Mr. Ingram was formerly em- 
ployed by the Baltimore and Ohio at Wheeling, 
W. Va., as chief clerk to tlie division engineer, 
which position he held for about three months, 
when he was called by Uncle Sam. Mr. Ingram 
was located at Camp Meade, Md., until recently 
and has sailed for overseas duty. His many 
friends will be surprised to learn of his embarka- 
tion on the sea of matrimony. 

William Chisholm, former clerk in the car 
distributer's office at Wheeling, has accepted a 
position in the Fuel Department, as fuel super- 
visor, with headquarters at Wheeling. Mr. 
Chisholm for a year had been employed in the 
car distributer's office, and his many friends 
will be glad to hear of his rapid progress. 

Miss Caroline Nolte, who was employed as 
stenographer in the division engineer's office 
for the past nine months, has accepted a posi- 
tion as stenographer to the commercial freight 
agent. Miss Mildred Cogley has succeeded 
Miss Nolte. 

E. V. Smith, superintendent, after spend- 
ing two weeks' vacation at Mackinac Island, 
Mich., has returned and taken up his duties. 



Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 
S. S, RouscH, Office of Superintendent 
Miss Helen Wright, Office of Division Engineer 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J . W . Root Superintendent 

F. G. MoRAN Trainmaster 

J. G. KiRCHER Road Foreman of Engines 

O. J. Kellv Master Mechanic 

L. E. Haislip Division Engineer 




PRIVATE AND MRS. H. A. INGRAM 



F. R. Davis Terminal Trainmaster 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

E. Chapman Captain of Police 

F. A. Carpenter Agent, Parkersburg 

S. E. Eastburn Agent, Yardmaster, Huntington 

H. F. Owens Secretary 

Rotating Members 

P. M. Roe Engineer 

O. W. McCarty Fireman 

H. Neal Conductor 

M, F. Caldwell Brakeman 

A. C. Smith Car Department 

C. R. Taylor Locomotive Department 

J. E. Rosier Stores Department 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, G. B. Gymer, Secretary to 
Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. B. Green Chairman, Superintendent 

G . B . G YMER Secretary 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

J.J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. J. Head Trainmaster 

J. C. Hahn Trainmaster 

J. Fitzgerald Trainmaster 

G. R. Galloway Master Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. H. Kaiser Road -Foreman of Engines 

C. H. Cotton Traveling Fireman 

E. G. Slater Signal Supervisor 

W. H. Dean Storekeeper 

G. J. Maisch Division Claim Agent 

Dr. a. a. Church Medical Examiner 

M. E. Tuttle Division Operator 

A. J. Bell Terminal Agent 

L. H. Douglass Master Carpenter 

T, L. C.^lcotb Supcrvi.sor 



64 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



L. C. SwANSON Supervisor 

J. Drennan Supervisor 

J. I. Malone Supervisor 

A. H. Gensley Terminal Trainmaster, Cleveland 

T. McDermott Terminal Trainmaster, Lorain 

H. C. Batchelder Terminal Trainmaster, Akron 

B. C. Meek Relief Agent 

J. P. Cooper Relief Agent 

Rotating Members 

F. E. Weeks Dispatcher, Cleveland 

P. EsposiTO Section Foreman, Akron 

T. Ridley Carpenter Foreman, Akron 

W. L. Cutter Engineer, Lorain 

E. C. Havtland Engineer, Cleveland 

T. Menke Fireman, Lorain 

W. E. Butts Conductor, Lorain 

D. Robinson Brakeman, Lorain 

N. WiLBOis .Yard Conductor, Akron 

\V. Messmer Chief Car Inspector, Lorain 

E. Jones Chief Car Inspector, Cleveland 

J. J. Hurley Enginehouse Foreman, Cleveland 

V. Lucas Steel Car Foreman, Lorain 

J. J. McNeil Machinist, Lorain 



Effective July 1, general superintendent 

E. W. Scheer and staff, having jurisdiction 
over the Cleveland, New Castle, Newark and 
Chicago Divisions, established offices in the 
passenger station at Cleveland. We bid them 
a hearty welcome and assure them of the loyal 
support of each employ of the Cleveland Divi- 
sion. To care for divisional offices vacated for 
general superintendent and staff, offices have 
been arranged on the fovirth floor of passenger 
station for the medical examiner, police de- 
partment, division claim agent and tax agent. 
We now also have a large room on this floor 
where meetings will be held. 

Train supervisor J. E. Fahy recently made 
a trip to New York to see his son, J. D. Fahy, 
furloughed coal clerk, who is enlisted in the 
13oth Field Artillery, on the eve of his depar- 
ture for "over there." Miss Esther Spitler 
accompanied supervisor Fah3^ We wonder 
why? Card has been received advising safe 
arrival in England of the soldier. 

News has also been received that the follow- 
ing employes have arrived safely on foreign 
soil: G. W. Gordon, maintenance of way clerk, 
Cleveland; F. S. Scroggie, division account- 
ant's office, Cleveland. 

Assistant agent Frederick McCormick, at 
Brooklyn station, has been furloughed for 
military duty. He enlisted in the infantry and 
at present is located at Camp Nicholl, New 
Orleans, La. Good luck "Mac." 

Mrs. Mac Pcterman has been appointed 
assistant agent at Brooklyn, Ohio, in place of 

F. McCormick, furloughed. 

W. M. Pe(;bles, report clerk in superinten- 
dent's office at (Jleveland, has been fiirlonglied 
ff)r military service and is now in traiiiiii'z at 
(/'amp Sherman, ( 'liillicothe, Ohio. Miss lOdiia 
M. Nye, stenograph(!r, has been i)rorn()fed to 
position of report clerk. 

Miss Edythe Singleton and Miss Mildred 
Lightner hav(! rec(!ntly been employed as 
8tcnograi)hers in snp(!rinten(l(!nt's office. 




MACHINISTS McKAY AND O'NEILL 



Otto Kirstein, the late chief night clerk at 
Clark Avenue station, Cleveland, has taken a 
leave of absence to spend a short time in Uhrichs- 
ville, Ohio. It is understood that when he 
leaves, Uhrichsville will be minus one of its 
popular yoimg ladies, and the boys of the Colum- 
bus Street branch are preparing to congratu- 
late him on his return home with his young 
bride. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark 

J. P. Dorse Y Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Newark 

C. R. DiEMAR Division Engineer, Newark 

R. A. Vernon Road Foreman of Engines, Newark 

W. D. Johnston .Master Mechanic, Newark 

A. R. Claytor Division Claim Agent, Newark 

D. J. Host T. M. & C. T. D., Columbus 

CD. Miller Shopman, Newark 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner, Newark 

F. Backenstos Conductor, Newark 

W. H. Rlssler Fireman, Newark 

L. C. Decker Engineer, Newark 

O. A. Collins Car Repairer, Newark 

F. Streak Blacksmith, Newark 

D. E. Shock Yard Conductor, Newark 



Above is likeness of machinists McKay and 
O'Neill, employes of the lower machine shop at 
Newark. They are very popular young men 
among the employes of Newark shop. 

Reproduced on next page is cut of Herbert 
Rine, secretary to division engineer at Newark. 
"Heavy," as h(^ is familiarly known, always has 
a i)leasant smile for everyone and is an all- 
around good fellow. 

Another })hotogra})h on that page shows 
switch! (>n(l(ir J. W. Wray, who is employed in 
Newark yard on west end lead. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYESIMAGAZINE 



G5 




NEWARK DIVISION WRECK TRAIN AND CREW 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 

P. E. Weimer, Office of Superintendent, Connells- 
ville 

S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 
Connellsville 

C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Assistant Superinten- 
dent, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

M. H. Broughton Chairman, Superintendent 

C. M. Stone Assistant Superintendent 

A. E. McVicKER Trainmaster 

A. P.WiLLUMS Division Engineer 

G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. F. H. Weidemann Medical Examiner 

G. M. Tipton Freight Agent 

W. G. Carter Freight Agent 




HERBERT RINE 



C. A. Albright Freight Agent 

H. B. Pigman Division Operator 

F. T. Robinson Engineer 

A. G. Watson Fireman 

J. E. Leckemby Conductor 

J. T. Deneen Brakeman 

H. T. Robinson Machinist 

J. G.Percy Boilermaker 

S. M. May Road Foreman of Engines 

J. S. Gilmore Trainmaster 

J. J. Ryland Secretary 




SWITCH TENDER J. W. WRAY, 
NEWARK DIVISION 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



66 

Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondent, C, J. Kessler, Car Accountant^ s 
Office, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 

T. J. Brady .Chairman, Superintendent 

T. VV. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

J. M. MuEHLBAUER Secretary 

H. H. Marsh Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

R. B. Stout Superintendent of Shops 

_A. J. Weise General Car Foremen 

•F. Bryne Claim Clerk 

W. F. Deneke Terminal Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. a. J. BossYNS .Medical Examiner 

G. S. Dietz Brakeman 

Pittsburgh local freight station has many 
boys in military service. The following have 
been put on the station's roll of honor: Charles 
Schuckert, Thomas Powell, Irwin A. Miller, 

H. H. Blumenschein, Hugh Meenan, George J. 
Balkey, Frank Dudas, Earl Seitz, Thomas Cur- 
ran, Frank Dehn, Oscar Newhauser. 

Miller and Dudas are overseas and the others 
are all anxious to get over and into the scrap as 
quickly as possible. Hugh Meenan, who was 
not of draft age, being just nineteen when he 
enlisted, is at Carlstrom field, Arcadia, Fla. 
A portion of a letter recently received from him 
is as follows: 

"I am having a fine time and never felt better 
in my life. Was up in the air 8,000 feet today. 
It's a great life, whether you weaken or not. 
Am working on an air-plane crew as wingman, 
but as yet am just an ordinary private." 

Earl Seitz, who was formerly receiving clerk, 
is at Camp Forest, Ga., and is delia:hted with 
the life. Had he known it was so fine he says 
he would have enlisted a year ago. He has 
gained twelve poimds in weight. 

"Tom" Curran, formerly chief receiving clerk, 
has been transferred to the Medical Detach- 
ment at Camp Lee and expects to go over very 
soon. 

The Pittsburgh Division subscribed $4,527.38 
to the second Red Cross campaign. 

Philip A. McMahon, former secretary to Mr. 
lirady, has arrived safe in France, "Phil" is now 
counting the number of Huns that the Yankee 
boys an; knocking down. "Phil" considers this 
a very hard job. 

The myst(;ry of conductor "Dick" Graham's 
smile has been solv(;d. It has been discovered 
that he is the proud grandfather of a ten-pound 
boy. We expect to sec him braking with Grand- 
father "Dick" in a short time. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Pobinson a girl. 
"Hill" Hobinson is a brak(!man in Demmler yard 
;md is a very [)rr)ud father, (^onaral ulat ions, 
"J3ill," old boy. 

R. P. Bledso(! has been appointed ciptain of 
poIic(!, vice John (Jorss, to sut)erinten(i(;nt of 
police, with headcjuurters at Pitlsljurgh, Pa. 



R. P. Canty has been appointed baggage 
agent at Pittsburgh, Pa., vice J. W. Umler^ who 
was named traveling baggage agent. 

J. J. Downs has been appointed trainmaster 
of the P. & W. District. "Joe" is wearing a 
broad smile. 

Miss Loretta Kinney, stenographer in the 
superintendent's office, has returned from a 
trip to New York. She said farewell to a 
friend leaving for France. 

Miss Gertrude Clay, former C. D. clerk in the 
car accountant's office at Pittsburgh, Pa., has 
been promoted to stenographer in the superin- 
tendent's office. 

Miss Elizabeth Lucy, of the superintendent's 
office, has been promoted to stenographer in the 
general superintendent's office. 

T. J. Mimnaugh, gang foreman at Demmler, 
Pa., has bought a new flivver and we have 
noticed that there are quite a few telephone 
poles now missing around Turtle Creek. " Better 
keep her on the road, "Tom." 

Roy Shaw, yard clerk at Demmler yard, is 
just back from a two weeks' vacation. We 
understand that he went as far as Olympia Park, 
Versailles, Pa. 



New Castle Division 

Correspondents 
W.W. McGAUGHEY,CAie/ Clerk to Superintendent 
C. S. Maynard, Operator, Chardon. Ohio 
V. P. McLaughlin, Operator, BD Tower, Akron 
Junction, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



C. W. VanHorN Chairman, Superintendent 

C. P. Angell Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

D. W. Cronin Division Engineer 

A. H. Hodges Master Mechanic 

Jameh Aiken .*. Agent, Youngstown. O. 

Dr. F. Dorsey Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne Claim Agent 

F. H. Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahill Division Operator 

W. Damron Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Master Carpenter 

J. J. FiSHBURN Secretary 

E. J. Hunt Road Conductor, New Castle Junction 

G. C. Anderson Road Fireman, New Castle Junction 

S. (). Lewis Road Engineer, New Castle Junction 

N. Thatcher Macliinist, New Castle Junction 

(J. H. Glenn Yard Engineer, Haselton, O. 

V. D. Lancaster Yard Conductor, Painesville, (). 

MiBS E. R. B100ER8TAKF Clerk, New Castle Junction 



Miss Pearl D.Clark. .Chief Clerk to Agent, Youngstown,0. 

On August 2 Miss Delia Hinkle was married 
to A. P. Alexander, agent at Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio. The c(;remony was i)erf()rme(i in th(^ 
bride's home in Akron. Mr. Alexander, prior 
lo filling the agency at Cuyahoga Falls, was 
r(!lief agent on the New Castle Division and is 
well known to everybody along the line. He 
certainly has the best wishes of th(^ officials and 
employes on the division. On his wedding trip 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



67 




BERNARD ("BUBBY") JOHNSON 



on No. 67, the couple accidentally ran into a band 
which was going to Rittman for some cele- 
bration, and when the musicians discovered 
that a bride and groom were on board, they 
gave "Alex" and his bride a very nice serenade. 
However, ''Alex" "beat it" to the other car, 
being unable to "face the music." After a 
wedding trip to Baltimore, Philadelphia and 
New York, they are "at home" in Akron. 

Frederick Claudius, of Brookneal, Va., was 
fatally injured July 13 at Akron Junction while 
switching in yards by being knocked from a car. 
This was his second day in the yard. He was 
twenty-one years old. His body was shipped 
to his home for interment. 

A telephone has been installed in trainmen's 
room at BD Tower. This relieves operators of 
considerable work in the way of calling Pennsyl- 
vania operators to get clearances for westbound 
trains. 

Engineer W. S. Hall and his wife visited their 
son at Camp Lee, Virginia, where he is a private 
in the National Army. 

Frank Webber, one of the oldest employes at 
Akron Junction yard, is confined to his home 
with rheumatism. 

"Clem" Emerick and Sherman Mains were 
confined to their homes on account of sick- 
ness. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, O. V. Kincade, Assistant Chief 
Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. H.Jackson Chairman, Superintendent, Garrett, Ind. 

T. J. Rogers. . . .Vice Chairman, Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

J. E. Fisher Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

John Tordella Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111. 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind. 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

W. F. MoRAN Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

D. Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

W. E. Fhazier Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

Dr. W. a. Funk Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

Dr. C. W. Hedrick Medical Examiner, Willard, O. 

J. F. MiLBURN Secretary Y, M. C. A., Willard, O. 

John Draper Freight Agent, Chicago, III. 

Gertrude Manion Secretary 

F. L. ScHLOTTER Relief Agent 

A. A. Armstrong Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

J. B. Spencer Fireman, Garrett, Ind. 

H. W. Marsh Conductor, Garrett, Ind. 

B. A. Williams Brakeman, Garrett, Ind. 

H. W. McCuRDY Machinist, Garrett, Ind. 

C. F. Ansel Machinist, Willard, O. 

F. Martin Machinist, South Chicago, 111. 

D. J. Brubaker Car Builder, South Chicago, III. 

J. F. Pence Car Inspector, Garrett, Ind. 

J. F. Drinkwater Yard Brakeman, Willard, O. 

Cleon Hamm Tool-room Attendant, Garrett, Ind. 

Emma Schwab Tool room Attendant, Willard, O. 



Below is a snapshot of two ''sons of the 
Chicago Division." On the left is William 
Bradly, who was employed as a machinist and 
on account of an injury was transferred to the 
Stores Department as oil distributer, where he 
has been employed for thirty years. Mr. 
Bradly is under storekeeper J. T. Dowell and 
has charge of one of the best equipped oil 
houses on the System and is considered a very 
competent man. On the right is James Mc- 




WILLIAM BRADLY AND JAMES McCLAIN 



68 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 





IN GENERAL FOREMAN'S OFFICE AT SOUTH CHICAGO. LEFT TO RIGHT: MISSES FLORENCE 
CAMERON, ANN SKILLING AND MARIE KRAEGER 



Clain, who has been in the Motive Power De- where they spent two weeks' vacation with 
partment for fifty years and every one knows relatives and friends. Report comes to Garrett 
"Jimmie." 



The photograph reproduced on pajre 67 shows 
Bernard ("Bubby") Johnson, the bright son of 
captain of police T. Johnson, stationed at Wil- 
lard, Ohio. "Bubby" is shown on guard, de- 
fending his war garden against any Huns who 
might stray into Willard. As indicated by 
his attire, ''Bubby" has a leaning towards the 
naval service. 

At n.40 p. m., Tuesday, July 2, R. N. Miller, 
Chicago Division passenger conductor, died 
at his home, 504 South Randolph Street, 
Garrett, Ind. Mr. Miller had enjoyed the best 
of health until his brief, but fatal illness. He 
had made an automobile trip to Huntertown, 
Ind., Monday evening, returning at 11.15 p. m., 
feeling as good as usual. At three o'clock Tues- 
day morning he aroused Mrs. Miller and com- 
phiined of being sick, the doctor was called, l)ut 
Mr. .Miller soon became unconscious and his con- 
dition gradually gr(!vv worse until the (^nd came. 
Mr. Miller was bom at Hiclimond, Northamp- 
ton County, Pa., Noveml)er 0, 1860. In 1886 
he and his brother, A. P. Miller, also a conduc- 
tor on the Chicago Division, came to Garrett 
and enter(;d the s(!rvice of the lialtimore and 
Ohio Railroad as l)rakernen, in which capacity 
R. N. Miller had starved until Fcibruary 6, 1890, 
when he was promoted to frciight conductor. 
He was i)romote(l to passenger conductor 
August 1, 1008. 

C. Ratri(!, clii(;f clerk to sup(;rint(!nd(!nt, and 
family have just returned from Mendon, Mich., 




U N. MILLKR 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



69 




M. ALTHER MAKING ADDRESS AT FLAG DAY EXERCISES, SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL. 



that parties who have been in the habit of spend- 
ing vacations in and around Mendon are seeking 
other resorts due to the fact that Mr. Ratrie 
caught all of the finny tribe in the streams 
thereabouts. 

Hicksville, Ohio, Chicago Division station, 
has seven of its employes in Uncle Sam's 
service. Lieutenant W. C. Blalock and E. J. 



Blalock are now in France and F. R. Clark, 
C. C. Klingler, S. D. McKinley and R. G. Crow 
are at various training camps, while M. A. 
Longsworth is stationed at Great Lakes Naval 
Training School. 

The picture reproduced just below of lady 
clerks in the South Chicago offices was taken 
on Flag Day. 




WATCHING FLAG DAY EXERCISES AT SOUTH CHICAGO 



70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




FIRE DEPARTMENT DRILL AT CHICAGO TERMINAL 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

Under the new plan of coordination, C. R. 
Hampton, for a number of years agent for the 
Baltimore and Ohio at Union Stock Yards, 
Chicago, has been appointed yard superinten- 
dent for all railroads under government control 
entering the stock yards. 

William Damron, terminal trainmaster at 
New Castle Junction, made a call on friends in 
this section recently. 

Oscar E. Anderson, chief clerk in general 
foreman Quigley's office at this station, left 
July 15 to take a position as chief clerk with 
general master mechanic Malthaner at Cleve- 
land. Mr. Anderson enters upon his new duties 
with the best wishes of his many friends at 
South Chicago. C. R. Pilgrim, formerly chief 
clerk in car foreman's office at Garrett, has 
been transferred to fill the vacancy. 

D. Hannihan has succeeded Frank King as 
day enginehouse foreman. Mr. King having 
been transferred to Seymour, Ind. 

E. J. Leedy has been appointed gang foreman 
in the car department, vice L. Stazewski, who 
has joined the forces of Uncle Sam, and is at the 
Sweeney Auto School, Kansas City, Mo. 

L. Napierkowski, formerly gang foreman, car 
department, now with the 13th Infantry, writes 
from Camp Fremont, California, that army life 
is great. "Louie" has taken on ten poimds 
since joining the forces of Uncle Samuel. 

Yardman William F. Behn, who is an accom- 
plished musician, has enlisted in the Navy and 
will b(!come a member of Sousa's Band at 
(ir(!at Lakes. A. J. Wetherton and L. D. Sin- 
clair, also employes, left recently for Camp 
(Gordon. 

V. A. Panks has been appointed M. C. B. 
clerk, vice I^dward Schaad, resigned. 

Car distributer Paul Wegener, with Mrs. 
Wegener and son, spent his vacation on the 
Kankakee River, Indiana. 

T. E. Kernan, yardmasfcsr at Wolf Lake, and 
Mrs. Kcrnnn h:\vv. returned from a motor trip 
1o Torr>iilo, ( '.Miiiid:!, via Niagara Falls. 



Chief clerk Murphy of the trainmaster's 
office, with Mrs. Murphy and children, has 
returned from a vacation spent at his former 
home in Appleton, Wis. 

Miss Florence Cameron, of the general fore- 
man's office, spent her vacation at Camp 
Wheeler, Macon, Ga., where her brother. 
Lieutenant Cameron, is an instructor. 

As coal clerk William Gintert, of this office, 
was leaving for his vacation, word was re- 
ceived of the death of Mrs. Gintert's sister in 
Los Angeles, Cal. Her body was sent to 
Findlay, Ohio, for burial, Mr. and Mrs. Gin- 
tert being present. 

Others who have returned from vacations 
and report fine times, are road foreman of 
engines Brubaker, and clerk John Kendrick. 
Miss Ann Skilling has also returned from a 
trip through the east. 

Yardmaster Weber has been passing the 
cigars around the yard and office all on account 
of a fine new daughter at his home in Parkside. 

J. S. Cusick, our interchange clerk, repre- 
sented the Chicago Division at the convention 
of the Relief Department, held in Cleveland, 
Ohio, recently. 



Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, W. E. Buckmaster, Chief Elec- 
trician, Lincoln Street, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. L. NicHOi-8 Chairman Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster, Chicago 

G. P. Pai.meu Division Engineer, Buildina 

R. L. Paithorn Aasistant Engineer, Huilding 

A. Ckaw Division Claim Agent, Building 

A. R. OsBOKNE Captain of Police, Building 

C. L. Heglky Examiner, Building 

H. McDonald Suporvisor, Building 

Wm. Hogan Supervisor, Building 

F, K. Moses • Master Mechanic 

F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines, Roboy Street 

Charles Ehpino Master Carpenter, Building 

Dr. E. J. Hughes Medical Examiner, Building 

C. O. SiEFERT Signal Supervisor, Building 

E. J. BoYLE Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

Edward Mattin(JLY General Car Foreman 

D. M. Julian Car Foieman, Chicago 

Ray PJlder Car Foreman, East Chicago 

Jl. F. James Engine Foreman, Jilue Island 

'I\ FiNNON Helper, lOast Chicago 

W. A. Welsh lOngine Foreman, Robey 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 



D. Flynn Locomotive Engineer, East Chicago 

J. GoULDiNG Locomotive Engineer, Blue Lsland 

John Latshaw Locomotive Engineer, Robey Street 

J. Crawford Machinist, Robey Street 

William Schmel Machinist Apprentice, East Chicago 

G. Pappelo Boilermaker, Robey Street 



Miss Catherine Cumminr^s, roundhouse clerk, 
. has been operated on for appendicitis. Last 
reports state that she is improving. 

Owing to the resignation of Miss Gertrude 
Smith, timekeeper at Lincohi Street, the follow- 
ing changes have been made: A. Speelman, 
joint roundhouse clerk to timekeeper; Miss 
Virginia Hall, engine house clerk to joint round- 
house clerk; Miss Catherine Cummings, dis- 
tribution clerk to engine house clerk. The 
vacancy at the distribution desk has been filled 
by Miss Birdie Rosenberg, sister to Frederick 
J. and George Rosenberg, engine house foremen 
at Lincoln Street and East Chicago, respec- 
tively. 

Austin Weiner, formerly clerk to chief elec- 
trician and piecework inspector, is now at 
Camp Jackson, Columbia, S. C. Austin has 
alwa3^s been fond of horses, so now he is evi- 
dently in his proper element, as he is attending 
the Stable Sergeants' School, where he is being 
taught a veterinarian course. He is attached 
to the 7th Regiment, F. A. R. D. He has been 
thoughtful enough to explain that F. A. R. D. 
means Field Artillery Replacement Depot. He 
is hoping to be sent overseas soon. 

On preceding page is a picture of the fire 
department of Lincoln Street. This crew is ever 
on the alert and never has been caught napping. 
Reading from left to right, those in the photo- 
graph are, F. Ferguson, chief; O. B. Shaner, 
terminal engineer. This photograph was taken 
while the snow was piled high in the terminal 




MOURNS HIS MASTER, F. M. FERGUSON 



in the spring, but the firefighters do not mind 
the chilling blasts or anything else when work 
is to be done. 

One of our veterans and retired pensioners, 
F. M. Ferguson, who was stationed at State Line 
Bridge for a number of years as switch tender, 
passed into the Great Beyond at his residence, 
125 North Herman Street, Hammond, Ind., on 
July 25, and was laid to rest in Oak Hill Ceme- 
tery July 27. The services were conducted 
under the auspices of the G. A. R., of which the 
deceased had been a member for a long time. 
Mr. Ferguson was born July 4, 1848, and at the 
call for volunteers in '61 was one of the first to 
tender his services, enlisting in Company L, 
77th Cavalry, and served until wounded at 
Gettysburg. He had been in the service of the 
Company since_ 1893, with the exception of a 
very short period, and was one of the loyal 
employes at the time of the A. R. U. trouble in 
'94, being stationed at State Line as crossing 
watchman and was not molested at any time 
while attending to his duties at this trying time. 
The picture shows Mr. Ferguson and his trick 
dog Buster, which were familiar figures to the 
trainmen who stopped or passed at the bridge. 
Mr. Ferguson's son, E. F. Ferguson, is assistant 
freight agent at Robey Street. 

The many friends of C. Clough, at Lincoln 
Street, were pleased to have him as a visitor. 
Mr. Clough is in the merchant marine service 
of the government and has made several trips 
across the Atlantic and back. The vessel to 
which Mr. Clough is attached was loading at 
Baltimore. 

The following men, who were formerly in the 
office of the assistant freight agent at Robey 
Street, are in the service of Uncle Sam: C. E. 
Partridge, "Somewhere in France," writes that 
he is well and enjoying the service immensely 
now that they have the Hims on the run. C. J. 
Breen, who enlisted in the Marines, was last 
reported at Norfolk, Va., ready to go across 
and over the top. M. W. Kuhuen, whose 
picture is shown in a group on another page, was 
sent to Camp Wheeler at Macon, Ga. He ex- 
presses himself as highly pleased with his ex- 
periences and that he has been assigned to a gun 
squad operating an instrument used in measur- 
ing angles to get correct range of the enemy, 
and that if he gets across he will account for a 
few Huns. 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Operator, DO 
Office, Chillicothe, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



E. W.Hoffman Chairman, Superintendent 

T. E. Banks Trainmaster 

William Graf Road Foreman of Engines 

W. F. Hayes Master Meciianic 

Samuel Pulliam Assistant Division Engineer 

Dr. J. G. Selby Medical Examiner 

L. A. Pausch Supervisor 

E. E. Johnson Agent, Athens, O. 

C. S. Hart Condudor 



72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




RIP-TRACK FORCE AT SEYMOUR, INDIANA 



Howard Young Brakeman 

C. E. FoGELMAN Engineer 

R. Collins Fireman 

S. Leatherwood Yard Conductor 

F. Seekatz Machinist 

Thomas Tull Piecework Inspector 

E. C. Cole Captain of Police 



Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent , Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

A. A. Iams Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. B. PuRKHiSER Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

H. S.Smith Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

C. E. Herth Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

J. M. Shay Master Mechanic, Cincinnati, O. 

S. A. Rogers Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind. 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind. 

P. T. HoRAN General Foreman, Seymour, Ind. 

E. Massman Agent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Sands Agent, Louisville, Ky. 

J. E. 0'Do.\i Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O. 

E. G. .Masher Secretary, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Allen Engineer, Louisville, Ky. 

A. L. DeCa.mp Track Foreman, Charlestown, Ind. 

H. Purkhiser Conductor, Seymour, Ind. 

Frank Wells Fireman, Seymour, Ind. 

On another page is printed a photograph of 
Thomas R. Scooj)mirc, operator, fiirloughed for 
military service June 18, 1918, and now with 
the Navy at Caml)ridge, Mass. Mr. Scooi)- 
mire has been in the service almost contin- 
uously as clerk, extra ajient and operator and 
operator since August 3, 1912. 

(/. E. Morton, chief clerk to division engineer, 
and wife hav(! just returned from a most en- 
joyable vacation spent at his old home at 
Hinton, VV. \^a. Mr. Morton's par(!nts accom- 
pani(!d them. Mr. Morton is very enthusiastic 
about the fine mountain air. 

S. A. Rogers, road for(!m;iii of engines, is on 
a vacatir)n and will visit St. Louis, Kansas (*ity, 
Hot Springs, Chicago and Kill)urn, Wis. A 



number of the employes at Seymour are anx- 
iously awaiting his return, for when he happens 
to be in off line of road for an evening it is not 
difficult to entice him to the swimming pool in 
City Park and all are very deeply interested 
in the big splash he makes. 

E. G. Masher, secretary to superintendent, 
is on vacation and is visiting St. Louis, Pueblo, 
Denver and Silver Plume, Colorado. The post 
cards are beginning to arrive and upon his 
return he will evidently have something to say 
of the ''wonderful new auto highway to the very 
tip-top of Pike's Peak." 

Quite a number of the girls and boys in the 
division office building are spending their spare 
hours on tennis court on Company property. 
Some are so interested that there is no trouble 
for them to Hooverize, as it is much more fun 
to play than eat. 

The accompanying picture is of E. F. Cross, 
si^rnal maintainer, Nebraska, Ind. He has been 
in the service of the railroad for ten years 
and has its interest at heart at all times. 




E. F. CROSS 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 



He is ever looking for an opportunity to con- 
serve material. He has found along the right of 
way and forwarded to shops for further use at 
various times quite a number of caps lost from 
rod oil cups. 

C. F. Cassin, who entered the service of the 
Baltimore and Ohio as freight brakeman August 
3, 1909, was promoted to conductor October 30, 
1910, and resigned June 10, 1916, enlisted June 
30 last for railroad service overseac. He 
arrived in France the latter part of July. He 
was at Camp Fort Benjamin Harrison for one 
week and is now with Company B, 63rd Engi- 
neers, American Expeditionary Forces. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, W. F. Cochrane, Chief Clerk 
to Supervisor of Terminals 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. H. Meyers Chairman, Superintandent of Terminal 

R. B. FiTZPATRicK Trainmaster 

W. T. Darling Road Foreman of Engines 

I.. A. CoRDTE Assistant Termipal Agent 

Dr. G. R, Gaver Medical Examiner 

J. M. Burke Car Foreman 

H. P. HoGAN General Foreman 

G. A. Bowers Roundhouse Foreman 

J. A, ScHiFFGEN General Foreman 

Rotating Members 
E. R. HoTTEL : Machinist 

H. W. KiRBERT Engineer 

W. F. Mantell Yardmaster 

R. H. Searls Claim Clerk 



Assistant trainmaster Bowns and his wife 
were pleasantly surprised on July 20 by being 
presented with a beautiful silver service and 
a huge bouquet of flowers from the boys of 
Cincinnati Terminal. Mr. Bowns said the 
gifts will ever be a reminder to give the best 
that is in him to the Company and its employes. 
He had just returned from a short vacation, 
which was taken in an endeavor to regain his 
health, which has not been the best of late. 

Walter J. Scott, yard clerk at Elmwood. 
was furloughed for the U. S. Army July 6. 
"Scotty," as he was best known, was an ex- 
ceptionally capable clerk and was always will- 
ing and able to do any work assigned to him. 
He is greatly missed. 

Harry Breckel, formerly in the road service, 
who lost a limb in April, 1917, is now a clerk 
in Elmwood yard office. The boys were glad 
to welcome him back into the service. 

Former agent C. J. Schaefer, now in the 
Medical Corps at Camp Sherman, honored us 
with a visit on July 22. He had many inter- 
esting tales to tell. 

Of course you know Coleman, our efficient 
report clerk. If you don't yon had better 
become acquainted with his imique person- 
ality. You are bound to like him. Well, Cole- 
man has just returned from a vacation. As in 
all things, Coleman always gets his money's 



worth. Ask him how he liked Buffalo, Brooklyn, 
or any other big city you can think of. 

Charles Klienheinz, chief clerk to the general 
foreman at Ivorydale, has returned from a 
very pleasant vacation. 

Below is a photograph of John W. WeithofT, 
formerly yard clerk at Elmwood Place. John 
did not wait to be called, but voluntarily 
enlisted in the Field Artillery of the U. S. Army, 
May 25, after having worked at Elmwood for 
two years. If John makes as good a soldier as 
he did a yard clerk, then Uncle Sam has a 
soldier to be proud of. 

The photograph on page 75 is that of our yard 
force at Elmwood yard, Cincinnati Terminals. 
The short chap who got ''out of bounds" with 
one foot is assistant trainmaster T. J. Bowns. 
You just can't keep "Tommy" from coming to 
the front. 

Engineer T. J. Gallagher; of Cincinnati Ter- 
minals, an old employe of the Baltimore and 
Ohio, has two sons with the colors, Joseph A. 
Gallagher, formerly an employe of the Eagle 
Pitcher Lead Co., and John T. Gallagher, a 
former Baltimore and Ohio employe. Engi- 
neer Gallagher returned recently from a visit 
to Camp Upton, N. Y., where he bade good-bye 
to his youngest son, "Joe," who is with the 
136th Field Artillery. On arrival home he was 
greeted by his other son, Corporal John T. 
Gallagher, with the U. S. Marines, who also 
came home on furlough before leaving for 
France. Engineer Gallagher can be proud of 
his two sons. 




JOHN W. WEITHOFF 



74 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Robert Gabriel, clerk at Ivorydale for the 
last five years has been called to the colors, 
and is now in Uncle Sam's army. 

Howard Heintz, boilermaker at Ivorydale, 
was married on July 20 and left for the army 
July 22. Good luck, Howard. 

Edward Shinners, manager of the Baltimore 
and Ohio rest cars at Ivorydale, has had a 
broad smile on his face since the arrival of a 
eleven and one-half pound baby girl at his 
home. 

V. C. Sheley, roundhouse foreman, is taking 
an extended vacation through the northwest, 
visiting various shops and roundhouses. 

Employes of Gest Street roundhouse are 
mighty proud of their showing in the last Red 
Cross drive. Everyone donated a day's pay. 
They were also 100 per cent, strong in the third 
Liberty loan and are ready for the next drive, 
expecting tc top the mark again. 

With this issue we present to our readers 
and his many friends a photograph of John H. 
Meyers, appointed superiatendent of termi- 
nals, Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 1, succeeding 
E. T. Horn, who has been assigned to other 
duties. The appointment of Mr. Meyers to the 
above position came as a reward for his long 
and faithful service and because he is capable. 
He started with this Company as an operator 
in Cincinnati in 1902 and held positions suc- 
cessively as chief clerk, yardmaster, general 
yardmaster and trainmaster. His many 
friends are mighty glad to hear of this ap- 
pointment. 





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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



75 




YARD FORCE AT CINCINNATI TERMINALS. 



Considerable rivalry exists between Charles 
Taack and Frank Ruwe when discussing the 
products of their respective war gardens. 
While Taack claims the distinction of having 
the finest tomatoes, Ruwe specializes in beans. 
Their gardens are the finest in Hamilton 
County. Let us have more war gardens and 
rivalry of this kind. 

Employes at Storrs repair tracks were 100 
per cent, subscribers to both the third Liberty 
loan and Red Cross, and are now keeping up 
the good work by organizing a War Savings 
society. With Miss Mary Ryan as president 
and H. E. Swepston as secretary and treasurer, 
the club now boasts of forty members and 
reports the sale of $30 worth of stamps for 
the first week. 

A farewell party was tendered Oliver H, 
Royse, Friday, July 19, in honor of his departure 
for Camp Johnson, Columbia, S. C, where he 
will be inducted into the National Army. 

Philip Marsland, laborer foreman, who has 
been laid up in the hospital for about four weeks, 
reported for duty July 13. 

All employes at Storrs were sorry to learn 
of the death of their fellow workman, John 
Ritter, who has been in the service of the 
railroad for more than forty years. While 
Mr. Ritter has been on the relief for more than 



two years, he always made it his business to 
pay us a visit at least once a month. With the 
death of Mr. Ritter we have lost the oldest 
employe at Storrs. 

In order to assist the Government injits 
preparation of skilled men for duties "over 
there," we have had two squads of drafted 
men training as car repairers for the past 
two weeks. 

T. W. Calvin, assistant trainmaster, has 
just returned from a most enjoyable vacation 
spent in the east and north. 

Miss Kathyrn Weber, of the supervisor of 
terminal's office, spent Sunday in Louisville. 
It is noticed that Miss Weber makes very 
frequent visits to that city, and we are wonder- 
ing what the attraction is. 

J, M. Kelly recently night chief clerk in the 
supervisor of terminal's office, has resigned to 
engage in other business. He has been suc- 
ceeded by Robert Jennings, formerly relief 
yard clerk. 

H. B. Smith left for his old home in Pitts- 
burgh, having been called for service with 
Uncle Sam. The last we heard of "Smithy" was 
that he was "on his way to Berlin." 

The many friends of Mrs. Whiteside, for- 
merly employed in the supervisor of terminal's 



76 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIOIEMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



office, regret her departure for Columbia, S. C, 
where she has gone to remain with her husband 
until such time as he leaves for overseas duties. 
Mr. Whiteside enlisted sometime ago, and 
]Mrs. Whiteside is doing her share towards 
keeping the supplies moving. 



Illinois Division 

Correspondents 

Walter S. Hopkins, Chief Clerk to Division 
Accountant, Flora, 111. 

Omer T. Goff, Secretary to Superintendent, 
Flora, III. 

* Divisional Safety Committee 

C. G. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent 

Omer T. Goff Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

J. W. Odum Trainmaster 

R . E. Chamberlain Division Engineer 

W. F. Harris Master Mechanic 

C. H.Creager Road Foreman 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator 

H. E. Orr Master Carpenter 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor 

M. F. Wyatt Supervisor 

G. H. Singer Agent.'East St. Louis 

C..S. Mitchell Agent, Flora, 111. 

r ««H..r-*>^ Rotating Members l^«^fr> »R^^ 

W. H. Mullen Engineer 

Paul Naney Fireman 

CO. Davis Conductor 

J. E. BuRRis Brakeman 

H. C. Smith Machinist 

George Quayle Machine Man 

Frank O'Shatz Car Inspector 

Ed Widdows Track Foreman 



Superintendent C. G. Stevens returned from 
his vacation July 1, after having spent two 
weeks away from the office. Mr, Stevens spent 
the greater part of his vacation at Washington, 
Indiana, where he has a great many friends. 
He went also to Sumner, Illinois, to visit his 
mother. The entire office force missed him 
very much and we were all glad when he got 
back on the job. 

Night yardmaster Edward Coil says business 
is pretty good around Flora yard at night. 
He says if his engines and himself could be at 
three or four different places working at the 
same time they would get along fine. 

Leonard E. Kellums, C. T. time clerk in 
rlivision accountant's office, suddenly made his 
advent into the matrimonial world about the 
last of June. The bride; was Miss Agnes Sons, 
of Fairfield, Illinois. Mrs. Kellums formerly 
was employed in Flora and has a gr(;at inany 
friends at this place. I'nderstand "Wabash" 
or "Nurge" likes married life fine, as he says 
that there is nothing like it. He fears that he 
is to be sent to Kettle River for several days 
soon, but does not want to leave home that 
long. 

Omer T. Goff", secretary to superintendent 
at I'iora, returned from his vacation July 1, 
after spending two weeks running around over 
the country. While away he visited^( 'hicago. 




$95 an Hour! 

''Every hour I spent on my I. C. S. 
Course has been worth $95 to me! My 
position, my $5,000 a year income, mv 
home, my family's happiness — I owe it all 
to my spare time trainmg with the Inter- 
national Correspondence Schools!" 

Every mail brings letters from setae of 
the two million I. C. S. students telling of 
promotions or increases in salary as the 
rewards of spare time study. 

What are you doing with the hours after 
supper? Can you afford to let them sHp 
by unimproved when you can easily make 
them mean so much? One hour a day 
spent with the I. C. S. will prepare you 
for the position you want in tne work you 
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BOX 8512, SCRANTON, pa! 

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or in the subject, before which I mark X. 

□ BOOKKEEPER 

R. R. Agency Accounting 
R. R, Gen'l Office Acc'tins 
Higher Accounting 
Stenographer and Typist 
Mathematics 
SALESMANSHIP 
ADVERTISING 
Railway Mail Clerk 
CIVIL SERVICE 

Electrician 
ICIectric Wiring 
Electric Lighting 
Electric Railways 
Telegraph Engineer 
Telephone Work 
MINK KOUKMAN on FNfl'R 
Metallurgist or Prospector 
CHI. MIST 

A I TOMOItl I.F. OPE HA'l I.\U 
Auto Repairing 
Good English inSpaniib 
AtiltlCUl.Tl UK |nKr*.ii(.h 
I'uiiltry lUUiiiK ■□ Italian 



□ LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER 
Locomotive Fireman 
Traveling Engineer 
Traveling Fireman 

Air Brake Inspector 
Air Brake Repairman 

□ Round House Foreman 
_j Trainmen and Carmen 
■JKailway Conductor 
•^MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

Mechanical Draftsman 
Machine Shop Practice 
Boiler Maker or Designer 
Stationary Engineer 
Ga» Engine Operating 
CIVIL ENGINl ER 
Surveying end Mapping 
R. R. Constructing 
Bridge Engineer 
ARCHITECT 
Architectural Draftsman 
Contractor and Builder 
Structural Engineer 
Concrete Builder 
TRAFFIC MANAGER 



Present 
Occupation . 



Street 
and No. 



City. 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 



Cleveland, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Cincinnati 
and St. Louis, then, expecting to have a little 
change of environment, he visited a farm in 
Southern Indiana, where he thought he was 
going to rest for about two or three days, but, 
instead of resting, he was handed a pitch fork 
the first day he was there and told that business 
around that place was conducted on the "work 
or fight" basis, so what could he do but get 
out and pitch hay! The next day it was: 
''You can use this team and cultivator. The 
corn field is a little piece down the road. You 
can find it all right." He reports enjoying 
himself a great deal and says that he wished 
that he could stay on the same farm the balance 
of the summ*er. 

Maintenance of way timekeeper W. S. Allen 
is to be transferred from division accountant's 
office at Flora to a similar position in division 
accountant's office at Cumberland, Md. We 
are all very sorry to see "Doc" leave, as he 
and his wife are very popular in Flora and we 
know that they will be missed a great deal. 
They have our wishes for success. 

Chief clerk to superintendent F. A. Conley 
recently returned from his vacation, part of 
which was spent on a farm in Ohio. When he 
got back and told us about the great time he 
had and all the "eats" that were "dished out" 
to him we became "leary" lest he should bid 
us adieu and go back to the same farm to spend 
the rest of his life. We were all very glad to 
see him back on the job and he certainly looked 
a great deal better than when he started. 

The month of July was a busy one for the 
division accountant's office. In addition to 
their entire force working every evening until 
from 10.30 to 12 o'clock, there were several 
of the clerks from the various offices at Flora 
who also passed away their evenings in the 
same office. The big occasion was figuring 
up back pay. Among those from other offices 
who worked evenings were H. M. Hogan, Omer 
T. GofT, Thomas J. McCarthy, Harold F. 
Smith, E. C. Hoffman and W. S. Cooper. 

E. C. Hoffman's address on Sunday is "Some- 
where in St. Louis." We bet "Dutch" has a 
reason. He spent Sunday at Pacific, Mo., a 
few weeks ago. Understand he had a great 
time thej^, but when he came back he was so 
tired that he looked like he had had a long 
sick spell. "Dutch" is an operator in "X" 
office at Flora and is one of the "chosen few" 
who do not have to worry about the office on 
Sunday. 

Thomas J. McCarthy, chief clerk's sten- 
ographer in superintendent's office at Flora, is 
now on his vacation. It is "Mac's" own busi- 
ness where he is spending it. 

Among the prospects for the army are the 
following from the offices at Flora: Frederick 
J. Smith, dispatcher; Frank A. Conley, chief 
clerk; Omer T. Goff, secretary to superinten- 
dent: Harold M. Hogan, car distributer; 
Cressy D. Russell, extra dispatcher; Henry H. 



PATENTS 

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WATSON E. COLEMAN, Patent Lawyer 

624 F Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 



Bruner, file clerk in superintendent's office; 
Robert O. Dykins, trainmaster's clerk; Harold 
F. Smith, road foreman's clerk, and operators 
E. C. Hoffman and J. N. Cherry. We under- 
stand dispatcher Smith is to be commissioned 
as a lieutenant, but others less fortunate will 
probably be called upon to go as privates. 

Ticket agent C. P. Stewart, at Springfield, 
has been commissioned first lieutenant in rail- 
road service in the army and reported at 
Hoboken, N. Y., for service on August 1. Mr. 
Stewart was one of the most popular men on the 
division and was well known by the traveling 
public. Perry has the best wishes of everybody 
on the division and we are all sure that he will 
make good. He is succeeded as ticket agent 
at Springfield by J. V. O'Dea, who for some time 
has been assistant ticket agent at that point. 
Mr. O'Dea is a worthy successor to Mr. Stewart. 

Miss Helen Tipton, comptometer operator 
in division accountant's office, will spend a day 
or two at her home at Rushville, Illinois. It 
is unecessary to state that ''Dimples" will be 
missed by several friends at Flora. 



Toledo Division 

Correspondent, F. M. Drake, Relief Agent 
Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent 

E. J. CoRRELi Vice Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

H. W. Brant Trainmaster 

F. J. Parrish Division Engineer 

L. E. Clayton Division Operator 

M. Dibling Machinist, Lima, O. 

Edward Keefe Road Engineer, Ivorydale, O. 

T. J. McDermott Road Conductor, Dayton, O. 

H. T. Heilman Secretary to Superintendent, Lima, O. 

Dr. F. H. Hutchinson Medical Examiner, Lima, O. 

Dr. R. C. Potter Medical Examiner, East Dayton, O. 



As a protection against railroad property 
being carried away by outside pilferers, a 
standard seven-foot fence of upright board 
construction has been erected and recently 
completed at the East Dayton, Findlay Street, 
yard. The tract of ground enclosed consists 
of about five acres and is to contain lumber 
material such as is used in the construction of 
and repairs to bridges, stations and other 
structures. 

Effective July 2, the interlocking plants pro- 
tecting crossings of the C. C. C. & St L. Rail- 
way and the Erie Railroadjat Tates Point 
were put into operation. 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



78 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



TYPEWRITER SENSATION 

4i4»2^^'r°:;f,x prompt shipment 

* reconstructed, Latest 
Model Visible Typewriter, with Back Spacer, Decimal Tabulator. Two Color 
Ribbon, etc. Every late style feature and modern operating device. Sent 
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HARRY A. SMITH, 620-218 North Wells Street, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



The erection of an addition to Rossford, 
Ohio, roundhouse, which provides an office for 
the roundhouse foreman, is an improvement 
which has been much needed, and from the 
pleased expression upon the faces of the foreman 
and his clerk, they evidently very greatly 
appreciate it. 

V. N. Dawson, storekeeper Lima, Ohio, and 
H. F. Schwab, storekeeper at Dayton, Ohio, 
have been furloughed for military service and 
while we do not know of the present location 
of either, we earnestly desire that success and 
personal safety accompany them. 

M. H. Beard, formerly assistant supervisor 
of the Ohio Division, has been transferred to 
this division as assistant to division engineer. 

R. W. Hoskinson, of the car distributer's 
department, has been promoted to the position 
of chief yard clerk at Dayton, Ohio. 



Sandy Valley & Elkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, L. E. Gatewood. Chief Clerk, 
Jenkins, Ky. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. R. Laughlin Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenbhip Section Foreman 

S. H. Johnson Engineer 

E. E. Cassidy Fireman 

J. M. MooRE Conductor 

Glenwood Shops 

The shop employes witnessed a sad spectacle 
on Auf^st 5 when four residences on Sunnyside 
Street, on the hill opposite the shops, were 
burned. Three of these were homes of shop 
employes, and were beinjr purchased through 
the assistance of our Relief Department. 

J. Miller was promoted August 1 to car fore- 
man, in place of J. M. Connors, Jr., assigned to 
other duties. 

Our general foreman, W. F. Ambrose, re- 
cently took an automobile trip to Strasburg, 
Va., and to see "BiH'H" ountenance when he 
speaks of the trip it would seoin that he had 
some time. 



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The Real Estate Educator 



By F. M. PAYNE 



NEW EDITION 



The Fourth of .July celebration given the 
children of Hazel wood and (ilenwood by the 
shof) <'rii])]()y('H was a great success, some .3,000 

IHeane mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



A book for hustling Real Estate 
boosters, promoters, town builders and 
every man who owns, sells, rents or 
leases real estate of any kind. "Don'ts" 
in Real Estate "Pointers," Specific Legal 
Forms, &c., &c. 

The New 1916 Edition contains The 
Torren's System of Registration, 
Available U. S. Lands for Homesteads. 
The A. B. C.'s of Realty. 

Workmen's Compensation Act, In- 
come Tax Law, Employer's Liability 
Act, Statute of Frauds, How to Sell 
Real Estate, How to Become a Notary 
Public or Commissioner of Deeds, 
and other Useful Information. 

This book is an inspiration to the in- 
different and a stimulus to the ambitious. 
Apart from the a^ent, operator or con- 
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contents that will prove of great value 
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Mortgages, Leases, Evictions, etc. The cost might be 
saved many times over in one transaction. 

Cloth, 246 Pa^es. Price $1.50 Postpaid 




Baltimore and Ohio Employes Magazine, Baltimore, Md. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



79 




BOILER SB OP FORCE AT GLENWOOD SHOPS 



persons being present. The sixty gallons of 
ice cream distributed in cones satisfied the appe- 
tites of both young and old and the fireworks 
were appreciated. Glenwood shop orchestra 
furnished the music. 

Beginning Wednesday, August 7, medical 
examiner Bossyns took up the instruction of 
certain shop employes in first aid work. Go 
to it ''Doc," as you have a good bunch to in- 
struct. 

John Miller has been appointed car foreman 
at Glenwood in place of John Conners. We 
wish Mr. Miller success in his new position. 

The picture above is that of piecework in- 
spector Dunmire, foreman Pollack, assistant 
foreman Love and boiler inspector Robson, of 
the boiler shop. All of them are well known 
about the shops and liked. 

Asks Help in Finding Packages 

Under date of July 11, 1918, Encyclopaedia 
Brittanica Corporation, 286 Fourth Avenue, 
New York City, advised: 

"Considerable difficulty has been encountered 
when our shipments were offered for delivery, 
after being delayed in transit, resulting in many 
not being delivered or ordered returned to ship- 
pers' warehouses; consequently were sent to 
public storage. At the present time it is im- 
possible to give you a record of any particular 
shipment as our records were improperly kept; 
however, we want all our shipments returned 
(that have been refused or imclaimed) and will 
arrange to pay all accrued charges, which will 
eliminate many claims." 

These people have representatives in various 
cities and towns, disposing of the Encyclo- 
paedia Brittanica, which is put up in various 
volumes and no doubt you are familiar with 
same. Please go over your records prom.ptly 
and advise if you have any record of storing any 
of these shipments or if you have any on hand 



that you are unable to deliver account of being 
refused or unclaimed; in either instance, give us 
full particulars so we may take up in line with 
the above and arrange disposition. 

If future shipments of these people are re- 
fused or unclaimed advise this office promptly, 
in order that prompt disposition may be se- 
cured. Yours for prevention, 
C. C. Glessner, 

Auditor Freight Claims. 



Advertising 
Announcement 



WE cordially invite all employes to inspect care- 
fully the advertising appearing in our Magazine. 
It is our purpose to offer only such things as will 
legitimately appeal to the rank and file of our readers. 
All advertising will be rigidly examined before inser- 
tion so that there may be no question about its stand- 
ard. No objectionable advertising will be accepted. 

ADVERTISING RATES 

$35.00 per page, each insertion and pro rata 
for halves, quarters and eighths, and $2.19 
per inch (14 agate lines to an inch, one- 
sixteenth page). Width of column 16 ems 
or 2f inches. 

Rates for covers, extra colors and preferred 
positions will be supplied upon request. 



For further particulars address 

WILLIAM F. BRADEN 
Advertising Manager 
Mount Royal Station Baltimore, Maryland 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Stories 



1 



lovel. 



20V 



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Story For 



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The girl got $6 a week and was lonely, 
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BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Volume 6 



CONTENTS 

Cover Design Howard Chandler Christy 

Director General McAdoo Calls Idle Engine a "Prussian Soldier" 5 

Lest We Forget To Do Our Part 9 

"Markham Way" Brings Rasults II 

Employes Urged to Buy Bonds 13 

H. W. Belnap Talks on Safety Plan 14 

K. D. Walker. Oldest Railroad Man 17 

•'What I am Doing to Help Win the War" . / 20 

Maintenance Labor-Saving Devices By Earl Stimson 21 

Engineer Gives Three Sons to United States 25 

Fireman E. W. Bennett May Get Medal for Bravery 27 

C. W. Galloway Thirty-Five Years in the Service 29 

J. T. Johnson Dies at Cleveland 30 

Railroad Administration Defended By T. H. Price 31 

Scrap Pile Helps Buffet Kaiser 35 

Facts About Our Army 36 

Safety First Roll of Honor 37 

News of Veterans' Association 38 

Soldiers Need Books 39 

Editorial 40 

Changes and Promotions 43 

Garrett (Indiana) Man Dies in Service 46 

Railroad Administration Orders and Circulars 47 

Letters from "Over There" 50 

Among Ourselves 53 

.United States Aimy Insignia 78 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes of the 
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Every Bad Order Locomotive is a "Prussian 
Soldier," Says McAdoo. Cheered 
Along Baltimore and Ohio 



^'General Pershing needs more locomotives in France to keep the big American 
smash going until the Kaiser is pushed across the Rhine. The only way we 
can give General Pershing the locomotives he needs is for the railroads of the 
United States to take as few new locomotives as possible and thus permit the 
locomotive builders to send their product to France. We cannot do without 
new locomotives unless we keep our locomotives in repair and moving all the 
time. I make a special appeal to every railroad mechanic and workman to 
do his level best to turn the locomotives out of the shops quickly and to keep 
their wheels turning on every railroad of the United States. Here's a direct 
way in which every man can help Pershing and his heroic soldiers and make 
certain the early defeat of the Kaiser." 

W. G. McADOO, Director General, 
United States Railroad Administration. 



G. McADOO, Director General 
of Railroads, made his first trip 
over the Baltimore and Ohio 
Eastern lines on September 12, 
and the welcome given him all along 
the line must have heartened him and 
proved that the employes of this road 
are behind him in his efforts to keep 
the necessities going forward to the 
American soldiers fighting in Europe. 
After making a most stirring speech at 
Altoona, Pa., to employes of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, Mr. McAdoo, in his 
special train, decided to come over the 
Baltimore and Ohio lines and see how 
traffic was moving. 

His train moved over the Cumber- 
land Valley Railroad from Harrisburg to 
Cumbo, at which point it was delivered 
to the Baltimore and Ohio. Leaving 
Gumbo the train sped on to Cumberland, 
where a large crowd of railroad workers 
had assembled. Mr. McAdoo was cheered 
to the echo as the train passed the shops 
at that place. At Keyser there was 
another crowd and again the Director 
General received an enthusiastic welcome. 
The time of his arrival at Grafton, W. Va., 
had become known and in the face of one 



of the worst rain and thunder storms that 
that city has experienced, a large crowd 
braved the elements to wait for the 
Director General. When Mr. McAdoo 
appeared on the platform of his car, 
a gi^eat cheer went up. He welcomed 
the workers aboard his train and grasped 
each sturdy hand and gave it a warm 
shake. As the group grew dense on the 
platform, there was a request for a few 
words and Mr. McAdoo told those about 
him that he was proud of the work they 
are doing and that the more energy they 
put into their tasks, the greater would 
be the accomplishments and the shorter 
the war. He said that the sooner the 
railroad work was completed, the sooner 
would the boys ''over there" come home. 

There was a hearty shout for Mr. 
McAdoo and George W. Stunner, of 
Baltimore, proposed three cheers. Mr, 
McAdoo acknowledged his gratefulness 
and urged that three lustier cheers be 
given for the men in France. The 
shouts rang through the night. 

Mr. McAdoo continued on the Balti- 
more and Ohio and the Coal and Coke 
roads, reaching Charleston early on the 
morning of Septembei 13. 



5 



6 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The Director General was accompanied 
by Judge Robert S. Lovett, director divi- 
sion of capital expenditure^ ; Carl R. 
Gray, director division of operations; 
Edwards Chambers, director division of 
traffic; Oscar A. Price, assistant to di- 
rector general; C. H. Markham, regional 
director of the Allegheny Region, and L. 
W. Baldwin, his operating assistant ; A. W. 
Thompson, Federal Manager, Baltimore 
and Ohio Eastern Lines, S. Ennes, gen- 
eral manager, and E. E. Hamilton, assist- 
ant to Federal manager. 

In his address at Altoona Mr. McAdoo 
pointed out that ''every bad order loco- 
motive is a Prussian soldier; every idle 
locomotive is working for the Kaiser." 
He weighed on the other hand the value 
of a locomotive in good running order 
and declared that every such machine 
is an American soldier and that every 
moving engine is working for Uncle Sam. 
He made a strong plea for the greater 
purchase of Liberty bonds by railroad 
men and pointed to the sacrifices that 
the sons of many railroaders are making 
on the battlefields of France. 

Mr. McAdoo's speech was as follows: 
''We railroad men have a great re- 
sponsibilty in this war. I do not know 
of any one class in America that has a 
greater responsibihty than the railroad 
men. I am proud to be one of you and 
to work with you in this great, cause in 
which America's very life is involved 
and in which the great principles of lib- 
erty and democracy, upon which oar 
Government is founded, are imperiled 
throughout the world. 

"It depends upon what we do here, 
not only in America, but in these shops 
and upon these railroads, whether or not 
we are going to make democracy safe 
for the futures and whether or not we 
are going to bury the Kaiser so deep 
that he never will be able to answer the 
call of Resurn^ction Day. 

"What is the heart of the transporta- 
tion system of America? It is the motiv(; 
power. Thd motive pow(;r of a railroad 
is just as vital to it as the heart is to 
the human body. Unless you keep the 
motive power rolling, no railroad can 
function. It makes no difference how 
good your track isj how many coaches 



and freight cars and baggage cars you 
have, nor how many men are on the line 
willing to work, if your locomotives do 
not function, everything comes to a stand- 
still — there is paralysis. 

"What is the seat of the locomotive 
pow^r? It is you men here. You make 
tha locomotives and repair them, and 
after you have made and repaired them, 
they pass on to the transportation men, 
whose business it is to see that they 
go. We have started the Kaiser toward 
Berlin and when we get through pushing 
that circle which last June you saw 
bulging toward America, the rim. will 
be so far east that Berlin will be in the 
center of it, and the Kaiser's power for 
evil will be destroyed. All despotic 
crowned heads would serve humanity 
infinitely better if they could be made 
to do some of the honorable work that 
you men are doing here. We are going 
to try to fix it so that in the German 
Empire, as well as all over the world, 
human beings won't be bartered and 
sold and ruled by force, but will have 
the right, as American freemen have 
the right, to express themselves, and to 
constitute and manage their own govern- 
ments. 

"I want you men to realize this: We 
have sent already to Europe 1,600,000 of 
our splendid sons. Many of them are 
sons of you men into whose faces I am 
looking now. Whether they are your 
sons or my sons — and my three sons, all 
of my sons, are in this war — or whether 
they are the sons of other Americans, 
makes no difference for the purpose of 
this war. We know that they are the sons 
of Americans all over the country; that 
they are our brothers and that our first 
thought is of them. They are the men 
who have got to shed their blood and 
die for us and for human liberty. 

The Price We Pay 

" I want "you to realize that every man 
and woman within the range of my voice 
can save American lives on the battle- 
fields of Europe. Every minute that 
passes by the watch as it ticks in my 
pocket and in yours is actually measured 
in American blood and treasure. It is 
the price we pay as long as this war 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



7 



lasts. Every minute that passes as we 
stand here is being registered in American 
blood on the battlefields of Europe and 
in American money paid out of the Treas- 
ury of the United States. The money 
is of small consequence. What nobler 
use can we make of our money than to 
make it serve humanity? But our 
blood is another matter. We cannot 
restore blood to the dead body. Once 
an American hero gives his blood and 
the last gasp of his breath for you and 
for humanity, he has made the sublime 



we had better keep them at home. Our 
highest duty is to see that everything 
our splendid sons in France need get& 
there on time, all the time, and in suffi- 
cient quantity. The extent to which 
we fail to do this is the extent to which 
w^e compel the shedding of more Ameri- 
can blood and the giving of more American 
treasure than is necessary or justifiable. 

''I want every man in this audience 
to remember this : When you are work- 
ing at your lathe, or when you are driving 
a rivet, or when you are forging a bolt, 




WHICH SOLDIER ARE YOU SUPPORTING ? 



sacrifice and has made incomparably 
the greatest contribution to the cause 
of liberty and humanity. 

"So, my friends, it is up to us to see 
that no more of them pay that price in 
blood than is absolutely necessary. We 
cannot fight this war with soldiers alone. 
We can send 10,000,000 American men 
to France, but if those of us who stay at 
home do not do our duty equally well, 
do not work up to the limit with every 
ounce of energy and patriotism that is 
in our bodies, by turning the necessarj^ 
stuff out quickly, so that those men we 
send out to do the fighting for us get 
what they need, on time, all the time 
and in sufficient quantity to do the job. 



or doing any other thing in the repair 
of one of these bad order locomotives 
which is necessary to be done to resurrect 
it and put life into it again, the quicker 
you do your part of the job, the more 
you put into your job in the working day, 
the more effective is your contribution 
to the war. So important is time and 
precision and efficiency these days that 
one rivet driven twice as quickly as in 
peace time may mean the actual saving 
of the life of some American boy in 
France. I do not exaggerate in making 
that statement. More work, more effici- 
ency, more speed means that the war 
will end that much sooner. The more 
quickly we lick the Kaiser, the more 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



American lives we shall save and the 
sooner shall be that triumphal pro- 
cession of America's heroes on Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue in Washington, with the 
Stars and Stapes proudly flying, and 
a new message to humanity emblazoned 
upon its folds, meaning that not alone 
Aiiierica, but all the world is liberated 
and men are free everywhere. 

I want you to realize this : Every bad , 
order locomotive is a 'Prussian' soldier; 
every idle locomotive is working for the 
Kaiser. Every live locomotive is an 
American soldier; every moving locomo- 
tive is working for Uncle Sam. Let us 
get on top of these Prussian locomotives 
and make American soldiers out of them. 

''We are all together in this great 
cause upon the success of which the 
future of the world depends. This will 
be the judgment day for us or for the 
Kaiser. We are going to make it the 
judgment day for the Kaiser, and the 
inevitable punishment of the Kaiser is 
going to come just so much more quickly 
as you do your work with new zeal, en- 
thusiasm and patriotism. 

''I want to thank the men in these 
shops for what they have • done in the 
Liberty loans. You have come across 
in fine style. What better use can you 
make of your money than to lend it to 
Uncle Sam on impregnable security? 
By doing this you increase your own 
fortune and lay aside something for a 
rainy day. Uncle Sam always pays his 
debts in full at maturity and interest in 
the meantime. While you are helping 
yourself, you are helping every American 
soldier in France when you buy Liberty 
bonds, because you are putting Uncle 
Sam in the way of getting the money 
to carry on the war, to pay your wages 
and to back our soldiers and sailors with 
all the; things they need to fight effectively. 
Th(! Tr(;asury of the United States is 
today carrying the load practically of 
th3 entire world in finance. You are 
helping your government whenever you 
buy bonds of the United States. 

Wants All To Go The Limit 

''While I thank you for all you have 
done in these Liberty loans, I want to 



tell you that you have not yet gone the 
hmit of what you can do. I know that 
you can do more in lending your money 
to the Government, and I recommend 
this form of investment to you not only 
for your own welfare but because the 
further you go in lending your money 
to Uncle Sam, the greater the service you 
will perform for Ihe country. So, buy 
the bonds of the United States to the 
limit of your ability and you will be doing 
your part all the more towards helping 
to win the war. 

"If you have not money enough to 
buy a Liberty bond, even of the smallest 
denomination ($50), buy War Savings 
Stamps. I am sure that from the 
prosperous appearance of you all, there 
is no one of you who cannot buy at least 
a $50 Liberty bond. I hope so at any 
rate, because I want you to have just 
rewards for your labor. I have tried 
to help you, and I want you to help me, 
because unless you help me, I cannot 
make a success of these' railroads. I am 
not worth anything to the country unless 
you help me make a success of this great 
business, not for the sake of McAdoo, 
but for the sake of Uncle Sam. He is 
the only one we should think about these 
days. 

"This is a great time in the world; a 
time when we must get new conceptions 
and new ideals of duty to our countrj^ 
and to humanity. It is a glorious thing 
to serve unselfishly. The only thing 
that is more glorious is to give your life 
for your country. That is the very 
essence and quintessence and sublimity 
of patriotism. 

"Whatever we may think about what 
we are doing here at home, important as 
that is, whatever inconveniences we may 
think we are suffering, whatever sacri- 
fic:)s we may think we are making, how- 
ever noble and fine may be the things we 
are doing, when they are done earnestly 
and with a purpose to serve the Nation 
and the world, I want you to remember 
that it is not comparable with what the 
son of any man in this crowd is doing 
for his country in France. Just think 
of what that son of some noble mechanic 
in this joatriotic city of Altoona is doing 
now while I am speaking to you here: It 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 



is night in France, with all of the black- 
ness and terrors of modern war settled 
upon the trenches along that Western 
Front. There stands our soldier one, 
of your sons, in the trenches, with his 
eyes glued on the darkness, his nerves 
tense, and every faculty alert, keenly 
watching for the first sign of the mur- 
derous and oncoming enemy in order 
that he may signal his fellows behind him 
and in order that they, in turn, may be 
prepared to meet the assault, defend the 
honor of our flag, and protect th i lives and 
liberty of all of us who stay at home ! 

"He and every other fighting soldier 
who daily faces the perils of warfare are 
making the real sacrifices in this war. 

''Whenever you find yourself thinking 
that you are not receiving all you think 
you ought to have, whenever you find 
yourself becoming impatient because you 
think your comfort and your pleasure 
are being disturbed by the war, just take 
a ledger and strike a balance between 
your situation and that of your son or 
the son of any other patriotic American 



who is fighting in the trenches in France. 
You will find that the worst that could 
happen to you in liberty-loving and un- 
ravaged America is infinitely better than 
the things that are happening to the 
sons of America who are fighting in those 
bloody trenches. Then you can say: 
T am indeed fortunate, even if I cannot 
get all I want or think I ought to have, 
and I thank God that I am an American 
citizen. I am ready fco serve my country 
too, and will do my best at home to back 
up our boys in France. I will give my 
life too, if need be, to help my country 
and those who are fighting for it and for 
world hberty.' 

''Let me beg you to take up your tasks 
with new energy, new enthusiasm and 
new determination to quicken every dead 
Prussian locomotive into a live American 
soldier, and to make every locomotive- 
soldier do its duty with the same effective- 
ness and the same patriotism that every 
American soldier of flesh and blood is 
doing his duty on the blood-stained fields 
of outraged France!" 



Lest We Forget To Do Our Part 



HHEY say, who have come back 
from ^'over there, ' that at night 
the troubled earth between the 
lines is carpeted with pain. They 
say that Death rides whistling in every 
wind, and that the very mists are charged 
with awful torment. They say that 
of all things spent and squandered there, 
young human life is held least dear. It 
is not the pleasantest prospect for those 
of us who can yet feel upon our lips the 
pressure of our mother's good-bye kiss. 

But, please God, our love of life is not 
so prized as love of right. In this re- 
naissance of our country's valor, we who 
will edge the wedge of her assault make 
calm acceptance of its hazards. For 



us, the steel-swept trench, the stifi'ening 
cold — weariness, hardship, worse. For 
you for whom we go, you millions safe 
at home— what for you? 

We shall need food. We shall need 
care. We shall need clothes for our 
bodies and weapons for Our hands. We 
shall need terribly and without failure 
supplies and equipment in a stream that 
is constant and never-ending. From you, 
who are our resource and reliance, who 
are the heart and hope of that humanity 
for which we smite and strive, must come 
these things. 

(Signed) 
Citizen Soldier No. 258, 
— th District, National Draft Army. 



One Second of Carelessness — Lifetime of Regret 




10 



The "Markham Way" of Improving Service 
Bringing Results in Allegheny Region 



IRANSPORTATION conditions 
on the Allegheny Region, of 
which the Baltimore and Ohio 
Lines East are a part, showed 
'^continued improvement," according to 
Charles H. Markham, Federal director 
of the region, whose latest report recently 
was issued. He stated that the passen- 
ger traffic was well handled and that there 
has been a material improvement in the 
perishable" service. 
Mr. Markham, who made the report 
to Director General McAdoo, declares 
that the shortage of mechanics and labor- 
ers is retarding progress somewhat. 
He points to the heavy movement of 
troops in June and July and to the wear 
and tear this brought upon equipment. 
His report is as follows : 

My Dear Sir: There follows a brief 
review of the work of the Allegheny re- 
gion organization for the two-month 
period beginning June 1 and ending 
July 31: 

Transportation conditions during 
June and July were fair and showed con- 
tinued improvement. Freight traffic, 
considering the volume, moved with 
reasonable promptness. There was no 
congestion, as the movement of business 
to the larger industrial centers and for 
export is controlled by permits. The 
embargo against lumber from the south 
has been removed, except as to points on 
the seaboard between Washington and 
Jersey City, where it is moved on permits. 

''During June and July the car sup- 
ply was generally good and met the 
demand. 

''In June anthracite coal loading was 
63,187 cars, an increase of 4,179 cars over 
last year; bituminous 191,767, increase 
22,781. July anthracite loading was 
69,630 cars, increase 2,329 cars; bitumi- 
nous 223,014 cars, increase 35,100. 

"Coal dumped at tidewater increased 



223,536 tons in June and 444,916 tons in 
July, as compared with corresponding 
months last year. 

"Blast furnace operations reports for 
the last week in June and July show: 

JUNE JULY 

By-product ovens in operation, 
per cent 95 93 

Blast furnaces in operation, per 

cent ' 94 90 

Open hearth and Bessemer con- 
verters in operation 88 85 

and the operations not affected by any 
transportation deficiencies. 

"There has been a material improve- 
ment in our perishable service in the 
past sixty days, and the vegetable 
movement from the trucking sections of 
Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey 
is being handled in a manner satisfac- 
tory to shippers. The southern peaches 
were handled in excellent shape. 

"The heavy passenger business was 
well handled and passenger train sched- 
ules were maintained with reasonable 
regularity. 

"Troop movements have been heavy 
throughout June and July, but were 
handled in a most satisfactory manner. 

"Shortage of mechanics and laborers 
is retarding progress in repairing bad 
order cars, resulting in an accumulation 
above normal. Repairs to locomotives 
are progressing satisfactorily. 

"Constant study is being given the 
question of coordinating facilities and 
service and the handling of traffic via 
the most favorable routes. 

"Since June 1, 204 unifications have 
been effected, reheving a large number 
of employes for other service. There 
have been thirty-six diversions of freight 
traffic of considerable magnitude for the 
purpose of relieving congested routes and 
districts, using routes which are shorter or 
have more advantageous grades, or in- 
creasing capacity of certain routes for 

11 J 



12 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



other traffic. Typical of this is the re- 
routing of Baltimore and Ohio freight and 
passpgers trains over the P. & L. E. tracks 
between McKeesport and New Castle 
Junction and the coordinating of passen- 
ger traffic on the Pennsylvania and Phila- 
delphia & Reading, between Philadelphia, 
Norristown, Reading and Pottsville, 
effecting a saving of 322,296 passenger 
train miles yearly, all of which repre- 
sents a yearly saving of approximately 
$1,240,000. 

^'Additions and betterment work is 
progressing well, considering the diffi- 
culty in obtaining labor and materials." 

A short time ago Mr. Markham 
visited the Baltimore terminals and 
officials of the Baltimore and Ohio had 
the opportunity of renewing acquaint- 
ance with the former president of the 
Illinois Central system and at the same 
time studying the man who is now in 
charge of the real heart of the transpor- 
tation system of the country. 

The Allegheny Region, which em- 
braces the railroad lines in Pennsylvania, 
Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and 
West Virginia, is turning out about 
seventy-five per cent, of the war supplies 
and producing about eighty per cent, 
of the fuel used in the United States. 
One can readily appreciate the huge 
task that confronts the manager of all 
these lines which move this great bulk 
of freight. But Director General Mc- 
Adoo chose wisely when he picked Mr. 
Markham for this undertaking. His 
visit to Baltimore terminals proved that 
he is familiar with all the problems that 
a big railroad faces these days in moving 
great trains loaded with necessities for 
the army of more than 1,600,000 that is 
across the seas. The few things that 
wer(i not altogether clear to his mind 
he asked about minutc^ly and he left 
Bahimon; with tlu; data all collocated 
in his mind. 

To tackk; the; big job of handling the 
affairs of the Alicglusny Region, Mr. 
Markham is well (K{uipped })y training, 
exix;rience and t(imperament. In sta- 
ture; short,, he is sturdy and nuiscular, 
with a square jaw anct a finn moiith. 
H(i's an f)ptimist of the first water. It 
is recalled by many of his fiiends that 



he said early in life that he would never 
say anything unless he could talk about 
something over which he could enthuse. 
''Let others express doleful opinions, if 
they must," he once said, "but for me, 
I will talk encouragement, or nothing." 

Now fifty-seven years old, Mr. Mark- 
ham has climbed the ladder of fame with 
unparalleled energy, reaching the very 
responsible position he now occupies 
after starting as a track section gang 
laborer on the Atchison. Born at Clarks- 
ville, Tenn., he received the usual public 
school education of the boy of the small 
town. After leaving the Atchison, he 
entered the Southern Pacific service, 
also in very lowly work, but it was not 
long before he won recognition. He 
was named station agent, later general 
manager and finally, in 1904, vice-presi- 
dent of this great railroad system. He 
withdrew from railroad service later to 
become general manager of an important 
oil property that is now controlled by 
the Gulf Oil Corporation. For six years 
he continued in this field. 

Then, in 1911, he heard the call of his 
old love and accepted the presidency of 
the Illinois Central Railroad. This com- 
prises 4,774 miles of lines and last year 
earned $87,000,000 gross. In directing 
the affairs of this railroad and, in fact, 
of the other road with which he was 
connected in an official capacity, his 
first desire was to give service and make 
the patrons of the railroad and the ter- 
ritory served prosperous. He next la- 
bored to make the railroad operations 
profitable. To accomplish these de- 
sires he invariably and persistently strove 
to move traffic in the greatest volume 
and as quickly as possible and to get 
the largest movement out of cars and 
locomotives, the maximum service out 
of other facilities and the fullest value 
out of the capital investment. 

It is more miles and tons and passen- 
gei-s per car and ]wv locomotive which 
Mr. Markham now counts upon to over- 
come th(; ti-ansportation shortage in the 
Alk^gheny R(»gion and thus more quickly 
defeat the Hun. He left the Illinois 
('('ntral to take up the direction of the 
big halves of the Baltimore and Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, the Rc^ading, the Western 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



13 



Maryland, the New Jersey Central, the 
Pittsburgh and Lake Erie and several 
other smaller railroads. They are being 
made to operate in the Markham way. 
He wants SERVICE with a big ^^S," 
and performed in the most economical 
way. He is getting traffic over the lines 



in larger volume and in shorter time 
than heretofore. That's his object. He 
wants the help of every railroad man in 
the Allegheny Region. None will be 
able to work harder or strive more con- 
sistently towards this end than Director 
Markham. Be optimistic with him. 



Employes Urged to Help Fourth Loan 



mIRECTOR GENERAL McADOO 
is distributing the following 
Liberty Loan message to all 
railroad employes: 
In order to raise sufficient money to 
arm, equip and support our gallant 
soldiers and sailors, to finance our other 
war activities and to extend necessary 
credits to our allies, to enable them to 
continue the war against the German 
militarj^ despotism, the Fourth Liberty 
Loan campaign will begin September 28, 
1918. Every loyal American must in- 
vest in the securities of his Govern- 
ment to the limit of his ability if 
America is to triumph in this war. 

Railroad men and women are doing a 
vital service for their country. They 
responded patriotically to the appeal of 
the Government in the First, Second and 
Third Liberty Loan campaigns and I 
hope that they have bought hberally of 
War Savings Stamps. They are also 
operating the railroads, which is war 
service of primary importance. I am 
sure that they count it a glorious privi- 
lege to do this vital work for their coun- 
try. I deeply appreciate what they have 
already done, but there is more to do and 
I am sure that they will do more if the 
way is pointed out to them. 

The enormous sums required to finance 
democracy's part in the war impose a 
new duty upon each and every one of us. 
Liberty Loans must be offered from time 
to time until the Kaiser is licked to a 
finish. Each of these loans must be 
subscribed in full. No patriotic American 
will have performed his duty by sub- 



scribing to one loan only, or by buying 
a few War Savings Stamps. Each and 
every one should practice every possible 
economy, save every possible dollar, and 
buy as many Liberty Bonds as he can 
afford every time a Liberty Loan is 
offered to the country. 

In the Fourth Liberty Loan cam- 
paign which is just ahead of us I wish 
to make a special appeal to every rail- 
road employe to go the limit in lending 
of his available means to Uncle Sam. 
Now is the time to prepare for that cam- 
paign by saving every possible dollar, 
so that each may be ready to do his part 
before the subscription closes. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of employes in the 
railroad service of the United States 
have received, or will receive, checks for 
back pay, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the Wage Order I approved 
May 25, 1918, and Supplement No. 4 
to General Order 27, issued on July 25, 
1918. No employe can make better use 
of his back pay than to lend it to the 
Government at interest, thus securing 
an investment of absolute safety for 
himself and building up a reserve for a 
rainy day. 

I want the railroad men and women 
of the United States to do more, if possi- 
ble, than anybody else, because I want 
them to be among the first always in 
patriotism, in service and in sacrifice 
to our great and glorious country. We 
have the Kaiser groggy — let us keep 
hitting hard now until he is counted out. 

W. G. McAdoo, 
Director General of Railroads. 



Safety Congress Emphasizes Necessity of 
Preserving the Man-Power of 
the Country 



TJHE Seventh Annual Safety Con- 
I gress, which assembled in St. 
Louis from September 16 to 20, 
inclusive, took on a greatei 
meaning for the future L'fe of the nation 
than any former gathering of the men 
and women who are deeply interested 
in the preservation of life and limb of 
the man-power of the United States. 
There were present at the meetings 
representatives of governmental depart- 
ments, railroads, textile works, ammu- 
nition and other factories, ship yards 
and other industries that so sorely need 
every worker who is capable of perform- 
ing the duties assigned to him. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad was 
represented by J. T. Broderick, super- 
visor of the Safety and Welfare De- 
partment, who read a paper in the 
Round Table meeting of the Steam 
Railroad Section on ''Reaching Officers 
and Obtaining Their Cooperation." 
Great interest centered in the address 
of Hiram W. Belnap, Manager Safety 
Section, Division of Transportation, 
United States Railroad Administration. 
He (leclar(;d that the Safety movement, 
in which the Fed(^ral administration has 
taken a deep and abiding interest, can 
only be successful when all give their 
hearty cooperation and "push with all 
energy. " 

Mr. J^ehuip declanMl that it is ''just 
as much tin; (luty of th(; supervising officer 
to sup 'rvisc! for saf(;ty as it is to get the 
cars out of tin; yard or trains over th(^ 
road." Th(^ Saf(;ty prol)l(;m, he stated, 
is a "grave one," and must not b(^ 
dismisHCKl lightly because sonuj say that 
" What's (!very})ody's })usiness is nobody's 
business." llis talk b(;fore the St(;am 
Railroad Section of the Saf(;ty (congress 



showed that, the Railroad Administration 
is determined to preserve in every way 
possible the life and limb of employes, in 
view, especially, of the loss of man-power 
that the war is causing. 

Mr. Belnap's address, which is of vital 
importance to every railroad man, be 
he official or track hand, was as follows: 

"The subject of railroad accidents, 
taken from whatever angle, is both an 
important and a serious one; their 
causes and means to prevent them have 
caused general discussion for many years. 

"No employe or officer wilfully does 
his work with an intent to cause acci- 
dents, for well they know that such an 
accident might result in manslaughter 
or suicide; on the contrary, they are 
vitally interested in any plan or method 
that will result in reducing the hazard 
to themselves and the ever continuing 
number of casualties among their own 
ranks, as well as to the traveling public. 

"It is not my purpose to burden this 
discussion with statistics with which all 
are probably more or less familiar, but 
I do want to call attention briefly to the 
record of the last five years, which 
clearly shows the tremendous importance 
of our pro})lem and the necessity for real 
constructive accident-prevention work. 

"When we read this accident record, 
it seems almost incredible that in the 
pea(!(^ful opei-ation of our railroads there 
is such an enormous loss of life and limb. 
In th(^ fiv(^ year pc^riod enduig Decem- 
ber 31, 1917, there was a total casualty 
list on our American railroads of 980,565. 
Of this number 48,801 were deaths and 
931,7()4 were i \juries. Dming this pe- 
l iod, 1,391 j)assengers and persons carried 
under contract were killed and 55,887 
inj\u-(Hl; 14,(352 empl()y(\s were kilknl and 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



15 



815,897 injured. 32,879 other persons 
were killed and 60,080 injured. 

One Lost Every Three Minutes 

''As indicative of this loss of life and 
limb in the operation of our railroads, 
in 1916 in train accidents alone one em- 
ploye was killed every three and one-half 
hours; one employe was injured every 
ten min.utes. And taking into account 
all accidents, one employe was either 
killed or injured every three minutes 
during the entire year. You can readily 
see how vitally interested in accident 
prevention railroad employes should be, 
because it is they who are suffering the 
greatest loss on account of these acci- 
dents. Thirty per cent, of all the killed 
and nin.ety per cent, of all the injured on 
the railroads in the United States are 
railroad employes. 

''Then, too, there is an immense 
amount of money paid out every year 
on account of accidents. The amount 
reported by the carriers, which was paid 
on account of death to employes, pass- 
engers, trespassers and others, as well 
as the expense of settlement, including 
the expenses of claim adjustors and the 
like provided by the classification of 
operating expenses, averaged during the 
five year period approximately $30,000,- 
000 per year. While the records do not 
disclose accurately the amount paid 
on account of the deaths and injuries 
to employes alone, several roads have 
kept this item separately and an analysis 
of this indicates that about fifty percent, 
of this total expense is paid to employes 
on account of deaths and injuries. 

"Large as these figures are, they rep- 
resent only the amount of money that 
has been paid by the railroads. For the 
purpose of indicating the vital interest 
of employes in accident prevention, 
statistics were secured from several of 
the train service organizations that insure 
their members and pay for loss of fife 
or total disability. 

Hits Brotherhood Hard 

"The Brotherhood of